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Customer Reviews: 488
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J. Donaldson "Cal-diver" RSS Feed (Redding, CA USA)
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Plastic Picture Credit Card Wallet Insert - 12 Sleeves
Plastic Picture Credit Card Wallet Insert - 12 Sleeves
Offered by LuggagePlanet
Price: $2.55
3 used & new from $2.00

5.0 out of 5 stars My choice for a wallet, September 23, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I use these wallet inserts as a wallet because they are small in my back pocket. This 12 page insert is just the right size for the number of cards I carry.

Sometimes these are hard to find at the local stores. I was pleased to find them on Amazon.

They last me between six months and a year.


Set of 2 - 12 Page Plastic Wallet Inserts for Pictures or Credit Cards
Set of 2 - 12 Page Plastic Wallet Inserts for Pictures or Credit Cards
Offered by Menswallet
Price: $2.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for me., September 23, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I don't carry a wallet because they make to large a lump in my back pocket. I find I only carry credit card sized items, the paper dollars go in my front pocket. So for years I've used these wallet inserts as a wallet. This 12 page insert is just the right size for the number of cards I carry.

Sometimes these are hard to find at the local stores. I was pleased to find them on Amazon.

They last me between six months and a year.


Boat Cover Support Pole
Boat Cover Support Pole
Price: $15.94
4 used & new from $14.66

4.0 out of 5 stars Nice but longer would be better in our case., September 23, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Boat Cover Support Pole (Sports)
Easy to use but it could be a little longer. I have two of these. I wish they were about 6" longer. We have a Yamaha jet boat that has high freeboard. Other than that they work fine and are easy to use.


Blue Wave Swimming Pool Hardness Increaser - 8 lb.
Blue Wave Swimming Pool Hardness Increaser - 8 lb.
Offered by Wayfair
Price: $16.53
4 used & new from $16.53

5.0 out of 5 stars Works great in our spa., September 23, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This works as well as the hardness increaser available for much higher prices in smaller containers.


WeatherHawk SM-18 SkyMate Hand-Held Wind Meter, Yellow
WeatherHawk SM-18 SkyMate Hand-Held Wind Meter, Yellow
Price: $62.66
9 used & new from $55.27

5.0 out of 5 stars Great for my personal use, September 23, 2014
My wife bought this for my birthday. It was in my Amazon wish list for many months. I just wanted it out of curiosity.

Weather stations rarely report the amount of rainfall on a regular basis so I purchased a rain gauge. Now I keep track of our rain (or lack of) at our house in California. Its just for fun and conversation. I was also curious about wind-speed and temperature.

We have a boat. I know that over the 15 mile drive from our house to the launch ramp the temperature will vary as much as 10 degrees, this by using the external temperature gauge in our car. But I also know it is cooler when we are on the lake but I didn't know by how much. This little handy device now provides temperature data for me to feed my curiosity. The wind-speed indicator is also handy for determining when whitecaps form on the lake - again just for fun. I'll also use it on our deck which is perched on the edge of a canyon to measure wind-speed on those very windy days we sometimes experience.

This is a simple to use unit that folds up easily so I can just toss it in my boat bag. I'm very pleased with it for my personal curiosity use.


Prime Instant Video
Prime Instant Video
Offered by Appstore - US - MP - Offer
Price: $0.00

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor choice of implementation, September 11, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Prime Instant Video (App)
I do not like how this long awaited app was implemented. I would prefer a stand alone app. If I want to shop I'll go to the Amazon shopping app. If I want to watch a movie I'll go to the Amazon instant video app I want them to have different logins.

I have my apps grouped in folders, one for shopping, one for entertainment. They are two different things and i want them separated for many reasons. I also want my child to watch a movie without worrying that they will be buying things on the whole Amazon store. I want the option to limit purchases so my child doesn't spend my money on movies without me knowing or authorizing. There are many good reasons for implementing the prime video app separate from the general merchandise app.

I see there is a button to skip back but no button to skip forward. I would like the ootion to set the size of the skip the buttons activate. For example I might want the skip forward button to skip 30 seconds or 2 minutes - my choice in the settings.


DEWALT D26441 2.4 Amp 1/4 Sheet Palm Grip Sander with Cloth Dust Bag
DEWALT D26441 2.4 Amp 1/4 Sheet Palm Grip Sander with Cloth Dust Bag
Price: $47.98
16 used & new from $31.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Dewalt D26441 vs Skill 7302-02 Octo Sander, August 26, 2014
I'm sanding a redwood 8' x 16' deck including railings and posts. I started with the Skill Octo Sander but it died about 40% of the way into the project so I bought this Dewalt (not on Amazon) 1/4 sheet sander. So I have a fresh perspective on these two sanders which I've now used on the same day on the same project.

The Skill wasn't a bad sander for light jobs. The "iron" shape with the pointed tip does have advantages. The many included alternate tips could be quite useful for specific jobs but I didn't use them. But the Skill has a plastic body, including the shoe which holds the sandpaper. In my case the front tip of the sanding surface overheated due to friction, melted both the part that is on the sander and the part that snaps on which holds the sandpaper. I could still use if for a while but finally it wouldn't stay together and the front half of the shoe would not stay in place. I ended up tossing it in the trash.

Now onto the Dewalt. It was a little more expensive than the Skill but it seems to be better quality. The first time I tried it I was quite pleased because it was obviously working faster and better than the Skill, even with the same grit sandpaper. The Skill has pressure lights to show you when you're applying too much or too little pressure. The Dewalt says not to apply pressure, but rather to let the sander do the work.

The major difference between the two sanders is how the sandpaper is attached. The Skill has a hook-and-loop (like Velcro) mount for sandpaper. it is very easy to attach a new sheet of sandpaper, and very easy to remove the worn sandpaper. With the Dewalt you use 1/4 sheet of standard sandpaper. You can buy full sheets and cut them up, or for a bit more money you can buy 1/4 sheets already cut. But attaching sandpaper to the Dewalt is a real pain.

With the Dewalt you open the metal latch on each side. Then you slip the leading edge of the sandpaper under the metal bar on the front, then close the metal latch which pushes the metal bar onto the sandpaper holding it in place. Then you do the same with the back end. There isn't much slack with a 1/4 sheet of paper and it is a bit tricky to insert the rear part as it has to make a 180 degree turn and be placed under the rear bar. More than once the sandpaper came loose, sometimes tearing, and I had to replace the sheet of sandpaper.

The hook-and-loop of the Skill is so much easier to use, and the paper doesn't come off until I take it off.

So it's a trade off which sander is better. I'm not crazy about buying another Skill with it's plastic parts, but the sandpaper system is so much better. I don't like the sandpaper attach of the Dewalt but it sands better and quicker and it looks like it won't melt while using it.

As for the iron shape of the Skill vs the square shape of the Dewalt I didn't find much of a difference between the two designs. The Dewalt sort of has two front corners that can get into small places.

In the case of the Skill the special sandpaper that is purchased for it has holes in it so the dust can exit through the holes and can be either captured in the filter, or just exit through the hole if the filter isn't attached. That works much better than a flat piece of sandpaper with no holes (which can be purchased in the iron shape) which clogs much quicker.

In the case of the Dewalt they include a plastic attachment that will punch holes in the 1/4 sheet of sandpaper once it is attached to the sander. The results are the same. The sandpaper doesn't clog as quickly. But again in the case of the Dewalt this is an extra step adding to the exasperation of the whole sandpaper system.

What would be great is to have a hook-and-loop sandpaper system for the Dewalt!

Standard sandpaper for the Dewalt is less expensive than the special hook-and-loop paper for the Skill. However if you buy the pre-cut 1/4 sheets they are actually more expensive than the hook-and-loop.

Take your pick: The Dewalt with sandpaper irritations, or the Skill with inferior plastic parts.

Frankly if there had been a Mikita B03710 1/3 sheet sander on the shelf I would have bought that model.


SKIL 7302-02 Octo Detail Sander with PC
SKIL 7302-02 Octo Detail Sander with PC
Price: $39.97
6 used & new from $39.97

3.0 out of 5 stars Skill 7302-02 Octo Sander vs Dewalt D26441, August 26, 2014
This isn't a bad little sander for very light work. I don't recommend it for large jobs like sanding a whole deck. It has it's advantages though.

I'm sanding a redwood 8' x 16' deck including railings and posts. I started with this Skill Octo Sander but it died about 40% of the way into the project so I bought a Dewalt 1/4 sheet sander. So I have a fresh perspective on these two sanders which I've now used on the same day on the same project.

The Skill wasn't a bad sander for light jobs. The "iron" shape with the pointed tip does have advantages. The many included alternate tips could be quite useful for specific jobs but I didn't use them. But the Skill has a plastic body, including the shoe which holds the sandpaper. In my case the front tip of the sander overheated due to friction, melted both the part that is on the sander and the part that snaps on which holds the sandpaper. I could still use if for a while but finally it wouldn't stay together and the front half of the shoe would not stay in place. I ended up tossing it in the trash. When I got to the store I contemplated buying another of the same model but decided to try something different.

Now onto the Dewalt. It was a little more expensive than the Skill but it seems to be better quality. The first time I tried it I was quite pleased because it was obviously working faster and better than the Skill, even with the same grit sandpaper. The Skill has pressure lights to show you when you're applying too much or too little pressure. The Dewalt says not to apply pressure, but rather to let the sander do the work.

The major difference between the two sanders is how the sandpaper is attached. The Skill has a hook-and-loop (like Velcro) mount for sandpaper. it is very easy to attach a new sheet of sandpaper, and very easy to remove the worn sandpaper. With the Dewalt you use 1/4 sheet of standard sandpaper. You can buy full sheets and cut them up, or for a bit more money you can buy 1/4 sheets already cut. But attaching sandpaper to the Dewalt is a real pain.

With the Dewalt you open the metal latch on each side. Then you slip the leading edge of the sandpaper under the metal bar on the front, then close the metal latch which pushes the metal bar onto the sandpaper holding it in place. Then you do the same with the back end. There isn't much slack with a 1/4 sheet of paper and it is a bit tricky to insert the rear part as it has to make a 180 degree turn and be placed under the rear bar. More than once the sandpaper came loose, sometimes tearing, and I had to replace the sheet of sandpaper.

The hook-and-loop of the Skill is so much easier to use, and the paper doesn't come off until I take it off.

So it's a trade off which sander is better. I'm not crazy about buying another Skill with it's plastic parts, but the sandpaper system is so much better. I don't like the sandpaper attach of the Dewalt but it sands better and quicker and it looks like it won't melt while using it. Clearly my job is going faster with the Dewalt in spite of sandpaper headaches.

As for the iron shape of the Skill vs the square shape of the Dewalt I didn't find much of a difference between the two designs. The Dewalt sort of has two front corners that can get into small places.

In the case of the Skill the special sandpaper that is purchased for it has holes in it so the dust can exit through the holes and can be either captured in the filter, or just exit through the hole if the filter isn't attached. That works much better than a flat piece of sandpaper with no holes (which can be purchased in the iron shape) which clogs much quicker.

In the case of the Dewalt they include a plastic attachment that will punch holes in the 1/4 sheet of sandpaper once it is attached to the sander. The results are the same. The sandpaper doesn't clog as quickly. But again in the case of the Dewalt this is an extra step adding to the exasperation of the whole sandpaper system.

What would be great is to have a hook-and-loop sandpaper system for the Dewalt!

Standard sandpaper for the Dewalt is less expensive than the special hook-and-loop paper for the Skill. However if you buy the pre-cut 1/4 sheets they are actually more expensive than the hook-and-loop.

Take your pick: The Dewalt with sandpaper irritations, or the Skill with inferior plastic parts.

Frankly if there had been a Mikita B03710 1/3 sheet sander on the shelf I would have bought that model.


HP PSC 1210 Multifunction
HP PSC 1210 Multifunction
7 used & new from $28.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Great little slow printer / scanner / copier, August 25, 2014
I don't know exactly how long we've owned this printer, perhaps 9 or 10 years, but I'm glad we have it. This is a really slow printer, but it works. It scans slowly - but it works. It copies slowly - but it works.

I doubt if we've had more than 5 to 10 paper jams over the 10 years we've owned it. The ink lasts a reasonably long time (we use Sophia ink - cheaper and just as good as HP ink). It can be used to copy even if not connected to a computer.

My wife used it for many years for our homeschool. She copied test pages out of books, made copies, and printed things from her computer.

Since we've owned it we have upgraded and have had three Canon printers which are fantastic machines. The Canon all-in-one printers we've owned have bigger paper trays, print / scan / and copy MUCH faster, have document feeders, perform duplex printing, and more. But all three have died sooner or later. When they've died we've pulled the little simple HP PSC 1210xi out of the closet and it just keeps on working like the Energizer Bunny.

When our wireless Canon printers have died we just hook this HP PSC 1210xi up to my wife's laptop, share it, and leave the laptop on. That way we can print from any of our other 4 computers in the house. So it can be "network shared" just not wireless.


Sophia Global Compatible Ink Cartridge Replacement for Canon PGI-250 and CLI-251 (4 Large Black, 2 Small Black, 2 Cyan, 2 Magenta, 2 Yellow)
Sophia Global Compatible Ink Cartridge Replacement for Canon PGI-250 and CLI-251 (4 Large Black, 2 Small Black, 2 Cyan, 2 Magenta, 2 Yellow)
Offered by SophiaGlobal-
Price: $38.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I trust Sophia for my ink needs, August 22, 2014
Ink costs are a killer aren't they. Well about a year ago I started using Sophia inks and they work just as well as the Canon inks, for much less cost. I've used Sophia cartridges now on three different printers.

I have just purchased a new Canon Pixma MX922 all-in-one printer for about $90. There was no way I was then going to order a full set of ink tanks from Canon for their asking price of $74. So I ordered this set for $39 with more than double what I would have in ink tank count with Canon. That's somewhere around 1/4 to 1/5 the cost.

I have had Canon print head failures but there is no evidence it was due to my choice of ink. But even if the ink causes a problem I will save way more than enough $ buying Sophia ink over the next year or two to replace the printer and have money left over.

I highly recommend Sophia for your ink needs.


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