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Power Spanish I Accelerated - 8 One Hour Audio Lessons - Complete Transcript/Listening Guide (English and Spanish Edition)
Power Spanish I Accelerated - 8 One Hour Audio Lessons - Complete Transcript/Listening Guide (English and Spanish Edition)
Offered by Audible, Inc. (US)

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Power Spanish Accelerated: The Best of the Top Spanish Audio Programs, August 29, 2013
I have purchased and used three different beginning level Spanish audio programs: Simon and Schuster's "Pimsleur Conversational Latin American Spanish", Macmillan Audio's "Behind the Wheel Spanish Level 1", and Language Audiobook's "Power Spanish Accelerated".

I'll tell you up front that my favorite is Power Spanish Accelerated.

With Power Spanish Accelerated, words and phrases are taught for the purpose of using them to express full thoughts, in other words, complete sentences. The program uses a lot of sentence building exercises to accomplish that. In fact, you can pretty quickly learn to build your own sentences. Power Spanish teaches you to be conversationally flexible.

The Power Spanish method somehow gets you to quickly memorize large amounts of Spanish without your being fully aware that you are doing so. There is nothing mysterious about it. It is simply a matter of constantly presenting new material while at the same time reviewing previous material. You are moving forward even during those times that you are looking back. Sometimes you look backwards but you never move backwards. Power Spanish always keeps you charging ahead and learning to speak and understand Spanish quickly - more quickly, I believe, than either of the other two programs.

Power Spanish Accelerated does an excellent job of brilliantly demonstrating the very qualities that the Pimsleur and Behind the Wheel programs sadly lack. Power Spanish features far more native Spanish speakers, a lot of creative and unique drills and exercises that give the program life and variety, and it's all presented to the learner in a very positive and upbeat tone that always keeps you motivated to learn.

Being able to communicate confidently and fluently at a basic conversational level is the desired goal of all audio language programs. The Power Spanish Accelerated audio program by Language Audiobooks is simply more challenging, more upbeat, happier, and I believe far faster and more effective at teaching the novice how to speak Spanish than Pimsleur or Behind the Wheel.

If there is a secret to learning a foreign language, that secret has to be staying with it. No language audio program will be effective if you don't use it over and over. My opinion is that Power Spanish's greatest appeal may be that you're much more likely to use it regularly simply because it's so much faster and more enjoyable than the alternatives. If you're at all serious about using an audio program to learn to speak conversational Spanish, my thumbs go up the highest for Power Spanish Accelerated due to its speed, memory retention techniques, variety, and, last but not least, its pure `enjoyability.'


Pimsleur Spanish Conversational Course - Level 1 Lessons 1-16 CD: Learn to Speak and Understand Latin American Spanish with Pimsleur Language Programs (English and Spanish Edition)
Pimsleur Spanish Conversational Course - Level 1 Lessons 1-16 CD: Learn to Speak and Understand Latin American Spanish with Pimsleur Language Programs (English and Spanish Edition)
by Paul Pimsleur
Edition: Audio CD
Price: $35.89
25 used & new from $24.57

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Decent Program, but Power Spanish Accelerated is Better, August 21, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have purchased and used three different beginning level Spanish audio programs: Simon and Schuster's "Pimsleur Conversational Latin American Spanish", Macmillan Audio's "Behind the Wheel Spanish Level 1", and Language Audiobook's "Power Spanish Accelerated". All three accomplish their purpose of teaching conversational Spanish at a basic level of fluency. But important differences do exist.

Vocabulary Building: I'd say that the Power Spanish Accelerated program gives you a lot more vocabulary bang for your language learning buck, enough there to get you through just about any basic conversational situation. The program uses a lot of sentence building exercises. You can pretty quickly learn to build your own sentences. Power Spanish teaches you to be conversationally flexible.

Structure: The Pimsleur lessons are highly structured with no real variation from the same conversational format, to the point of being rigid. The conversations are then dissected and the listener is guided through everything that was said. There is nothing wrong with that, but personally I prefer to have the target words and phrases presented to me at the start of each lesson, minus the conversation. I'd rather learn one word or phrase at a time, not one conversation at a time. I especially don't like hearing the conversations ahead of time and having to guess at the meanings before they are translated for me.

Power Spanish Accelerated, like Pimsleur, makes use of an interval memory or repetition technique. The narrator regularly returns to already-learned words and phrase. About halfway though the Power Spanish Accelerated discs it occurred to me that the Power Spanish method somehow gets you to memorize without your being fully aware that you are doing so. There is nothing mysterious about it. It is simply a matter of constantly presenting new material while at the same time reviewing previous material. You are moving forward even during those times that you are looking back. Sometimes you look backwards but you never move backwards. Power Spanish keeps you charging ahead.

I feel like I have to listen to an entire thirty minute session to accomplish what Pimsleur has predetermined that I should accomplish. I think that Power Spanish Accelerated better allows you to determine the length of your lessons.

Mood/Tone: The tone of the Power Spanish program is very positive and upbeat. It keeps my attention. Behind the Wheel is steady, but for me the low-keyed monotony of the program makes it tedious.

Variety: The Pimsleur lessons are very structured, all following the same format. Power Spanish Accelerated is sprinkled with what the narrator calls `Audio Snapshots,' where you just listen without repeating as new words are introduced. They sort of focus you on what is to come before getting you engaged. The pace is a little quicker that the usual `listen and repeat' sections. They're also a nice break from the standard `listen and repeat' approach which is inherent to all language audio programs. I especially like the Power Spanish Accelerated sections where the learner has to try to say the word or sentence before and then again after the native speaker.

The same native speakers (two, I think) accompany you throughout your Pimsleur audio experience. The Spanish on Behind the Wheel is spoken by the same male native speaker from start to finish, as far as I can tell. Only occasionally is the voice of a Spanish speaking female inserted. In contrast, Power Spanish Accelerated uses at least a half a dozen native speakers throughout its presentation, both male and female and from different Spanish-speaking countries. The back-and-forth use of several male and female native speakers makes the program more interesting, keeps my attention, and makes the learning happen faster.

My Conclusion: If there is a secret to learning a foreign language that secret has to be staying with it. No language audio program will be effective if you don't use it. Pimsleur and Behind the Wheel are both okay. But if you're serious about using an audio program to learn to speak conversational Spanish, my thumbs go up the highest for Power Spanish Accelerated. I think that its variety of words and phrases and its upbeat tone make Power Spanish Accelerated the easiest of the three programs to stay with.


Behind the Wheel Express - Spanish 1
Behind the Wheel Express - Spanish 1
by Behind the Wheel
Edition: Audio CD
Price: $19.99
8 used & new from $10.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Effective But Lacks Excitement - Prefer Power Spanish Accelerated, August 21, 2013
I have purchased and used three different beginning level Spanish audio programs: Simon and Schuster's "Pimsleur Conversational Latin American Spanish", Macmillan Audio's "Behind the Wheel Spanish Level 1", and Language Audiobook's "Power Spanish Accelerated".

To follow is my take on all three of them. The short version first, the details will follow.

I think that Behind the Wheel is an effective program. It has a relaxing quality to it, but, I'm afraid, too relaxing. It's low-keyed to the point of lacking excitement. The narrator and native speakers are good but their tone becomes a little monotonous after awhile. The program also lacks variety; it doesn't vary from its format. And there are only a couple of native speakers on it, as far as I can tell; mostly a male, a female that rarely speaks.

The Pimsleur program is a little more upbeat; still, it only uses a couple of native speakers, It sticks faithfully, but rigidly, to the same conversational format throughout.

The Power Spanish Accelerated program, however, tries hard to stay upbeat and motivational. Its use of at least a half dozen native Spanish speakers helps to accomplish that. It's `before and after' and Audio Snapshot sections lend it variety that the other two audio programs don't have. Everything is explained in English before it is modeled in Spanish, so there is no guesswork as to meanings. Its interval memory technique is designed in a way that makes reviewing previously presented material fit naturally with the current lesson.

Want the particulars? Here goes:

I would not give any of the programs thumbs down. All three accomplish their purpose of teaching conversational Spanish at a basic level of fluency. Of course, none of them will work if you don't spend enough time listening to them. Language courses, of any shape, size, or flavor, are merely guides that structure your learning in some particular way. Which one is `best' is a personal and largely subjective opinion of the listener/learner.

That said, I'll tell you up front that my favorite is Power Spanish Accelerated. Now I'll tell you why...

The Starting Gate: In terms of precision and professionalism, the folks at Pimsleur do it right. The narration is smooth and steady and the intonation is consistent. The narrator's trained voice is a pleasure to listen to. Disc 1 has a rather lengthy explanation about the Pimsleur approach to audio learning.

There is no explanation about the rationale behind the Behind the Wheel method. I like that it gets you started right away, but some introductory comments would have been informative and helpful.

Disc 1 on Power Spanish Accelerated contains a brief introduction. The narrator tells a little about what the learner can expect as he or she proceeds through the lessons. The program then gets very quickly down to business. Right out of the gate you're off and running.

Vocabulary Building: Word Up! I didn't take the time and trouble to actually count, but it seems to me that Pimsleur offers fewer words and phrases than Behind the Wheel and Power Spanish Accelerated. The Power Spanish program, especially, is very rich in vocabulary. I'd say that the Power Spanish Accelerated program gives you a lot more vocabulary bang for your language learning buck. The amount of vocabulary in Power Spanish doesn't overwhelm you, but there is enough there to get you through just about any basic conversational situation. Maybe that's why they call it `Accelerated.'

Don't get the idea that Power Spanish is all about isolated words and phrases. To the contrary, the words and phrases are taught for the purpose of using them to express full thoughts, in other words, complete sentences. The program uses a lot of sentence building exercises to accomplish that. In fact, you can pretty quickly learn to build your own sentences. Power Spanish teaches you to be conversationally flexible.

Structural: The Method to All This Language Learning Madness! All of the Pimsleur lessons begin with a short conversation. That conversation is then dissected and the listener is guided through everything that was said, one word or phrase at a time, returning to those same words and phrases several times throughout that lesson. The repetition is intentional because, as the narrator explains on disc 1, repeating new information at planned intervals is the key to long term retention.

Personally, I prefer to have the target words and phrases presented to me at the start of each lesson, minus the conversation. I suppose the Pimsleur idea is to make the lessons sound more `real life.' I would have been happier with the words and phrases standing alone. I'd rather learn one word or phrase at a time, not one conversation at a time. I especially don't like hearing the conversations ahead of time and having to guess at the meanings before they are translated for me. Just tell me the words or phrases in English, then tell me how to say them in Spanish, then help me practice them, then move on to the next lesson.

Power Spanish Accelerated, like Pimsleur, makes use of an interval memory or repetition technique. The narrator regularly returns to already-learned words and phrases. Language learning is more than just the rote memorization of lists of vocabulary words, but let's be honest, a lot of memorization is necessary to learn a new language. About halfway though the Power Spanish Accelerated discs it occurred to me that the Power Spanish method somehow gets you to memorize without your being fully aware that you are doing so. There is nothing mysterious about it. It is simply a matter of constantly presenting new material while at the same time reviewing previous material. You are moving forward even during those times that you are looking back. Sometimes you look backwards but you never move backwards. Power Spanish keeps you charging ahead.

I especially like the Power Spanish Accelerated sections where the learner has to try to say the word or sentence before and then again after the native speaker. Trying to say the word or phrase before the speaker is challenging, but not undo-able if you've been paying attention. The way that Power Spanish presents its material makes it pretty easy to pay attention. Pimsleur employs a similar technique, calling it `Anticipate and Participate.' It is also good, but I think that the Power Spanish version is a little more effective. Behind the Wheel doesn't offer anything like that.

Another thing that I liked about Power Spanish: it has what it calls `Audio Snapshot' sections where you just listen without repeating as new words are introduced. It sort of focuses you on what is to come before getting you engaged. I'll comment more about the variety in each program in a moment.

Mood/Tone: Don't Worry, Be Happy! The tone of the Power Spanish program is very positive and upbeat. It keeps the listener's attention throughout. Together, its variety of words and phrases and its upbeat tone and pace I think make Power Spanish Accelerated the easiest of the three programs to stay with. Additionally, Power Spanish takes advantage of several male and female native speakers, at least six. Power Spanish is the program that most gets and keeps my attention, which keeps me motivated, which keeps me plugging away.

Power Spanish keeps me plugging away while Behind the Wheel keeps me plodding along. Behind the Wheel is steady, but the low-keyed monotony of the program makes me feel like I'm plodding. Occasionally there is a female voice on the CDs, but, unfortunately, rarely. The program lacks variety so it's harder for me to stay interested. To me Behind the Wheel lacks cheeriness. More cheeriness would make it more fun.

The Pimsleur program, on the other hand, makes me feel locked in. I find it rigid and restricting. You have to listen to an entire thirty minute session to accomplish what the program has predetermined that you should accomplish. I think that Power Spanish Accelerated allows you to determine the length of your lessons. You can stop and then pick up later wherever in the program you want. Great for times when your ride arrives unexpectedly early or when the dental assistant announces that it's your turn.

Variety: The Spice of (Language Learning) Life! The Pimsleur lessons are very structured and they are all formatted in the same way. There are no surprises throughout the Pimsleur approach. Personally I like a few surprises, or, if not surprises, at least a break in the routine.

Power Spanish Accelerated is good at that. As I mentioned in my comments above about structure, the `listen and repeat' sections are sprinkled with what the narrator calls `Audio Snapshots.' These segments consist of several word or phrases that you just listen to without repeating. Of course I find myself repeating anyway. That's natural. But the pace is a little quicker that the usual `listen and repeat' sections. I like it. The little `Audio Snapshot' sections are a nice break from the standard `listen and repeat' approach which is inherent to all language audio programs. `Listen and repeat' is what audio programs are all about. There is no getting around that. But the `Audio Snapshots' inserted at several places along the way gives the Power Spanish program some welcome variety.

Also as previously explained, after you have gone through a section, Power Spanish gives you an English word or phrase and then prompts you to say it before the native speaker says it, and then again after. Pimsleur utilizes a similar technique, but I don't think it's quite as effective as the Power Spanish one, not to me, anyway.

Behind the Wheel employs a word by word, phrase by phrase method similar to Power Spanish Accelerated. I like that. The problem for me, as I indicated before, is that Behind the Wheel is quite monotonous. Both the narrator and native speaker speak in a low tone throughout the program. Both voices are pleasant, but the male native speaker's voice which is easy to listen to, does become rather tiresome after awhile.

All three programs use native speakers for the Spanish parts, of course. The same native speakers (two, I think) accompany you throughout your Pimsleur audio experience. Though pleasant to listen to, it is another example of what I think is the Pimsleur program's lack of variety. The Spanish on Behind the Wheel is spoken by the same male (and monotone-voiced) native speaker from start to finish, as far as I can tell. Only occasionally is the voice of a Spanish speaking female inserted.

Power Spanish Accelerated, on the other hand, uses at least a half a dozen native speakers throughout its presentation, both male and female. For me this back-and-forth use of several male and female native speakers makes the program more interesting, keeps my attention, and makes the learning happen faster.

Joy-O-Meter: Are We Having Fun Yet? Look, learning a new language is challenging. Ask anyone who has ever tried. However, learning a language doesn't have to be - indeed, should not be - boring. It should be enjoyable, fun! Why not? If it's boredom you're looking for read the tax code.

Like the Pimsleur Spanish program, Behind the Wheel uses a stiff, rigid approach with no real variation from the pattern. It is too low-keyed for my liking; it lacks enthusiasm and is rather `dry.' Power Spanish Accelerated is simply more up-beat and therefore more fun. A positive tone and fun, along with variety, help to get through the rough spots that
everyone experiences along the road to learning a new language. Power Spanish Accelerated makes the little needle on my Joy-O-Meter swing farther to the right, which makes my learning faster and more fun.

Connecting the Dots: Are We There Yet? When it comes to language audio programs, `There' means being able to communicate confidently and fluently at a basic conversational level. That's the whole point of language audio programs. If there is a secret to learning a foreign language that secret has to be staying with it. No language audio program will be effective if you don't use it. If you're at all serious about using an audio program to learn to speak conversational Spanish, my thumbs go up the highest for Power Spanish Accelerated.

Think of it in terms of connecting dots. Dot A is where you are now, knowing very little or no Spanish; Dot B is where you want to go, that is, to learn to speak Spanish at a basic conversational level of fluency. Power Spanish Accelerated draws those two dots closer together. And in my opinion it is the fastest and fun-est route that connects them!

Buena Suerte - Good Luck


Behind the Wheel - Spanish 1
Behind the Wheel - Spanish 1
by Mark Frobose
Edition: Audio CD
Price: $32.45
32 used & new from $24.24

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid Program, but Power Spanish Accelerated is More Effective, August 21, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have purchased and used three different beginning level Spanish audio programs: Simon and Schuster's "Pimsleur Conversational Latin American Spanish", Macmillan Audio's "Behind the Wheel Spanish Level 1", and Language Audiobook's "Power Spanish Accelerated".

All three are effective at teaching conversational Spanish at a basic level of fluency. But I learned more Spanish faster with Power Spanish Accelerated.

Structure: Each Pimsleur lesson begins with a short conversation which is then dissected and the listener is guided through everything that was said, one word or phrase at a time, returning to those same words and phrases several times throughout that lesson.

I'd rather have the target words and phrases presented to me at the start of each lesson, minus the conversation. I'd rather learn one word or phrase at a time, not one conversation at a time. And I don't like having to guess at meanings before I hear the words translated for me.

In the Power Spanish program, everything is explained in English before it is modeled in Spanish, so there is no guesswork as to meanings. Power Spanish emphasizes building your own original sentences. There are a lot of sentence building exercises. That makes for a lot of conversational flexibility.

I find the Pimsleur program rigid and a bit restricting. It is harder to stop midway through a thirty minute section. With Power Spanish you can stop and then pick up later pretty much wherever in the program you want.

Mood/Tone: The Power Spanish Accelerated program tries hard to stay upbeat and motivational. Behind the Wheel employs a word by word, phrase by phrase method similar to Power Spanish Accelerated. I like that. The problem for me is that Behind the Wheel is quite monotonous. It is steady, but so low-keyed that it is monotonous. To me it lacks cheeriness. More cheeriness would make it more fun.

Variety: The same native speakers (two, I think) accompany you throughout your Pimsleur audio experience. The Spanish on Behind the Wheel is spoken by the same male native speaker from start to finish, as far as I can tell. Only occasionally is the voice of a Spanish speaking female inserted.

Power Spanish takes advantage of several male and female native speakers, at least six. For me this back-and-forth use of several male and female native speakers makes the program more interesting, keeps my attention, and makes the learning happen faster.

I like the Power Spanish Accelerated sections where the learner has to try to say the word or sentence before and then again after the native speaker. Pimsleur employs a similar technique, but I think that the Power Spanish version is a little more effective.

In Power Spanish Accelerated the `listen and repeat' sections are sprinkled with what the narrator calls `Audio Snapshots.' These segments consist of several word or phrases that you just listen to without repeating. The little `Audio Snapshot' sections are a nice break from the standard `listen and repeat' approach which is inherent to all language audio programs, and give the program some welcome variety.

Power Spanish Accelerated, like Pimsleur, makes use of an interval memory or repetition technique. Power Spanish Accelerated presents new material while at the same time it reviews previous material. You are move forward even during those times that you are look back. Sometimes you look backwards but you never move backwards.

My Conclusion: Behind the Wheel has a relaxing quality to it, but, I'm afraid, too relaxing. It's low-keyed to the point of lacking excitement. The narrator and native speakers are good but their tone becomes a little monotonous after awhile.

Pimsleur is a little more upbeat, but its lessons are very structured and they are all formatted in the same way. There is no real break in its routine.

Power Spanish makes use of at least a half dozen native Spanish speakers. It's `before and after' and `Audio Snapshot' sections give it more variety than the other two programs. It is the program that most gets and keeps my attention. Together, its variety of words and phrases and its upbeat tone and pace I think make Power Spanish Accelerated the easiest of the three programs to stay with.


Behind the Wheel - Mandarin Chinese 1
Behind the Wheel - Mandarin Chinese 1
by Behind the Wheel
Edition: Audio CD
Price: $49.95
13 used & new from $21.26

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clear and Concise Entry Level Course, April 8, 2010
GENERAL COMMENTS

Behind the Wheel Mandarin Chinese by Macmillan Audio is the only Asian language course that I have ever had exposure to, so I'm no expert. I just know that this Macmillan course taught me a lot - and I mean a lot - of Mandarin Chinese, including how to quickly speak simple yet original sentences. It also taught me a lot about Mandarin Chinese. I also think this eight CD course makes conversational fluency in Mandarin a very reachable goal.

I would definitely recommend it for anyone who wants to learn to speak some Mandarin. It's also great for those who are just curious about Asian languages or for anyone brave enough to step out of his or her Indo European `language comfort zone' and learn a little about what for most Westerners is truly a `foreign' foreign language.

SPECIFIC COMMENTS

In college I took courses in Spanish, French, and Italian. Since then I've wanted to study a language that is totally outside of the Indo European group that comprises my own linguistic heritage.

To that end, I purchased a copy of Mandarin Chinese, Level 1. Part of publisher McMillan's Behind the Wheel foreign language instruction series, this beginner's level course uses the phonetic spelling called Pinyin instead of traditional Chinese characters. The instructional goal of this Behind the Wheel course is spoken, not written, Mandarin Chinese.

I wanted to learn to speak a little Mandarin. I was also curious about the sounds, syntax, and grammatical structure of this Asian language. My goal was linguistic familiarity.

It was interesting to compare Mandarin's initials and finals with the Germanic and Romanic vowels and consonants. I was especially fascinated with the five rising and falling tones of Mandarin Chinese. Ever heard of measure words? It has nothing to do with feet and inches. How similar yet how different are Asiatic and European languages.

Though this course is not highly structured in a conventional classroom sense, the authors did recognize the necessity of teaching some grammatical structure. This is probably inescapable for those who come from a European or American background linguistically. The booklet that accompanies this course teaches lessons on constructing basic sentences, using pronouns, and on forming the past, present, and future tenses. Nothing extremely complicated, just the stuff that's necessary for basic communication.

All of the normal language instruction stuff is there, too: words about time and weather and color and transportation and places and food. The booklet teaches helpful phrases, and how to ask and answer common questions - all the things you need to know to get along.

And, of course, there are the CD's. Wow! This is not the Spanish or French that so many of us took in high school. No cognate words here to help you along. Asian languages have a way of intimidating Western language speakers. I was pretty intimidated at first. I'll admit it. But it got easier as I went along. After listening to the first two discs I began to get a `feel' for the language. For the sound of it, I mean. Listening and speaking became noticeably easier with each progressive disc.

I would encourage anyone with an interest in the Mandarin Chinese language to give this concise yet thorough introductory course a GO.


Behind the Wheel - Spanish 3
Behind the Wheel - Spanish 3
by Behind the Wheel
Edition: Audio CD
Price: $29.97
31 used & new from $19.12

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Behind the Wheel" a Straight Road to Fluency, March 3, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
My General Impressions:
I give this course a strong four-and-a-half stars and an enthusiastic two-thumbs-up.
To speak the Spanish language properly - and truly fluently - the non-native speaker must understand and be able to employ that language's complex verb constructions; especially the moods and meanings that the Castilian subjunctive tense so precisely and poetically expresses. The Macmillan's audio course entitled "Behind the Wheel Spanish - Level 3" was created with language fluency in mind.

I really liked the way the native speakers model the practice phrases and sentences. The phrases or sentences are said at moderate speed the first time, then at a considerably faster pace the second time. This enables the learner to accurately emulate not only the pronunciation but also the real-time pace at which the language is spoken.

If fluency is the goal, Macmillan's Behind the Wheel Spanish 3 audio method will measurably improve the serious student's understanding of and comfort in using the subjunctive and other moods and tenses as they manifest themselves in the Spanish language. For lots of intensive practice with advanced verb tenses, this course is worth a listen.

My Detailed and Specific Comments:
Starting with the subjunctive tense, the eight CDs include practice with the present and pluperfect tenses, the conditional tense and side-by-side comparisons of the preterit and imperfect past tenses in both their indicative and subjunctive forms. Reflexive forms of verbs are reviewed. There are also periodic reminders about choosing the proper verb `person' when the subject pronoun is not specified. Loads of vocabulary words as well as dozens of common phrases, figures of speech, and expressions are sprinkled throughout the lessons.

This course is not Spanish 101. The listener is expected to be at a high intermediate or advanced level. Mastery of infinitives and verb conjugations in the indicative tenses is necessary to be able to understand the orthographic changes required by the subjunctive or pluperfect ones. This course was designed for those who are well-grounded in verb conjugation basics and wish to take their knowledge - and fluency - to a higher level.

I think that a brief - very brief, maybe eight or ten-page - written explanation of each of the subjunctive and other tenses and their proper uses would be helpful. Sometimes it is helpful to read an explanation at one's own pace, as many times as necessary, and then take a few minutes to reflect on it, to let it sink in, instead of having to think fast in order to keep up with the narrative or to rerun the tract a dozen times, an inconvenience if listening while driving.

I also wish that the print of the twenty-four page transcript booklet would have been considerably larger. I would have gladly paid an extra buck for a booklet with forty-four, instead of only twenty-four, pages.


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