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At Home at the Zoo - Acting Edition
At Home at the Zoo - Acting Edition
by Edward Albee
Edition: Paperback
Price: $8.10
39 used & new from $1.75

3.0 out of 5 stars Unfortunate Expansion and Adaptation of a Classic, August 25, 2014
Written in 1958, THE ZOO STORY was a startling one-act play in which two men meet by chance at a bench in the park. Although it was originally rejected by American producers, within a remarkably short span of time it became a modern classic, and Edward Albee was recognized as a major new voice in world theatre. Albee would go on to create a number of famous one-act plays and then explode in the American conciousness with WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF, which was followed by a series of critically lauded and commercially viable plays including A DELICATE BALANCE and THREE TALL WOMEN, among others. Some fifty years after its debut, he returned to THE ZOO STORY, creating a first act and adapting the original into a second act. Retitled AT HOME AT THE ZOO, the play premiered in 2004 to tepid response.

The first act, titled 'Homelife,' introduces Peter and Ann. They are a 'successful' upper middle class couple on the far side of middle age. Peter is a publishing executive and they have two daughters. As the play begins, Ann interrupts Peter's reading to tell him they "need to talk." The ensuing conversation is disjointed, for Peter and Ann tend to talk at each other instead of with each other, and it becomes obvious that they have fallen into the habit of hiding behind courtesy. Even so, Ann eventually makes it clear that she is sexually bored. Peter, somewhat to his own surprise, recalls an unsavory college incident that may explain why is lovemaking lacks animal spark. Ann is titilated by the story, but they do not seem able to break through each other's barriers, and Peter leaves the house to continue reading in the park.

The second act is essentially THE ZOO STORY, slightly revised and brought up to date. Peter is sitting on a park bench, reading, when he is approached by Jerry, who is something of a social opposite. Peter at least has the surface of success: a career, financial stability, a marriage, two daughters. Jerry has none of these things: he is poor to the point of destitution, has no family, no meaningful relationships. Jerry forces a conversation on Peter, and as in 'Homelife,' the characters have significant difficulty communicating. Ultimately, Jerry unwinds a monologue of everything that is wrong with his life, and when Peter attempts to break away, he discovers that Jerry has a frightening agenda.

The essential problem with AT HOME AT THE ZOO is that the first act is a trivial dialogue written below Albee's ability and the second act is the brilliant THE ZOO STORY, which needs nothing beyond itself. Amazingly, once Albee wrote 'Homelife' and attached it to THE ZOO STORY, he refused to allow professional productions of THE ZOO STORY in its original form, thereby cutting the throat of his first great theatrical achievement. It is very, very strange, and one can only wonder whatever possessed Albee to wreck this one-act masterpiece. 'Homelife' is merely a tired rehash of Albee's battling couples. But THE ZOO STORY is an essential. Skip the first and read the second.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


The Old Dark House
The Old Dark House
DVD ~ Tom Poston
Price: $14.99
23 used & new from $13.90

2.0 out of 5 stars Ho Hum And Minus Some, August 23, 2014
This review is from: The Old Dark House (DVD)
Vaguely based on J.B. Priestly's 1927 novel BENIGHTED, James Whales' 1932 film starring Boris Karloff was a comic take on the already cliched "old dark house" genre--and it became something of a classic. Producer-Director William Castle revisited the material in 1963, and the result was significantly less inspired. With a script by Robert Dillon and starring Tom Poston, Janette Scott, and Robert Morley, this version leans harder toward comedy--but sadly, it is comedy that doesn't really come off.

Tom Penderel (Tom Poston) is an American car salesman in London, where he shares a flat with Caspar Femm (Peter Bull.) Caspar desperately urges Tom to visit him at his country estate--but when arrives Tom finds that Caspar is dead and his very odd family are forced to live under unhappy terms of a very odd will. Tom is attracted to both good girl Cecily (Janette Scott) and bad girl Morgana (Fenella Fielding), but it seems clear that someone in the family is trying to kill him, not to mention all the others as well. There are various comic death traps and several comic deaths before the killer is exposed, but none of it is greatly inspired.

Rumor has it that Boris Karloff, who appeared in the original, turned down a role in the film because he thought the script stank--and this was at a point in his career when he was doing Roger Corman-type films, which says a great deal indeed. To say THE OLD DARK HOUSE is uninspired is an understatement. It isn't awful enough to be funny, and you might get a giggle or two out of on a sleepless night, but it's not something most people will care to sit through, much less return to. Ho hum and minus some.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


A Delicate Balance
A Delicate Balance
by Edward Albee
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.51
56 used & new from $5.71

5.0 out of 5 stars Mysterious, Odd, Inexplicable, August 21, 2014
This review is from: A Delicate Balance (Paperback)
Edward Albee (b. 1928) is best known for the landmark WHOSE AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?--but he is also the author of numerous other distinguished plays, including TINY ALICE, ALL OVER, and THREE TALL WOMEN. First performed in 1966, A DELICATE BALANCE was an immediate critical success, and although it has not been as popular with the public as some other Albee works, it has been widely studied, performed, and frequently revived.

The play is performed in three acts, with two scenes in the second act. It is played on a single unit set, displaying an upscale living area on the first floor of a wealthy home. The cast includes four women and two men. Three of the women and the two men are in their fifties. The fourth woman is in her thirties. The script is extremely demanding and requires expert players; past performers have included Jessica Tandy, Hume Cronyn, Elaine Stritch, John Lithgow, and Martha Plimpton, among others.

Many of Albee's plays have an "experimental" quality, and this is particularly true of A DELICATE BALANCE, which does not have a cohesive plot and which possesses an open-ended quality in which little is explained and we are left to wonder at the characters' motivations. In Act One, Agnes and Tobias, an wealthy but aging couple, are seen having drinks after dinner. Agnes' manner drifts from vague to sharp; Tobias, however, seems permanently vague. They are interrupted by Claire, Agnes' sister, who lives with them. Claire is an alcoholic and Agnes despises her. They argue in a nasty but oddly random sort of way until Harry and Edna, their best friends, arrive. They have suddenly become frightened in their own home, and, running from their unspecified fears, have come unannounced to spend the night.

In Act Two, the situation is complicated by the arrival of Julia, Tobias and Agnes' daughter. Julia has left her fourth husband and is outraged to find Harry and Edna in her room. As the play progresses through Act Two and Act Three, the various characters begin to assume each other's identies. This is particularly true of Edna, who becomes remarkably like Agnes in terms of speech and manner. In a very real sense they battle over territory, over who has the right to stay in the house and who does not. At the end of the play, Harry and Edna go their own home--but the fear that drove them is never specified, and we are left to suspect it is a fear of the status quo, ennui, and emotional emptiness that seems to characterize all the personalities in the play.

A DELICATE BALANCE is a fascinating read, and in the hands of a master cast it would no doubt be fascinating to watch. But this is not an easy play, for there are few things in terms of character or plot that you can cling to. Which ultimately seems to be the point of the play as a whole. Recommended, but not a light read.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


A Delicate Balance
A Delicate Balance
Offered by Penguin Group (USA) LLC
Price: $9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Mysterious, Odd, and Inexplicable, August 20, 2014
Edward Albee (b. 1928) is best known for the landmark WHOSE AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?--but he is also the author of numerous other distinguished plays, including TINY ALICE, ALL OVER, and THREE TALL WOMEN. First performed in 1966, A DELICATE BALANCE was an immediate critical success, and although it has not been as popular with the public as some other Albee works, it has been widely studied, performed, and frequently revived.

The play is performed in three acts, with two scenes in the second act. It is played on a single unit set, displaying an upscale living area on the first floor of a wealthy home. The cast includes four women and two men. Three of the women and the two men are in their fifties. The fourth woman is in her thirties. The script is extremely demanding and requires expert players; past performers have included Jessica Tandy, Hume Cronyn, Elaine Stritch, John Lithgow, and Martha Plimpton, among others.

Many of Albee's plays have an "experimental" quality, and this is particularly true of A DELICATE BALANCE, which does not have a cohesive plot and which possesses an open-ended quality in which little is explained and we are left to wonder at the characters' motivations. In Act One, Agnes and Tobias, an wealthy but aging couple, are seen having drinks after dinner. Agnes' manner drifts from vague to sharp; Tobias, however, seems permanently vague. They are interrupted by Claire, Agnes' sister, who lives with them. Claire is an alcoholic and Agnes despises her. They argue in a nasty but oddly random sort of way until Harry and Edna, their best friends, arrive. They have suddenly become frightened in their own home, and, running from their unspecified fears, have come unannounced to spend the night.

In Act Two, the situation is complicated by the arrival of Julia, Tobias and Agnes' daughter. Julia has left her fourth husband and is outraged to find Harry and Edna in her room. As the play progresses through Act Two and Act Three, the various characters begin to assume each other's identies. This is particularly true of Edna, who becomes remarkably like Agnes in terms of speech and manner. In a very real sense they battle over territory, over who has the right to stay in the house and who does not. At the end of the play, Harry and Edna go their own home--but the fear that drove them is never specified, and we are left to suspect it is a fear of the status quo, ennui, and emotional emptiness that seems to characterize all the personalities in the play.

A DELICATE BALANCE is a fascinating read, and in the hands of a master cast it would no doubt be fascinating to watch. But this is not an easy play, for there are few things in terms of character or plot that you can cling to. Which ultimately seems to be the point of the play as a whole. Recommended, but not a light read.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


Master Harold . . . And The Boys (Penguin Plays)
Master Harold . . . And The Boys (Penguin Plays)
by Athol Fugard
Edition: Paperback
161 used & new from $1.01

4.0 out of 5 stars You Can't Fly Kites On Rainy Days, August 11, 2014
Originally staged in 1982, "MASTER HAROLD" ... AND THE BOYS has a cast of three: two black men, both about thirty years old; and one white teenage boy, about seventeen. Set in 1950 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, the actors must speak with noticeable South African accents. The stage consists of a single unit set, which depicts an ordinary and rather unimpressive diner. There is no intermission.

The action occurs on a wet and windy afternoon when there are no customers. Sam and Willie are cleaning the floor, amusing themselves with personal conversation as they work, Sam trying to instruct Willie on the fine art of ballroom dancing: a competition is coming up. Their conversation is interrupted by the arrival of 'Master Harold,' better known as Hally, a seventeen year old white school. His mother owns the diner; Sam and Willie are her employees. The characters are gradually defined, Sam as commonsense and kindly, Willie as a bit quick to become frustrated, and Hally as a typically arrogant teenager. In spite of class divisions and the ingrained racism of apartheid, it is clear that there is a great friendship between the three men. Their relationship goes back to Hally's childhood, and during their conversation Hally recalls an occasion when Sam made him kite--a magical thing, it seemed to Hally at the time.

It gradually transpires that Hally's father, who is crippled and alcoholic, is in the hospital, and Halley's mother has gone to bring him home. Hally is upset by this news, and as the play progresses he becomes increasingly abusive toward Sam and Willie, taking out his frustrations with his father and mother on them and in the process demonstrating the racism of the apartheid, which gives him significant power over the two older men. Ultimately, the relationship between "Master Harold" and "the boys" takes a sharp turn from which there is likely no return.

"MASTER HAROLD" ... AND THE BOYS has been revisited in stage revival and at least two films over the years, and it makes a powerful statement. Even so, I found the character development rather obvious and at times a bit abrupt. This is probably something that plays out better on the stage than on the page; even so, a notable play whether read or seen.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


Master Harold and the Boys (Vintage International)
Master Harold and the Boys (Vintage International)
by Athol Fugard
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.43
95 used & new from $4.99

4.0 out of 5 stars You Can't Fly Kites On Rainy Days, August 11, 2014
Originally staged in 1982, "MASTER HAROLD" ... AND THE BOYS has a cast of three: two black men, both about thirty years old; and one white teenage boy, about seventeen. Set in 1950 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, the actors must speak with noticeable South African accents. The stage consists of a single unit set, which depicts an ordinary and rather unimpressive diner. There is no intermission.

The action occurs on a wet and windy afternoon when there are no customers. Sam and Willie are cleaning the floor, amusing themselves with personal conversation as they work, Sam trying to instruct Willie on the fine art of ballroom dancing: a competition is coming up. Their conversation is interrupted by the arrival of 'Master Harold,' better known as Hally, a seventeen year old white school. His mother owns the diner; Sam and Willie are her employees. The characters are gradually defined, Sam as commonsense and kindly, Willie as a bit quick to become frustrated, and Hally as a typically arrogant teenager. In spite of class divisions and the ingrained racism of apartheid, it is clear that there is a great friendship between the three men. Their relationship goes back to Hally's childhood, and during their conversation Hally recalls an occasion when Sam made him kite--a magical thing, it seemed to Hally at the time.

It gradually transpires that Hally's father, who is crippled and alcoholic, is in the hospital, and Halley's mother has gone to bring him home. Hally is upset by this news, and as the play progresses he becomes increasingly abusive toward Sam and Willie, taking out his frustrations with his father and mother on them and in the process demonstrating the racism of the apartheid, which gives him significant power over the two older men. Ultimately, the relationship between "Master Harold" and "the boys" takes a sharp turn from which there is likely no return.

"MASTER HAROLD" ... AND THE BOYS has been revisited in stage revival and at least two films over the years, and it makes a powerful statement. Even so, I found the character development rather obvious and at times a bit abrupt. This is probably something that plays out better on the stage than on the page; even so, a notable play whether read or seen.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


Master Harold and the Boys: A Drama 3rd (third) Edition by Fugard, Athol published by Samuel French (2010)
Master Harold and the Boys: A Drama 3rd (third) Edition by Fugard, Athol published by Samuel French (2010)
17 used & new from $14.84

4.0 out of 5 stars You Can't Fly Kites On Rainy Days, August 8, 2014
Originally staged in 1982, "MASTER HAROLD" ... AND THE BOYS has a cast of three: two black men, both about thirty years old; and one white teenage boy, about seventeen. Set in 1950 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, the actors must speak with noticeable South African accents. The stage consists of a single unit set, which depicts an ordinary and rather unimpressive diner. There is no intermission.

The action occurs on a wet and windy afternoon when there are no customers. Sam and Willie are cleaning the floor, amusing themselves with personal conversation as they work, Sam trying to instruct Willie on the fine art of ballroom dancing: a competition is coming up. Their conversation is interrupted by the arrival of 'Master Harold,' better known as Hally, a seventeen year old white school. His mother owns the diner; Sam and Willie are her employees. The characters are gradually defined, Sam as commonsense and kindly, Willie as a bit quick to become frustrated, and Hally as a typically arrogant teenager. In spite of class divisions and the ingrained racism of apartheid, it is clear that there is a great friendship between the three men. Their relationship goes back to Hally's childhood, and during their conversation Hally recalls an occasion when Sam made him kite--a magical thing, it seemed to Hally at the time.

It gradually transpires that Hally's father, who is crippled and alcoholic, is in the hospital, and Halley's mother has gone to bring him home. Hally is upset by this news, and as the play progresses he becomes increasingly abusive toward Sam and Willie, taking out his frustrations with his father and mother on them and in the process demonstrating the racism of the apartheid, which gives him significant power over the two older men. Ultimately, the relationship between "Master Harold" and "the boys" takes a sharp turn from which there is likely no return.

"MASTER HAROLD" ... AND THE BOYS has been revisited in stage revival and at least two films over the years, and it makes a powerful statement. Even so, I found the character development rather obvious and at times a bit abrupt. This is probably something that plays out better on the stage than on the page; even so, a notable play whether read or seen.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


Dracula (Deane and Balerston)
Dracula (Deane and Balerston)
by Hamilton Deane
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.95
47 used & new from $8.95

5.0 out of 5 stars There ARE Such Things: The 1920s Classic, August 8, 2014
Hamilton Deane, the leader of an English theatrical company, is said to have written the script for DRACULA from the Bram Stoker novel in four weeks--and we owe much of how we think of the Count to Deane's eye for the theatrical, for it was he who transformed the character from Stoker's original monster into the suave, elegant, and sexually brooding creation we have seen repeated in novels, plays, and films ever since.

First performed in 1924, the original English production proved an audience favorite, touring for three years before it even arrived in London. In 1927 John L. Balderston did a re-write of Deane's script, altering the characters and their mode of speech for an American audience. The resulting play was a smash, with Bela Lugosi a sensation in the title role, and like the English production it was extremely popular on tour. The play was eventually sold to Universal in Hollywood, and with Lugosi and Edward Van Sloan repeating their roles as Dracula and Van Helsing, it became the first in a highly successful wave of horror films of the 1930s. In 1977 the play received a Broadway revival starring Frank Langella and once again proved extremely popular, with several touring productions, an English revival, and a film version following.

The play requires six men, two women, and three stage sets: the library in Dr. Seward's sanitorium; Lucy's Boudoir at the same location; and an underground vault beneath the sanitorium. The play is in three acts, and the library set is repeated from Act One to Act Three. Even in the 1920s the play was a highly technical production, and the script includes some forty pages of production notes ranging from lighting to the construction and operation of the bat to costuming. Many of the script demands would be daunting for a major theatre, much less a community or college theatre, but the play has been successfully performed on small stages and with make-shift effects for years.

Unlike the novel, which is a sprawling creation, the script is surprisingly compact. It is distinctly of the 1920s, and it has a distinctly antiquated, at times slightly clunky quality--which is actually part of the play's charm, and while the script is talky it does in fact move at a lightning pace, with plenty of special effects to surprise the audience along the way. The first act quickly establishes the basic premise: Seward's daughter Lucy, engaged to marry John, has fallen prey to a vampire, Count Dracula. He is exposed by Dr. Van Helsing, and the second and third acts essentially unravel the strangeness of Dracula himself. The conclusion is startling: just as Van Helsing, Seward, and John seem on the verge of destroying the vampire, he mysteriously vanishes from the stage, and the trio are forced to hunt him down in a hidden, underground lair.

Critics of the 1920s and 1930s were not overly fond of the script or the play itself, but then and now audiences have loved it, and with good reason: it is fast-paced, it wildly melodramatic, it is just a little campy, it really does provide a few unexpected thrills, and on the whole it's just a tremendous amount of fun. Fun to read, fun to perform, and fun to see. Recommended.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


Night
Night
Offered by Macmillan
Price: $3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Matter of Fact Horrors, August 7, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Night (Kindle Edition)
NIGHT was among the first widely read accounts of a Holocaust concentration camp survivor. It was originally over eight hundred pages in Yiddish. Weisel worked with the material, re-writing and editing it, first into a two hundred forty five page version published in Argenitina, then into a one hundred seventy page version published in France. NIGHT reached its final form with its one hundred sixteen page publication in 1960 in English in the United States. Wiesel declares that every word of the work is true and he describes NIGHT as his "testimony." Critics tend to feel that the basis for the work is factual, but that Wiesel's long and meticulous re-write and editing has transformed what would have been simple fact into a work of art open to a variety of understandings. Whatever the case, the English-language publication was among the first widely read personal accounts of the Holocaust, and it continues to draw both readers and praise to the present day.

The book is written in an unexpectedly matter of fact tone and lacks any trace of self-pity. As such it has an quality that is very difficult to define, one in which most human emotion seems to have been burned away by the experiences the writer endured. Elie Wiesel was born in 1928 in Sighet, a fairly large town first claimed by Romania and later by Hungary. Wiesel writes that he was a studious boy, deeply religious, and the son of respected people. They had heard rumors of how Jews were treated by Germans, but the war seemed very far away, and the stories were incredible to them--even when they were told by a man well known to the Jewish community. The process was fairly slow, with Jews forced to wear the Star of David, prohibited from this and that, and finally forced to live in two "ghettos" in the city. Then, in May 1944, the Jews of Sighet were deported to Auschwitz. Wiesel was sixteen at the time. He would spend about year in various camps before arriving at Buchenwald, where he was liberated by Allied Forces in 1945. When he saw himself in a mirror for the first time since his incarceration, he was horrified by the reflection, which seemed to be that of a living corpse.

The book has an abrupt and episodic nature, but most of it focuses on Wiesel's relationship with his father Schlomo Wiesel, and how the two men successfully stayed together during their time in the camps, and how the two men less successfully attempted to care for each other. Although NIGHT is filled with horrors, the ultimate one occurs when the grinding hell of the camp system causes Wiesel to reject feeling for his father as a hinderance to his own survival. Wiesel is also prompted to question God, and whether God exists, and if so how God can accept the Nazi's systematic destruction of the Jews. As one individual cynically comments to Wiesel in NIGHT, he believes in Hitler--because Hitler has kept every promise he ever made to the Jews.

There are moments of light scattered in the work--stars in the darkness--a Frenchwoman who risks herself to encourage Wiesel, a friend whose dying act is a gift of music--but for the most part NIGHT is night indeed, and there is no escape. For all its brevity, it is painful to read, difficult to grasp, and incredibly frightening in the ordinary tone in which it is told. The book is published with a preface by Wiesel, a forward by Francois Mauriac, and the text of Wiesel's 1986 speech in acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Strongly recommended.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


Dracula's Guest
Dracula's Guest
Price: $0.00

3.0 out of 5 stars A Collection of Minor Stories, August 5, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dracula's Guest (Kindle Edition)
Bram Stoker (1847-1912) is known the world over as the author of DRACULA, one of the Victorian era's most celebrated novels, certainly one of the horror genre's foundational works. It was not, however, his only work; Stoker also wrote at least eleven other novels and novellas and any number of short stories, none of them as widely known or celebrated as his masterwork. DRACULA'S GUEST, often titled DRACULA'S GUEST AND OTHER WEIRD STORIES, collects the title piece and eight unrelated stories.

"Dracula's Guest" is generally thought to be an episode Stoker wrote for inclusion in DRACULA--an episode that was cut during the editing process. Well, maybe, maybe not; a good many critics have noted that it is quite unlike DRACULA in tone and that it is difficult to see where the piece would have fit in the novel. Whatever the case, the story concerns an unnamed traveler, possibly Johnathan Harker, who is traveling in Germany on Walpurgis Night, and very foolishly leaves his coach to stroll down a lane of unsavory reputation. A ruined town, a cemetery, a violent storm, a wolf, and and an unexpected rescue follow, but quite frankly I wasn't impressed by it.

Probably the best of the stories that follow is "The Judge's House," the story of student Malcom Malcolmson, who seeks out an isolated town and further still an isolated house in which to study. He is warned that the house was once home to a judge notorious for his excessive sentences, but he pays the warnings no mind ... until he finds the house infested by a large rat with blazing eyes. Well written and distinctly creepy, "The Judge's House" seems similar in plot and even tone to Edgar Allen Poe, and it also seems to anticipate various works by H.P. Lovecraft.

"The Burial of the Rats" is disturbingly atmospheric, the story of an Englishman who desperately seeks to escape robbery and murder in the slums of Paris. "A Dream of Red Hands" also has considerable atmosphere, and so too does "Crooken Sands," which is surprisingly funny until an unsettling twist in the final pages. But the remaining stories are not especially memorable. A black cat furiously follows a tourist into a historical torture chamber in "The Squaw," and the results are hardly unexpected. "The Secret of Growing Gold" also seems to have a Poe-ish quality in its tale of a woman wronged, but it is none the better for that. "The Gipsy Prophecy" and "The Coming of Abel Behenna" are mere Victorian melodrama.

Ultimately, DRACULA'S GUEST AND OTHER WEIRD STORIES is really a collection best left to those who enjoy Victorian literature in general and Bram Stoker in particular. They are entertaining enough in their way, but I won't be sitting up at night over any of them.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer


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