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Genevieve Kineke "feminine-genius" RSS Feed (New England)
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Feminization of American Culture
Feminization of American Culture
by Ann Douglas
Edition: Hardcover
28 used & new from $5.45

5.0 out of 5 stars Revealing how early the "woman's perspective" took hold, January 12, 2015
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This phenomenal book is long, but requires a thoughtful reading, because what was evident to Ann Douglas concerning the 19th century in America is exacerbated today. I have written extensively on the topic from a Catholic perspective (feminine-genius.com) but will have to tweak many of my assumptions -- beginning with the misguided notion that "feminisation of culture was a 20th century project." By the turn of that century, it was long underway--perhaps irreversibly so!


Treason: A Catholic Novel of Elizabethan England
Treason: A Catholic Novel of Elizabethan England
Price: $9.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Treason Then and Now, April 10, 2014
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This story encompasses one small village and a mere seven days, but there is enough breadth and scope to create a memorable saga. The characters all struggle, which makes them compelling. There are no cardboard saints or simplistic villains. Surely some are more self-aware and noble, but the value in this book is that it can be instructive for our difficult days ahead, because once again marriage—the primordial sacrament—is causing division.

Jesus rebuked the Jews for their hardness of heart about the indissolubility of marriage, Protestants long ago parted company with the Catholic Church about divorce and remarriage, many Christian confessions have made peace with same-sex unions, and the rest of the world hardly lifts and eyebrow over cohabitation, promiscuity, and polygamy. The Church stands alone in defending the bond, and her members wonder how to navigate a perilous landscape that is both unfamiliar and all too familiar.

Our Lord said, “If the world hates you, realize that it hated me first” (John 15:18). While we must pray about how best to express the truth, we cannot be shocked when the truth about chastity and marriage is met with derision, rage, and even violence. It’s a privilege to suffer for the truth, as the characters in Treason show, and it would be an excellent meditation on the inevitable conflicts to come.


An Excellent Mystery: The Eleventh Chronicle of Brother Cadfael (Brother Cadfael Mysteries)
An Excellent Mystery: The Eleventh Chronicle of Brother Cadfael (Brother Cadfael Mysteries)
by Ellis Peters
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
59 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Ends with a zinger!, August 20, 2013
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A long-standing fan of Ellis Peters, I was especially delighted with this book. Take your time, savour it, and revel in the sweet ending.


The Allergen-Free Baker's Handbook
The Allergen-Free Baker's Handbook
by Cybele Pascal
Edition: Paperback
Price: $19.95
84 used & new from $3.38

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars God's gift to people with allergies!, February 4, 2012
I struggled for a year with dairy, gluten, and soy allergies before finding this book, and I've converted all of my friends who used to make fun of the food I ate to allergen-friendly eating! The recipes are easy, and you'd never guess that they were missing what most people say they can't live with out. They are all delicious!

All the recipes are kid-tested and approved, and it shows.

I highly recommend it for anyone with allergies and a sweet tooth. Or actually just anyone with a sweet tooth.


Eucharist (Catholic Spirituality for Adults)
Eucharist (Catholic Spirituality for Adults)
by Robert E. Barron
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.87
104 used & new from $4.39

49 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Communion Without Sacrifice, April 8, 2010
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There can be no doubt that Fr Barron is one of the most dynamic preachers in our midst, illustrating his catechesis with incisive critiques of modern cultural offerings, but always grounding his explanations with the deepest grasp of ageless Catholic teachings. Thus it was no surprise that Eucharist was both a delight to read and a penetrating look at the "Messianic banquet" (p. 141) to which we are all invited.

While the book is a straight-forward look at the Eucharist, this particular review is directed specifically towards women, who need to consider the truths of the faith with an ever-present awareness of their feminine vocation. The essence of that vocation is to live as an icon of Holy Mother Church--virgin, bride and mother--fully rejoicing in the nuptial backdrop that gives depth to our relationship with the Creator

I found three portions of the book extraordinarily edifying as I considered them through the lens of womanhood, beginning with his beautiful summary of the gift of self offered in Karen Blixen's short story, Babette's Feast. The key point Fr Barron made was that there can be no communion in a fallen world without sacrifice. Truly, we understand this concept as it applies to Jesus' gift of self on the cross, but the same truth applies to us in relation to our families--and to every opportunity for communion that we provide in our domestic church. The sacrifice on Calvary is repeated in our efforts to create communion amidst the joys and trials in family life, in our places of work and among all those with whom we come in contact on a daily basis.

Secondly, the author takes great pains to explain the competing views of the Eucharist other than transubstantiation, and he makes a difficult topic manageable. He receives their arguments in good faith, and then explains why they cannot stand as the true explanation of what is happening on the altar, culminating with the explaining the profound effect that words have on being. All readers will benefit by this section, but women in particular must draw an additional meaning from the text. "Whatever happens, therefore ... it reminds us that the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist is a consequence of the power of the word" (p. 131). Women, I believe, are intimately familiar with the power of words, and although we do not confect the Eucharist, we have tremendous influence with the way we speak. We do this for good, in the case of the blessings and words of encouragement we bestow, or for evil, when we condemn, tear down or curse with our over-hasty or scathing judgments. We also carry deeply within us the burden of others' words to us, which we need to forgive in order to find true freedom.

Finally, I discovered a third treasure that we can bring into our relationships with others, especially those for whom we have the responsibility of forming. This point concerned the essential Catholic truth, not only that the body and spirit are a cohesive whole, but that God works through his creation in a delicate and respectful way. Thus, Fr Barron describes it (using the thought of Robert Sokolowski) as "the noncompetitive presence of God within an aspect of nature he has made" (p. 133). It is adequately explained even for those without a philosophical background, and it should pierce the heart of any woman who loves deeply, plants seeds of wisdom for the edification of others, and prays intensely for conversions of heart to this most loving God.

Everyone benefits when we have a deeper, richer understanding of this great gift of God, but women in particular can meditate on their call to live the Holy Mass, to absorb the lessons about generosity and sacrifice, and to transform our small pockets of humanity with the leaven of love. Ultimately, after partaking of this Divine Feast we are all called to go in peace, and with a better understanding of how the Incarnation is prolonged through the Real Presence, we will then grasp our feminine vocation, which is to give flesh to his cherished bride.

________________

Genevieve Kineke is the author of The Authentic Catholic Woman (Servant Books) and the editor of [...]
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 20, 2015 4:41 PM PST


Miss Vickie's Kettle Cooked Potato Chips, Sea Salt & Vinegar, 1.375-Ounce Large Single Serve Bags (Pack of 64)
Miss Vickie's Kettle Cooked Potato Chips, Sea Salt & Vinegar, 1.375-Ounce Large Single Serve Bags (Pack of 64)
Price: $37.35
2 used & new from $37.35

5.0 out of 5 stars snack connoisseur, December 11, 2008
These are by far the best salt and vinegar chips I have ever eaten. They have just enough salt and just enough vinegar to give you that tongue turning taste without the awful vinegar aftertaste. The sea salt gives them a natural taste, and they're much healthier than your average salt and vinegar. Two thumbs up!!


Women and the Koran: The Status of Women in Islam
Women and the Koran: The Status of Women in Islam
by Anwar Hekmat
Edition: Hardcover
24 used & new from $19.15

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars You must counter the facts, October 7, 2008
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Those who disparage this book say that to criticise Islam is blasphemous -- that doesn't counter the facts that the author offered about the origins of this religion. Those who repeat the claim that Islam freed women, likewise, didn't counter his facts that show that the cultures previous to Islam offered more freedom for women, and the adoption of this religion inhibited those freedoms. Some say that women are equal to men in Islam, which ignores the suras that the author provides which contradicts the claim. Most importantly, some attack the book by showing the depravity of the West -- that is a non sequitor.

The question is: Is Islam true? Did God/Allah reveal himself to Mohammed? The author clearly shows that the foundations of the faith were a conglomerate of Judeao-Christian ideas mixed with the cultural and religious antecedents of the area. More damning, the author shows how Islam unfolded conveniently to support the private aims of the prophet, even contradicting itself from one sura to the next, and implicating "Allah" in deceit and depravity.

If Islam is a sham, which the author convincingly reveals, then how people interpret today is irrelevant. How can any culture found its precepts on a book that is not divinely inspired? Surely the West has its problems, but hiding from them by keeping women under lock and key is barbaric. All civilisation will prosper when men and women each pursue virtue and responsible behaviour, respect each other and share their collaborative gifts with society.


Nectar in a Sieve (Signet Classics)
Nectar in a Sieve (Signet Classics)
by Kamala Markandaya
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
199 used & new from $0.01

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hope Amidst the Fragments of Life, December 29, 2006
This small but unforgettable paperback written in 1955 offers a compelling tale of Rukmani, a twelve-year-old peasant girl embarking on a marriage to a man she's never met, which was typical for India at that time. She is gratified to find in Nathan a thoughtful and generous husband and they begin their odyssey of married life--complete with hard work and losses, anxieties and simple delights, and joys and sorrows that all readers can appreciate. Piercing want is everywhere, as crops fail, city life tramples human dignity, and the inborn humility of the masses is resigned to injustice and tragedy. This doesn't keep Rukmani from giving herself in love amidst bewildering circumstances, and setting her hopes firmly against the fatalism of her culture. This story would be well-suited for teenagers as well as adults, giving a realistic view of rural India, the basics of Hindu culture, and the stark realities of dire poverty.


A Mother's Rule of Life: How to Bring Order to Your Home and Peace to Your Soul
A Mother's Rule of Life: How to Bring Order to Your Home and Peace to Your Soul
by Holly Pierlot
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.54
91 used & new from $5.02

64 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bringing God's Order Home, April 10, 2006
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Our God is a god of order. He brought order out of the soupy chaos, as chronicled in Genesis, and in order to fully embrace Him, we must do the same. This review is later than it should be because of the [fallen] response to a book outlining schedules, priorities, and order in the home. In the year 2000, Holly "pounded her fist on the kitchen table" and demanded a change in her life - resulting in this well-thought out and comprehensive book. Your reviewer was slower on the uptake, thinking a little chaos was healthy thing, until she finally hit the wall as well. The beautiful surprise is that surrendering to order is a victory for freedom.

Once the book is actually cracked and begun, the reader discovers a soul-mate in Holly - a good-hearted woman with oats to sow, with sins to confess, and an aversion to constraints. Like most mothers of orderly households, there is the breadth of humanness, from self-absorption to heroic generosity and everything in between. Most importantly, like any radical alteration, she had to really want to change.

For my children, I've defined maturity as "doing the right thing for the right reason." As I age, I've seen more and more that people often do the right thing for the wrong reasons. For example, it is entirely possible to see to your children's hygiene, your house's spotlessness, and your family's punctuality for the sake of human respect. We all succumb to considering "what others think of us" to some degree, and yet there is an inverse response - to flout convention for the sake of "not going with the crowd," or (especially with women) to be mired in a perpetual "passive-aggressive mode" with our own dear mothers.

The beauty of maturity is to face God as a grateful child and to ask Him, "What would You have me do - out of love for You and those who depend on me." As Holly's life disintegrated, she finally took it to prayer and came up with a set of priorities: God, herself, her husband, her children, and then other important things, such as work. I must confess, putting herself second on that list won me over. (It has been a sneaking suspicion of mine for decades that I am supposed to come last, and that has led me to constantly carve out for myself snippets of time and comfort, which made me feel both safe and enormously guilty.) What did she mean?

Putting herself second was practical step in acknowledging that she could not give of herself to her family and her work - both inside the home and outside - unless she were taken care of. Taking care of herself was not indulgent (shopping, pedicures, vacations, and idle gab-fests with the girls) but necessary (prayer, rest, down-time, and generally recharging the batteries). In that context, knowing that she is not to be the local doormat, a woman can face the calendar and ask what she genuinely needs. With herself taken care of, the rest comes tumbling after - without panic, oppression, or fear.

The days are just as full, the chores are just as pressing, and the children are just as needy. But there is comfort in knowing that in God's good time there is time for all. Be not afraid to consider a schedule. Mine will never be as detailed as Holly's - but at least there is one now, complete with firm bedtime and reserved reading hours. God separated the light from the dark, and on laundry days I do the same. But on the other days it just sits in the basket - and that's okay. All in due time.


Catholic Prayer Book for Mothers
Catholic Prayer Book for Mothers
by Donna-Marie Cooper O'Boyle
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $6.95
76 used & new from $0.01

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Pilgrimage of Motherhood, February 15, 2006
Our Sunday Visitor has put together a handy and attractive book for mothers, which is a multi-faceted endeavor. But Donna-Marie, as a good writer and mother of five, knows well that mothers are also daughters and fellow pilgrims with their children, leading and learning all the while. This book will fit easily into a purse or diaper bag so that it can be read anywhere - offering its spiritual morsels for the nursing mother, the waiting-room mother, the car-pool mother, and the woman who at one sitting can hardly absorb more than the assurances that Mary is her mother, too.

Containing far more than initially meets the eye, the author covers the basics of prayer, the wisdom of the Church, and the essence of virtue in this challenging vocation, calling to mind the vision of holiness and spiritual meaning when all the reader can see are dishes, demands, and diapers. Ordinary life masks the beauty of the motherly vocation, but this little book reminds the reader of its true value on every page. This would be an excellent gift for new - or not so new mothers.


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