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Helpful Votes: 21




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The Neon Bible
The Neon Bible
by John Kennedy Toole
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.45
198 used & new from $0.01

19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Black Eye for Obsessed Bible Thumpers, February 12, 2005
This review is from: The Neon Bible (Paperback)
Small town life in the South during the 1930's and 1940's leaps off the pages of John Kennedy Toole's The Neon Bible. With the Great Depression, the family suffers a financial and social fall from grace when Poppa loses his job. They are forced to move to the fringes of town where rents are cheap; they no longer go to church because they no longer have the money to tithe. Aunt Mae, who had been "on the stage," is the closest thing the church-going town's people can find to a jezebel; never mind that Jesus Christ took Mary Magdalene into his fold. When the preacher comes to take Mother, who is emotionally demented, to a place not mentioned by name but for her own good, David, the protagonist, can no longer stomach the imposed benevolence of the preacher and his oppressive, decreed moral standards that are really his lust for power, conformity to his way of thinking and doing, and censorship - that is, things NOT to his way of thinking and doing. The Neon Bible. It's John Kennedy Toole's gospel truth.


A Confederacy of Dunces
A Confederacy of Dunces
by John Kennedy Toole
Edition: Paperback
Price: $9.63
652 used & new from $0.01

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slapstick For Readers, February 12, 2005
A Confederacy of Dunces basks in the same limelight as the acting of Laurel and Hardy or The Three Stooges through John Kennedy Toole's character Ignatius Reilly. A Confederacy of Dunces truly is an American novel whose characters are over the top, who all like to hate the quasi(?) intellectual protagonist, fat and flatulent Ignatius Reilly. Self-absorbed and flat-out wrong most of the time, Ignatius pinballs his way through life comically messing up anyone and everyone (who has the misfortune to run into him) through his bungling, over-bearing thought process. A great read, a great book. Kudos to John Kennedy Toole.


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