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What Went Wrong: The Truth Behind the Clinical Trial of the Enzyme Treatment of Cancer
What Went Wrong: The Truth Behind the Clinical Trial of the Enzyme Treatment of Cancer
by Nicholas J. Gonzalez MD
Edition: Hardcover
11 used & new from $39.95

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Self-reinforcing bias and inertia in a clinical trial, August 15, 2012
This book exhaustively details the attempt by the author to persevere through a clinical trial which appears, to this lay reader, to have had the cards stacked against the enzyme treatment of cancer almost from the outset.

Time after time, the author documents every particular of problems in the trial which were pervasive from beginning methodology to the ultimate publishing of inaccurate, unreliable and unauthorized articles. At every step of the way the author's thorough documentation of concerns are either not read or read and ignored, as the self-reinforcing bias and inertia of the bureaucracies at every level and of every stripe - academic, governmental, scientific and clinical - drift ever-downward to the pre-ordained conclusion condemning an apparently viable alternative treatment in a botched trial, which could not prove anything.

I found myself skimming parts in which the same (sanitized) case histories are repeated in the context of different letters (really, books in themselves) which Dr. Gonzalez was required to send to different audiences in his attempt to salvage the trial's scientific validity. The point was not the substance of the case histories - the point was that again and again, alarms were raised and the story was told and no-one listened. This is a troubling condemnation of a system in which the major institutions of the medical field are caught with their hands in the cookie jar, reinforcing the status quo of methodologies which poison, cut and burn to "treat."
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 3, 2015 2:56 PM PDT


Folks, This Ain't Normal: A Farmer's Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World
Folks, This Ain't Normal: A Farmer's Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World
by Joel Salatin
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $22.98
57 used & new from $4.13

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Book Moves the Dialogue, October 20, 2011
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Mr. Salatin is a wonderful writer, but he's an even better thinker. I have read many books in the save-the-world, save-the-economy, save-the-ecosystem, be-a-farmer genres, and this is the best. It covers all the bases, from oppressive, size-inappropriate regulations to saving water. When I read McKibben's "Deep Economy," I found myself wishing he had more of a farmer's viewpoint since nourishing the soil, the plants, the animals, and ultimately, us'n, is all about farming the way Salatin farms. This is the McKibben-type book that we have needed - with a nourishing sense of humor, a bracing courage to call out the bad guys, and a constructive approach which everyone can use, whether it's the next dollar you spend on food or your plans for a southern window-ledge or a plot of land to do it yourself. Read this book and understand what we have to do in America to untangle ourselves from the mess we are in, because folks, it ain't normal.


The Raw Milk Revolution: Behind America's Emerging Battle over Food Rights
The Raw Milk Revolution: Behind America's Emerging Battle over Food Rights
by David E. Gumpert
Edition: Paperback
Price: $15.27
51 used & new from $2.99

50 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Compact, Slender Review, October 30, 2009
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As one of the lawyers advocating for the right to choose what to eat (isn't that a strange thing to have to say?), I appreciate Gumpert's thoroughgoing synthesis of the events of the last several years for what they were: a preview of the upcoming challenges to this fundamental right.

A pension lawyer, I have come to appreciate over the years that security in retirement is not just about monthly checks or 401(k)'s. The most important planning and investment anyone can make for happiness in later years is for good health. My own path to choosing raw milk was driven initially by health concerns. I now see the ongoing struggle in this tiny corner of America's food system as a canary in the coal mine. If we lose these battles for choice in nutrition, there is no telling where it will end.

David's book informs, in highly readable fashion, linkages and background much of which (because of my involvement), I knew. But there is much in his research and writing that I did not know until now, and his compelling telling of the story is thus a real service to the public and to all participants, both advocates, regulators, legislators, and others.

We desperately need more sensible dialogue, and it is my hope that this book will bring the pro's and con's closer together, simply by everyone being better informed. At the same time it illuminates a fundamental struggle for freedom (with responsibility) in the 21st century, for the benefit of a larger public who through this book can come to understand the complexities, as well as to appreciate the challenges of finding the "health" in "healthcare." For without improvements in health, healthcare will consume the country, and there will indeed be a harsher retirement for us all.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 7, 2011 9:56 PM PDT


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