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Linda Antonsson RSS Feed (Nödinge, Sweden)

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Neewer BG-E8 Replacement Battery Grip for Canon EOS 550D 600D 650D 700D/ Rebel T2i T3i T4i T5i SLR Cameras
Neewer BG-E8 Replacement Battery Grip for Canon EOS 550D 600D 650D 700D/ Rebel T2i T3i T4i T5i SLR Cameras
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, July 14, 2015
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Don't know how we managed to film for so long without one of these, its absolutely essential.


iPad Air 2 Case (iPad 6) - KHOMO DUAL Super Slim Black Cover with Rubberized back and Smart Feature (Built-in magnet for sleep / wake feature) For Apple iPad Air 2 Tablet
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5.0 out of 5 stars fits well and feels good in the hand, July 14, 2015
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Very well made, fits well and feels good in the hand.


A Feast for Crows
A Feast for Crows
by George R. R. Martin
Edition: Hardcover
39 used & new from $4.25

1 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Martin continues to defy expectations, August 20, 2011
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This review is from: A Feast for Crows (Hardcover)
If you're new to the series and getting to the book for the first time, perhaps having started after seeing the HBO show, take a moment to consider how the previous book ended. Momentous events, some hopeful and some intensely tragic. A lot to take in, for both readers and characters.

A Feast for Crows is a very different beast than A Storm of Swords, but this is all brought on by how A Storm of Swords ended. Several of the POVs are now dealing with the aftermath of what happened in the previous three books and the costs of all that action is now given time to sink in.

I was actually quite disappointed when, following A Storm of Swords, we were told that the action would jump ahead five years between books 3 and 4. I felt it would not give readers the time to mourn the deaths and reflect on the events in the previous books since it would be "old history" for the characters when we next met them.

Given this, I was very pleased to see that the jump ahead was abandoned and that we instead were allowed to follow along as the characters dealt with the events of the prior books. I also feel that GRRM's writing is at its most beautiful and poignant in many of the chapters in A Feast for Crows.

Of course, some POVs don't appear at all in this book, and I do think that announcement should probably have been at the front of the book instead of at the end; it is frustrating to wait for a chapter that never shows up and not all readers have the benefit of Internet discussions to inform them in advance. So, do yourself a favour and don't turn page after page waiting for Dany, Jon and Tyrion. You'll see them in the next book.

There are several new POVs, some fairly brief, but don't look at them as taking up room that your missing favourite could have had. Look at them as more opportunities of seeing new facets of the story. Its all a giant mosaic and all the pieces matter for the final image. That said, I think one really doesn't have to enjoy all POVs to enjoy the overall story; I definitely have my favourites as well as those that I rarely reread.

This is, without a doubt, an even more character-driven book than the previous, but this change of tone and pace is something the series has been building towards, with chapters growing longer and more detailed over the previous books. Some readers are clearly disappointed with the change, but others (myself included) have embraced it. But I don't think it is surprising that a series that hooked readers by being different and defying expectations might lose some of them along the way by continuing to be different and continuing to defy expectations.

That has nothing to do with a lack of quality, its all down to personal opinion. In my personal opinion, this was a wonderful read which clearly showed that GRRM is not just a master of shocking plot twists but also a master of characterisation.
Comment Comments (11) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 29, 2011 5:14 AM PDT


A Dance with Dragons (A Song of Ice and Fire)
A Dance with Dragons (A Song of Ice and Fire)
by George R. R. Martin
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.83
461 used & new from $1.35

21 of 257 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It doesn't get much better, July 12, 2011
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A long wait has a way of raising expectations to levels that often cannot be met.

This, however, is not the case with "A Dance with Dragons". It delivers the characters it promised to deliver (and more; I loved every one of the new POVs as well as the chapters reconnecting with characters from "A Feast for Crows") and it delivers the rich atmosphere, shocking plot twists and fascinating background details that make "A Song of Ice and Fire" a stand-out series. Martin is a master storyteller who isn't bound by genre or by conventions; some chapters are high fantasy, others are almost pure horror, and it all blends so very well.

Admittedly, I was not one of those who was disappointed in the previous book, "A Feast for Crows". In fact, I rank it my second favourite, after "A Game of Thrones" but alongside "A Storm of Swords". Where would I place "A Dance with Dragons"? Narrowly below AFfC and ASoS and a fair bit ahead of "A Clash of Kings". In terms of stars, I would place all but ACoK at 5, with it somewhere around 4 or 4 1/2 if that existed.

Those who didn't care for "A Feast for Crows" may find the first half of ADwD to be somewhat similar in tone and pacing and they may also find themselves less enamoured than I was with the new POVs. However, the build-up of the first half comes to several very strong (I hesitate to use the word "satisfying" because the emotions elicited by what happens aren't quite right for that) conclusions in the latter half.
Comment Comments (155) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 4, 2014 10:53 PM PST


Pegasus
Pegasus
by Robin McKinley
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $16.25
163 used & new from $0.01

1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars McKinley continues to enchant, January 22, 2011
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This review is from: Pegasus (Hardcover)
Pegasus is another of those ageless books that Robin McKinley is so good at. I would have loved this book when I was a child or a teenager and I most certainly loved it as an adult. Of course, I remain a horse-girl at heart, so it is hard to go wrong with a princess and a pegasus.

It starts off a bit slow and it takes a while for the pieces to start coming together to give you a sense of where this journey is taking you. I enjoyed this part, though I can see why some readers would find it a little too slow. However, the development of the relationship between Sylviianel and Ebon was more than enough to hold my interest while the larger-scale plot slowly started emerging from little hints here and there. Something isn't entirely right within the Alliance and this sense of something slightly off reminded me very much of the Hero and the Crown, as did some of the dreamlike sequences of Sylviianels experiences among the pegasi.

McKinly is a master at constructing problems -- especially magical problems -- that are far from clear-cut. She is also a beautiful world-builder and this is very evident in Pegasus.
Comment Comments (16) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 20, 2011 10:33 AM PDT


Godslayer: Volume II of The Sundering
Godslayer: Volume II of The Sundering
by Jacqueline Carey
Edition: Hardcover
60 used & new from $0.01

12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Inevitable End, October 30, 2005
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After reading the first half, Banewreaker, long after it was released, I had promised myself not to wait on reading the second half. After all, they were originally meant to be published as one, and the end of Banewreaker was such that one really didn't want to wait on the conclusion for too long. Quite a feat for the author to have accomplished, I must say, given that you know from the get-go where the story is heading: the `bad' guys, the ones you in fact end up rooting for, are fated to lose.

Perhaps it is just human nature, helped along by the way Carey writes the story, but even despite knowing that it is a tragedy, you constantly keep hoping that something will happen to change the inevitable. You just can't imagine she'll really go ahead and do what she's said she will do, even when the evidence mounts higher and higher. But ... she does. And if you're anything like me, you'll read the last hundred pages with a growing lump in your throat and a tightness in your chest. Not too many weeks ago, we studied tragedies in my Literature class, and Godslayer definitely fulfills many of the requirements of a classic tragedy, not the least being able to produce katharsis in its readers.


Kushiel's Chosen (Kushiel's Legacy)
Kushiel's Chosen (Kushiel's Legacy)
by Jacqueline Carey
Edition: Hardcover
66 used & new from $0.77

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A well-crafted sequel., April 13, 2002
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I was fortunate when I came across _Kushiel's Dart_ in October last year; it turned out to be a truly great read, and I didn't even have to wait all that long for its sequel. Now, however, half of my luck is out. I found _Kushiel's Chosen_ to be just as good as the previous book, but this time around I'll have to wait a full year for the next and (or so I believe) final book, _Kushiel's Avatar_.
Like the first book of the series, _Kushiel Chosen_ is a well-written book that is a pleasure to read (and yes, I suppose I do mean in more than one way -- the erotic scenes are very well written, tasteful and yet not tame), combining the intrigues of the first half of _Kushiel's Dart_ with the action of its latter half. The language is beautiful and flows well, the characters are engaging, the plots are interesting and the world is well-crafted and fascinating.
There really isn't anything I don't like about this book, but as with _Kushiel's Dart_, it is not a book for those who dislike adult content, a first-person narrative or characters of unusual beauty and brilliance.


Daughter of Lir (Epona)
Daughter of Lir (Epona)
by Judith Tarr
Edition: Hardcover
39 used & new from $0.23

17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating tale of a turbulent time, July 16, 2001
The fourth entry into the Epona Sequence, a cycle of books set in the ancient past and focusing on the first cultures to ride and tame horses, may well be the best of them. Set generations after the first novel _White Mare's Daughter_, _Daughter of Lir_ sets the stage with a deftly written prologue filled with signs, portents, and the undercurrent of theological politics. From the story leaps forward to begin to show the many differences -- and interesting similarities -- between the People of the steppes and the cities of the Mother. The main protagonist is a woman, but not far behind are several male characters, who together represent the two opposed cultures.
This well-written book keeps a good pace, and Tarr's academic credentials make her depiction of the cultures seem vividly real; even the use of magic (even more clearly an actual working force than in the previous books) seems to fit the novel. Tarr is especially skilled in depicting, with but a few words, deep and complex relationships between individuals without making it seem like vapid romance. Last of all, her style is an impeccably clean prose, not simplistic but simply very clear and unaffected by a desire to seem 'literary'. All in all, the novel was a joy to read.


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