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William Meikle "Willie" RSS Feed (Newfoundland, Canada)

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Aliens (Special Edition)
Aliens (Special Edition)
DVD ~ Sigourney Weaver
Offered by Brand New Rarities
Price: $15.97
115 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars He can't make that decision, he's only a grunt, September 19, 2003
This review is from: Aliens (Special Edition) (DVD)
Before the overblown Titanic and True Lies, James Cameron was a genre film-maker with few peers. The taut tension of his first Terminator movie made him a natural to have a stab at one of SF's great monsters. And this time, as the title suggests, there are more than one of them.
As in the first movie of the series, it all starts quietly. Ripley wakes in an orbiting hospital facility to find she has been rescued from her "lifeboat", having spent fifty-seven years in hypersleep.
The Company blame her for the loss of the Nostromo, and she is stripped of her officer's license. Humiliated, and bothered by nightmares, she is reduced to running "loaders" (futuristic fork lifts which cover your body like a mechanical suit) in the space docks.
That is until Burke, a company man, arrives at her door to tell her they have lost contact with a terra-forming colony on the planet she first encountered the alien. Ripley is persuaded to join a mission to the planet, alongside Burke and a troop of bad-ass marines.
There are some great SF interiors in the ship, and the marines have suitably bashed and battered weaponry, while still looking sufficiently futuristic, but the film drags along for a bit at this stage, with too much exposition and not enough action. But that all changes when they reach the planet.
They find a deserted colony, the rooms and walkways showing signs of a violent struggle. The only survivor is a young girl, "Newt", who becomes Ripley's surrogate child. (Incidentally, the special edition of the DVD has an early scene reinstated that explains why Ripley forms such a strong attachment to Newt, and is well worth watching for an insight into Ripley's state of mind.)
When the colonists PDTs (Personal Data Transmitters) are all found to be broadcasting from an area under one of the cooling towers, the stage is set for a series of mind-blowing action sequences.
At their first encounter the Marines get overrun by the Aliens ("In case you haven't been paying attention, we just got our a**es kicked."), then their escape craft crashes, leaving them stranded on a site that is in danger of exploding. They retreat to a sealed compound to consider their options. (Again, the Director's cut has added scenes here, where heavily armed robot sentries keep the Aliens at bay at the compound perimeter.)
From here on in its a roller-coaster of climaxes till the end - Ripley and Newt are trapped in a locked room with two face-huggers (released by company man Burke to try to get an alien embryo back to Earth); the Aliens break into the compound for a climactic battle; Burke gets what's coming to him; Newt is taken by the Aliens; Ripley fights to get her back and, finally, we get to find out where the Alien eggs come from.
Ripley's stand off with the Alien Queen is one of the great images in modern SF and you'll be gripping your seat with tension long before the ending.
Sigourney Weaver carries this movie, dusting off her action heroine credentials once more, and is ably assisted by Michael Beihn and Lance Henrickson. But as in all monster movies. it's the monster that's the important thing, and the special effects people can take great credit from this movie - the Aliens are among the best screen creatures ever created and the Queen is a work of art, like some warped dinosaur skeleton painted in high gloss black and brought to life to stalk our nightmares.
Whereas Ridley Scott made a great SF movie in "Alien", Cameron has made a great action movie. The last hour of this film contains enough tension, emotion and excitement to leave you rung out by the end.
I recommend you watch it on a big screen with the volume turned up to eleven and let it take you away for a while. Just don't leave before the credits - there might be another climax yet to come.


Star Wars - Episode IV, A New Hope (Special Edition) [VHS]
Star Wars - Episode IV, A New Hope (Special Edition) [VHS]
VHS
Offered by toywise
Price: $18.42
84 used & new from $0.97

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic story telling, April 25, 2003
Watching this again recently I was struck by the traditional nature of the story telling. The film may be hi-tech, but the narrative is rooted long in the past. In particular, I noted several parallels between Star Wars and the plot of current blockbuster, Lord of the Rings.
Consider the similarities;
- Both Luke and Frodo have to leave their hearth and home to fight a menace they know little about
- Both are accompanied by companions who are steadfast and true, and just quirky enough to provide light relief after moments of high tension. In Luke's case he has the droids with their whistles and strange sounding voices, while Frodo has the slightly rustic Sam and the younger, enthusiastic Hobbits.
- Both come under the wing of old, swami-like tutors with strong mystical powers, a cantankerous nature and who are prone to say things like "It is your destiny" and "The darkness is seductive". And both mentors disappear out of the story just as our hero needs them the most.
- Both Luke and Frodo enter a bar filled with a strange amalgam of creatures from different places where people talk in strange tongues and where they meet a strong enigmatic man whose destiny is linked with theirs - Luke meets Han, Frodo meets Strider
- Both have something in their past that returns to provide a focal point in the story. With Frodo it is the ring left to him by Bilbo, with Luke it is his relationship with Vader, and the light sabre that Obi-Wan gives him.
-At the pivotal point in both stories, the hero stands alone with his fear, facing his greatest trial, before finally prevailing.
- And overriding the whole thing in both stories is the battle betwen the forces of light and darkness.
There are many more parallels but I don't want to give away too much plot on the off-chance that there's someone on the planet who hasn't seen it yet, But if you look you'll find other aspects of traditional storytelling lurking in the film, including some that have parallels, not in LOTR, but in traditional folk tales. Rescuing princesses, finding out about your true parentage and learning from wizened creatures in dank forests have all been standard fare for heroes for thousands of years.
I think that's the genius of it, and what made it such a must-see movie. It speaks to us in strong archetypes, with characters and situations we recognise from fairy tales from our childhood. Tolkein knew the power of the old stories, and drew heavily on them, and so too does George Lucas.
I just wonder if he read LOTR at an impressionable age?


Horror of Dracula [VHS]
Horror of Dracula [VHS]
VHS
Offered by Texploited
Price: $13.14
32 used & new from $0.01

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bloody good fun, April 25, 2003
This review is from: Horror of Dracula [VHS] (VHS Tape)
I first saw this in about 1970, on BBC2, on an old black and white TV which was about 10 inches square and made everybody look like short fat cubes. But even that didn't detract from the power of this film.
This Hammer horror version sticks fairly closely to Stoker's original novel, and as such is a purist's dream.
By now almost everybody knows the plot - Jonathan Harker goes to Transylvannia to cement a property deal for a landed gent looking to move to England, but ends up being held hostage in Dracula's high castle with some very buxom "ladies" of the night.
Meanwhile a boat comes ashore in a storm at Whitby, strangely devoid of life. And soon after that the women of the area begin to suffer a strange lassitude and a thinning of the blood. And over in the asylum, Renfield is eating flies and dreaming of the coming of his "Master"
Enter Van Helsing. In this version Peter Cushing plays the archetypal vampire hunter with a grace and elegance that Sir Anthony Hopkins singularly failed to match in Coppola's version. He knows the signs of vampirism and, when Dracula makes an appearance the stage is set for one of the great confrontations in horror movie history.
The chase leads an intrepid and determined band all the way back to the Count's castle, where the final climax around the gothic hall is surely one that every true horror fan will always cherish.
Lee plays the Count as no one before or since. His flat demonic stare sems to ooze pure evil. The count has become a cultural icon in the past forty years, and has even been parodied and made fun of (Count Duckula anybody?) but I challenge anybody to look Lee in the eye when he's on the hunt and not feel a frisson of cold terror.
Vampires have been humanised recently (and have even got a soul in Angel's case), but it shouldn't be forgotten that they are [bloodsuckers] - that's what they are, that's what they do. The high cheekbones, sex-appeal and good clothes sense are just nice-to-have after thoughts. And in Lee's case you can believe that the bloodsucking is the important part, judging by the relish he shows for the deed.
And just because Buffy can stake a dozen or so without breaking sweat, it shouldn't be forgotten that the vampire is traditionally a great evil force of destruction. Lee never lets you forget it.
Hammer's specialty was in a feel for the gothic, and they have been influential on many directors since (in particular, Tim Burton's "Sleepy Hollow" and the recent Johnny Depp vehicle "From Hell") This was an early stab at the horror movie, and they got it so right that they spent a long time trying to repeat the trick. Over the next fifteen years they made some notable horror movies, and the blood got ever redder (and the bosoms got bigger)
But none of their later films matched this.....the one, the only, Count Dracula.


The Stand
The Stand
by Stephen King
Edition: Hardcover
80 used & new from $13.25

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disasterously good, April 25, 2003
This review is from: The Stand (Hardcover)
If he never wrote another word, Stephen King deserves to be remembered for this, his contribution to the "Disaster Novel" genre. (NOTE: This review applies to the ORIGINAL release of the novel, not the "Special Edition")
It begins innocuously enough, with an army officer running away from his base. But he has left it too late, and he carries a new disease into the world. Over the next months people begin to die, in small numbers at first, then in their hundreds, thousands and finally millions.
The survivors, a disparate band drawn from all walks of life, find they have to make a choice; to join with the forces of evil, personified in Flagg (one of the best fictional villains in living memory) or to take a "Stand" for good, personified by Aunt Abigail, an old wizened black woman with a fundamentalist approach to her faith.
Soon all the survivors are lined up on one side or the other, and the final battle for their future destiny is set up when the main characters must take their own "Stand"
The questions of faith posed by this, and how each of the protagonists make their choices, form the moral core of this book, and the rigours of basic survival when civilisation has fallen forms the backbone of the plot, but it is the characters who stick in your mind long after you've finished reading.
King has always been good at "country" types, but here he shows a sure hand with such disparate people as a deaf-mute, a rock star, a garage worker, a pregnant teenager and her admirer-from-afar neighbour Harold (a gentleman so slimy you'll feel like taking a shower after just reading about him)
You feel rapport with these characters, and are soon cheering them on, and King has managed to reel in his propensity for "bloat", and doesn't let any one character take over.
The book carries a strong moral tone thoughout, and at times seems almost biblical in its "fire-and-brimstone" intensity. In typical King fashion there are some terrifying set pieces, the pick of which takes place in a tunnel which is full of dead and decomposing bodies that must be navigated without a light. Not for the squeamish.
A lot of people have been daunted by the sheer size of this book. At over 1000 pages, it is not a quick read, and in the early chapters it is sometimes difficult to keep track of its large list of characters. Also, King seems to take delight in slowing things down and looking in great detail at some pretty unpleasant deaths as a result of the disease - a super-flu which results in particularly messy fluid expulsion.
However once Flagg appears and starts insinuating himself into the survivors' dreams. the tension starts to crank up and King knows how to keep you hooked, cheering the good guys along to the denoument.
I won't spoil it by giving away the ending, but the final "Stand" doesn't come quite as expected, and has some truly shocking consequences for the protagonists.
For a jaded horror fan brought up on John Wyndham and John Christopher, this book revitalised my interest back in the late 70's. This was the book that brought me back to horror, and made me want to write it myself.
For that alone it's got a lot to answer for.


The Beatles 1
The Beatles 1
Price: $15.93
221 used & new from $0.29

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The soundtrack of my childhood, April 21, 2003
This review is from: The Beatles 1 (Audio CD)
My first memory of the Beatles is when I was five and "She Loves You" blared from the six foot cube of mahoganised monstrosity my dad called a "radiogram". It was quite a shock to a kid brought up on "Puff the Magic Dragon" and "The Little Drummer Boy"
Listening to this album is like charting my childhood. Although I was too young in '67 to appreciate the finer naunces of hippydom (if there were any), I knew even then that the fab four were more than just a pop band, and I can vividly remember seeing them perform for the last time on the London rooftops.
Who knows what they might have gone on to do if they hadn't split up. But then again, maybe it is best that they did, and left us with this perfect collection of pop gems.
This is how a boy band should be. These guys didn't need to be manufactured, they didn't need anybody to tell them how to perform, and they didn't need anyone else to write their songs for them. From Lennon's snarl, McCartney's way with a melody, Harrisons' fluid guitar and Ringo's solid driving force, the combination formed a band that worked so well together that they might never be bettered.
My musical tastes may have changed since then, but if you were born before 1965, these songs will bring a warm wash of nostalgia that'll make you forget the subsequent fates of the band members....for a while at least.


The Beatles 1
The Beatles 1
Price: $15.93
221 used & new from $0.29

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The soundtrack of my childhood, April 21, 2003
This review is from: The Beatles 1 (Audio CD)
My first memory of the Beatles is when I was five and "She Loves You" blared from the six foot cube of mahoganised monstrosity my dad called a "radiogram". It was quite a shock to a kid brought up on "Puff the Magic Dragon" and "The Little Drummer Boy"
Listening to this album is like charting my childhood. Although I was too young in '67 to appreciate the finer naunces of hippydom (if there were any), I knew even then that the fab four were more than just a pop band, and I can vividly remember seeing them perform for the last time on the London rooftops.
Who knows what they might have gone on to do if they hadn't split up. But then again, maybe it is best that they did, and left us with this perfect collection of pop gems.
This is how a boy band should be. These guys didn't need to be manufactured, they didn't need anybody to tell them how to perform, and they didn't need anyone else to write their songs for them. From Lennon's snarl, McCartney's way with a melody, Harrisons' fluid guitar and Ringo's solid driving force, the combination formed a band that worked so well together that they might never be bettered.
My musical tastes may have changed since then, but if you were born before 1965, these songs will bring a warm wash of nostalgia that'll make you forget the subsequent fates of the band members....for a while at least.


Vittorio the Vampire: New Tales of the Vampires
Vittorio the Vampire: New Tales of the Vampires
by Anne Rice
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $17.87
564 used & new from $0.01

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Please...no more!, April 21, 2003
That it I'm afraid. I'm finished with Anne Rice after following her since the first - there's only so much angst you can take before depression sets in.
Anne Rice novels, the first Lestat books in particular, carried you along in wonderment at a new view of the world, but that wonder has grown stale and stagnant, and lanquid posing while waiting for the next sexual frisson does not, for me anyway, make for interesting reading.
Wondering about your place in the world is all very well, but most of us grow out of it in our teens. Maybe that's why these Vampires do little more than gaze at their own navels - they are emotionally stunted.
Too much new-gothic lounging and not enough plot.


The Lord of the Rings (3 Books)
The Lord of the Rings (3 Books)
by Brian Sibley
Edition: Paperback
41 used & new from $5.24

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Changed my life, April 21, 2003
This book changed my life. Before it I was a spotty 14 year old hooked on my science studies. Then I read LOTR, and, at the same time, discovered women existed and.....but thats enough of that. You want to hear about the book.
By now there are few people who haven't at least heard of LOTR, and most of them have an opinion. There are the fans, almost fanatics, and there are the people who have read fifty pages or so, sometimes five or six times, but just can't get it, and don't understand what the fuss is about. I might have been one of them, if it hadn't been for an accident.
I asked my local librarian to recommend a book for me as I had read all the Arthur C Clarke and Isaac Asimov works they had. She pointed me at LOTR, and handed me what she said was book 1 of 3. It was only when I got home I found I had book 2: The Two Towers.
I arrived in the story just at the point where the first film ends - The Fellowship is broken and Frodo and Sam are heading for Mordor.
I think that is what made me keep reading -I had started at a point of crisis and I needed to know what happened next. Of course I had a lot of blanks to fill in, but I managed to pick up most of them as I went along , and I caught up with the first book as soon as I'd finished the third. (I bought the big all-in-one paperback, the one with the yellow cover. If you were a student in the seventies it was obligatory to have one lying about, all battered and torn to show that it had been read several times. You used to see backpackers in their hundreds on the trains going south through Europe, all with this version of LOTR falling apart in their hands.)
As for starting at the begining, I believe the reason a lot of people give up is that they are expecting heroes, wizards and high magic. What they get is, in great detail, the rural goings-on of a bunch of small hairy creatures who eat and drink a lot and seem to live in an idealised version of the Home Counties. Anyone who has read "The Hobbit" will know that there is more to the Hobbits than that, but newcomers often feel cheated and give up.
They don't know what they're missing.
The story only picks up AFTER Bilbo's birthday party, and after the passing of his ring of invisibility to Frodo. Gandalf, a wizard, discovers the true nature of the ring. It is a magic item of great power, belonging to Sauron himself, a dark god intent on taking dominion over the world.
Gandalf tells Frodo that the ring must be taken to a place of safety, to Rivendell, where the high-elves hold out against Sauron.
And so the great journey starts, with Frodo and his friends, Sam, Merry and Pippin, taking the road to Rivendell. On the way they have many adventures, and the mood begins to darken with the appearance of the dark riders, servants of Sauron intent on finding the ring.
The travelling band is befriended by Strider, a ranger of the north, and he helps them get to Rivendell, but not before Frodo is wounded by the dark riders, and starts to understand the power of the ring.
At Rivendell, many things are revealed; the history of the ring is told, Strider is shown to be Aragon, the rightful heir to the kingdom of Middle-Earth, and a fellowship is forged, of wizards, elves, dwarves, men and hobbits. They form a band of nine who will try to take the ring to Mount Doom, a volcano where the ring was forged, and which is the only place where it can be destroyed.
And so the adventure truly begins. From here on we have battles in deep mountain mines, the loss of one of the Fellowship, encounters with elves in enchanted forests, treachery and betrayal leading to the breaking of the fellowship - and we're still in Book 1!
Books 2 and 3 deal with the fight for middle-Earth, with Aragon and his allies taking the battle to Sauron and his minions and Frodo and Sam trying to reach Mount Doom to destroy the ring. There are huge, stirring, battle scenes, moments of humour (especially when the younger hobbits meet the Ents), spectacular feats of high magic when the White Rider enters the battle scenes, and moments of great friendship and tenderness - I defy anyone to have a dry eye when Sam and Frodo are parted at Shelob's lair.
It all builds up to a terrific climax, and the story comes full circle back at Hobbitton where we see the effect the war has had on the rural life of the Hobbits.
And that is why the beginning is important - you might not see it till right at the end, but it is teaching us a lesson about the value of the simpler things in life - respect them or lose them.
Tolkein's genius lies in melding these simple aspects with world-shattering events, showing how even the "little people" have their part to play in the fight against the darkness.
And he also knows that the best villain is a mysterious one....Sauron hardly appears at all in the books, but his dark presence stretches over everything, and he's always there, his evil eye seeing everything.
I used to have nightmares about that large, red-rimmed eye, but that was before I discovered women, grew my hair, developed a liking for Hawkwind and Led Zeppelin, and started to write fantasy fiction. I've never been the same since...... but that's another long story.


Alien
Alien
DVD ~ Sigourney Weaver
Price: $9.96
90 used & new from $0.35

5.0 out of 5 stars Scared the pants off me, April 21, 2003
This review is from: Alien (DVD)
There's a violent vicious alien on board our large empty spaceship. Let's all go into dark rooms alone to look for it. Oh dear, it's got me.
There's more to it than that of course, including an intriguing subplot about the venality and greed of "The Company" who want to study the Alien, and many long lingering shots of the, admittedly stunning, set design. But it's the set up of the scares that's the important thing about this movie.
As a monster movie it has few peers.
It all starts very quietly. The crew of the Nostromo, a deep space cargo vessel, are woken from hypersleep by their computer.
"Mother" wants them to investigate a distress signal on a previously uncharted planet, and Ian Holm's science officer is strangely keen on the idea.
We find out why when the investigating shore party find the remains of a huge alien spaceship. The pilot, a giant alien, is long dead, its skeleton strangely buckled as if exploded from within. John Hurt goes down into the bowels of the alien craft, and in one of the great SF scenes of all time, finds a nest of alien eggs. He foolishly gets too close to one, and it hatches, releasing a face-hugging alien that wraps itself tightly around Hurt's head, refusing to let go.
When they get Hurt back to the Nostromo, Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) is reluctant to break quarantine to let them on board, but Ian Holm's science officer overrides her, and Hurt is taken to the medical bay.
Sometime later, the facehugger seems to fall off Hurt's head and he wakes up, seemingly recovered. The crew decide on one last meal before returning to hypersleep.
So as not to spoil one of SF cinemas great shocks, I'll just say that it's about now that the alien makes it appearance, a sharp toothed monster with concentrated acid for blood and a very mean disposition.
And the real shocks start to pile up as one by one the crew are picked off by the alien, until Ripley is left to fight the menace alone.
This film changed the look of SF movies for ever. Ridley Scott was a graphic artist, and his attention to detail and eye for a great visual shows in the set design and cinematography. The corridors of the Nostromo are like a series of dark caves, and the strobe-lit chase scenes have the quality of your worst nightmares.
The film was groundbreaking in other ways as well - Sigourney Weaver became one of the first females to carry a major blockbusting movie, (and has gone on in the sequels to an even stronger screen presence)
It also created one of the great SF monsters. Giger's creation went on to become a worldwide phenomenon in comics, models, tie-in novels and posters, almost as well known as those other icons King-Kong and Godzilla.
The recent DVD issue also contains a deleted scene that afficionados have been waiting for - Ripley encounters the first case of alien cocooning when she discovers what the monster has been doing with the crew members it has been taking. It's a pity this scene was deleted, as it explains parts of the second film, and also provides motivation for Ripley's hate of the monster more than just emphasising her fear of it.
To today's audience the first half of the film may seem far too leisurely - there are no establishing shocks in the first reel, and little action until they get into the alien ship. But Scott handles the rising tension brilliantly, and once the alien makes an appearance, it's a white knuckle ride with few equals.
Just don't have lunch before watching it for the first time.


The Matrix
The Matrix
DVD ~ Keanu Reeves
Offered by SOUTHWEST MEDIA
Price: $9.99
1126 used & new from $0.01

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Restored my faith in SF Movies, April 21, 2003
This review is from: The Matrix (DVD)
SF Movies have suffered from a lack of style in recent years. There's only so many times you can see Bladerunner or Alien ripped off cheaply before you start to get jaded. And it doesn't help that they keep casting muscular dolts with the intellect of a plank in violent revenge fantasies that do little more than ape the "Death Wish" movies.
So it's three cheers for The Matrix, the film that restored my faith in SF movies.
It starts with a bang, a chase across rooftops with some spectacular leaps that make you realise that wherever you are, it's not the world you live in.
Or is it?
Neo (or is that Neophyte?) is a programmer by day in a faceless corporation, and a hacker by night, searching for Morpheus, a shadowy figure who may hold the key to Neo's longings for a different world. Morpheus on the other hand is looking for a Saviour, someone who will come and lead the oppressed masses to a new Utopia.
Soon their paths cross, and Neo is shown the real world, a world that is not all he thought it to be. In this world everything is run by "The Matrix", a super computer that controls everything and everybody, body and soul. (Or, as the Oracle so succinctly puts it, "Balls to Bones")
Neo is removed from the system's influence, and is told he is "The One", the long-prophesised saviour who can remake the Matrix to his own will. He is trained in how to fight the Matrix defense programs (or "Agents".....software that takes the guise of super-powerful humans and can take control of anybody still hooked up to the Matrix)
To accomplish this he is given a crash course in martial arts in a manner that would be great if it were possible today (I can imagine the ads - "Learn Kung-Fu in thirty seconds....no philosophising necessary!") . Once he reintroduces himself to the Matrix's world the stage is set for some climactic fight scenes, among the best ever seen in cinema history.
To say more would be to give away too much of the plot, but suffice to say The Matrix is one of the biggest, most explosive, most stylish SF films ever.
It succeeds where lesser films fail by melding a hi-tech glossy look with martial arts battles familar to Hong-Kong film lovers, and overlaying the whole thing with a mythic plot of the Saviour who is slowly coming to realise his destiny.
Even the names hold a mythic quality to them, from Morpheus, the god of sleep who knows who is dreaming and who is awake, to Cipher who is not all he seems, to Trinity, the embodiment of child, mother and lover and finally Neo, the classic neophyte trying to find a path through the mysteries. The ancient Greeks would have had no trouble in following the basics of this story.
Reeves has never been better, portraying confusion and frailty one minute, strength and resolve the next. But it is Fishburne's movie....it is his presence that holds the whole thing together and keeps you rivetted to your seat.
All that and a shadowing of a peril coming to Zion, the last stronghold of the true believers, and we're all set up for a blockbuster of a sequel. I can't wait.
Couple that with an outstanding directors talk-over, and an ingenious "follow the white rabbit" extras feature that lets you cut in and view how any particular effect or stunt was achieved, and you have a DVD that's hard to ignore for quality, quantity and entertainment.
All that, loads of black leather gear, big boots and guns. What more do you want?
And any film that contains a clip of the cult classic "Night of the Lepus" is always going to be worth a look.


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