Profile for Gregory A. Van Mechelen > Reviews

Browse

Gregory A. Van M...'s Profile

Customer Reviews: 2
Top Reviewer Ranking: 17,710,763
Helpful Votes: 6




Community Features
Review Discussion Boards
Top Reviewers

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Gregory A. Van Mechelen RSS Feed
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Energy Free: Homes for a Small Planet
Energy Free: Homes for a Small Planet
by M.Arch., Ann V. Edminster
Edition: Paperback
Price: $20.49
28 used & new from $12.43

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great resource for the experienced and those wanting to be green, September 20, 2011
"Energy Free" offers a well-written, concise, and complete overview of the ideas and elements that will make our homes work with the natural environment rather than against it. For the professional, it is a starting point with the concepts that give direction for further work, and a refresher of what can and needs to be done to do no less than save our planet. For the homeowner, it provides vital concepts and information you need to work with a professional, or even to design your own home.

As an architect practicing residential solar design for almost twenty years, I can think of no better book to give my clients, and I still return to it for inspiration and reminders.

Greg VanMechelen, VanMechelen Architects


Ecological Design and Building Schools: Green Guide to Educational Opportunities in the United States and Canada
Ecological Design and Building Schools: Green Guide to Educational Opportunities in the United States and Canada
by Sandra Leibowitz Earley
Edition: Paperback
39 used & new from $0.01

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long overdue, an important resource for the future, February 2, 2006
The rise of environmental design or "green" architecture is by far the most important movement in architecture and the building industry for the last two decades. And for years young people have faced the daunting task of finding the best education to meet their needs. My architectural office is constantly receiving questions from students asking where they should study. At last we have a clear and effective guide to the broad range of opportunities to learn about sustainable design.

The guide takes on the very broad and sometimes confusing diversity of ecological design fields, from "natural building" schools to institutions that offer study in more technological solutions. This book covers an incredible range of schools, including traditional 4 year college as well as part-time schools, post-professional education, and organizations that provide hands-on instruction.

The book is very well organized, and I found the ratings charts of the schools to be especially clear and useful. I only wish there were more of the concise 1 page profiles that paint a very clear portrait of what the schools are like. While students still have to do more personal research as to which school will ultimately suit them best, they now have an excellent base to get them started.


Page: 1