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Stoney RSS Feed (Miami, FL)
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Fiskars Extendable Handle Lopper with Single Pivot (9166)
Fiskars Extendable Handle Lopper with Single Pivot (9166)
Price: $19.62
8 used & new from $19.01

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 31, 2015
FRISKARS EXTENDABLE 9166
> This is a simple (non-compound) bypass lopper. Therefore (see the discussion below for explanations) it has a comparatively long reach (even without the extendable arms) and cuts cleanly particularly through soft wood.
> There are two advantages of the long arms: greater reach and more power. The Fiskars Extended lack the power (leverage) of comparable compound or geared loppers, but are lighter and have more reach.
> The Friskars Extendable 9166 is ideal for situations in which you'd normally use bypass pruning shears, but need a longer reach, such as trimming large rose bushes.

EVALUATION
> Because of the light-duty construction and bypass design, this is NOT a good lopper for thick hardwood branches--it will likely jam, flex, and then bend or break in thick branches.
> Because of the long arms, this is a good looper for small branches (say up to 3/8") when you need a long reach.
> If necessary and with care not to flex the jaws, you can cut hardwood branches up to about 1/2" or softwood branches up to 3/4".
> Used as I recommend (above) these loppers should be much less fatiguing than heavier-duty loppers

TYPES OF LOPPERS
> BYPASS vs ANVIL
>> Bypass lopper have two blades, like a pair of scissors, which move past one another. They cut cleanly, but have a tendency to jam in hard or dry wood, particularly in thick branches. They can also flex apart and bend or break (mostly when you twist them, trying to unjam them). If they have flexed or bent, then small branches will just jam between the blades rather than be cut.
>> Anvil loppers have one blade, usually straight, which cuts to a flat "anvil", like a knife on a cutting board. If not sharp, they have a tendency to crush rather than cut cleanly, but are less likely to jam., bend or break. Anvil loppers sometimes do not cut completely through soft fibrous material, particularly if the blades are dull. Comparing similar anvil and bypass loppers, the anvil loppers cut thick branches easier..
>> Bypass loppers work well closed "slow and easy", like scissors. Anvil loppers work best snapped close (like using a cleaver on a cutting board).
>> Bypass loppers have a sharp blade on the top and right, and a "dull" blade on the bottom and left. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades clockwise (relative to cutting a branch perpendicularly) to cut through the branch at an angle, bypass loppers are likely to jam. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades counterclockwise, the blades are likely flex apart and be bent or broken. So, with bypass loppers, it is best to cut thick branches perpendicular to the branch. The angle doesn't matter much when using anvil loppers.
> SIMPLE vs COMPOUND or GEARED
>> Compound loppers have built-in levers to give you more leverage, to cut thicker branches easier. Geared loppers do the same thing, but with one less lever. Most loppers over 18" long, or used to cut hard wood, over about 1/2" thick should be compound or geared. Short loppers (e.g., 12" ) are usually simple. .
>> A disadvantage of compound or geared loppers is that you have to spread the arms very wide to open up the jaws for a thick branch. But your arms have less power spread so far apart, and obstructions (such as other branches or walls) are likely to get in the way. If you can't back up (for example, if you are on a ladder), loppers that you have to spread very wide can "punch" yourself in the chest when you close them.
> RATCHETED LOPPERS
>> Ratcheted loppers give you more leverage (like compound or geared loppers, but more so) because of the ratchet mechanism, so you can squeeze, spread the handles again (without opening the jaws, and squeeze again closing the jaws some more. So, you can open the jaws wide without having to open the arms. The disadvantage of ratcheted loppers is that they are more time consuming) to use---it takes more time to "pump": the arms 4 times to close them, than just once. . So although fine for thin or soft-wood branches (especially in tight spaces), racheted loppers are best for thick hardwood branches, or individuals with limited arm strength, for example, because of arthritis. Since ratcheted loppers are usually built for heavy-duty use, they are usually much heavier than comparable light-duty loppers.
> STRAIGHT vs CURVED ANVIL LOPPERS
>> There are probably excellent reasons for curved jaws. However it is very hard to sharpen the curved blade of curve-jawed anvil loppers, and have them perfectly align with the anvil, which is important. However, it is easy to sharpen the blade of straight-jaw loppers (I use my belt sander), and to adjust the anvil to perfectly align with the sharpened blade. So, I only consider straight-jawed anvil loppers.

GENERALIZATIONS
> If you want the cleanest cuts possible, particularly in soft woods, use a bypass lopper, such as these.
> If you want more leverage (at the cost of less reach) use a compound or geared lopper.
> If you want to cut the thickest branches possible, use an anvil lopper, ideally a racheted anvil lopper
> If you want the maximum possible reach and leverage for thicker branches use a racheted lopper.

RECOMMENDATION
> Spray your loppers with WD-40 before and after using them. Before will make cutting, especially of thick branches, much easier. After will prevent them from rusting.


Corona FL 3420 Compound Action Anvil Lopper with Fiberglass Handles, 1-1/2" Cut, 31" Length
Corona FL 3420 Compound Action Anvil Lopper with Fiberglass Handles, 1-1/2" Cut, 31" Length
Price: $29.99
29 used & new from $25.91

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 30, 2015
CORONA FL3420 LOPPER
> Because of the anvil design and the relatively robust construction, this is an excellent lopper for moderately thick hardwood branches.
> Of course, if the blade gets dull (which is inevitable for anvil loppers) cutting gets harder. Also an anvil lopper with a dull blade often does not cut completely through fibrous material.
> Fortunately, it is easy to sharpen the blade (I use a belt sander). If you sharpen the blade, you also have to adjust the anvil, which is easy.
> Since they are compound and non-racheted, it is easy to punch yourself in the chest using them, especially when trying to cut thick branches.
> If you want to trim delicate plants (which may have moderately thick, difficult-to-reach, branches, such as roses) a bypass lopper might be a better choice.

TYPES OF LOPPERS
> BYPASS vs ANVIL
>> Bypass lopper have two blades, like a pair of scissors, which move past one another. They cut cleanly, but have a tendency to jam in hard or dry wood, particularly in thick branches. They can also flex apart and bend or break (mostly when you twist them, trying to unjam them). If they have flexed or bent, then small branches will just jam between the blades rather than be cut.
>> Anvil loppers have one blade, usually straight, which cuts to a flat "anvil", like a knife on a cutting board. If not sharp, they have a tendency to crush rather than cut cleanly, but are less likely to jam., bend or break. Anvil loppers sometimes do not cut completely through soft fibrous material, particularly if the blades are dull. Comparing similar anvil and bypass loppers, the anvil loppers cut thick branches easier..
>> Bypass loppers work well closed "slow and easy", like scissors. Anvil loppers work best snapped close (like using a cleaver on a cutting board).
>> Bypass loppers have a sharp blade on the top and right, and a "dull" blade on the bottom and left. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades clockwise (relative to cutting a branch perpendicularly) to cut through the branch at an angle, bypass loppers are likely to jam. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades counterclockwise, the blades are likely flex apart and be bent or broken. So, with bypass loppers, it is best to cut thick branches perpendicular to the branch. The angle doesn't matter much when using anvil loppers.
> SIMPLE vs COMPOUND or GEARED
>> Compound loppers have built-in levers to give you more leverage, to cut thicker branches easier. Geared loppers do the same thing, but with one less lever. Most loppers over 18" long, or used to cut hard wood, over about 1/2" thick should be compound or geared. Short loppers (e.g., 12" ) are usually simple. .
>> A disadvantage of compound or geared loppers is that you have to spread the arms very wide to open up the jaws for a thick branch. But your arms have less power spread so far apart, and obstructions (such as other branches or walls) are likely to get in the way. If you can't back up (for example, if you are on a ladder), loppers that you have to spread very wide can "punch" yourself in the chest when you close them.
> RATCHETED LOPPERS
>> Ratcheted loppers give you more leverage (like compound or geared loppers, but more so) because of the ratchet mechanism, so you can squeeze, spread the handles again (without opening the jaws, and squeeze again closing the jaws some more. So, you can open the jaws wide without having to open the arms. The disadvantage of ratcheted loppers is that they are more time consuming) to use---it takes more time to "pump": the arms 4 times to close them, than just once. . So although fine for thin or soft-wood branches (especially in tight spaces), racheted loppers are best for thick hardwood branches, or individuals with limited arm strength, for example, because of arthritis. Since ratcheted loppers are usually built for heavy-duty use, they are usually much heavier than comparable light-duty loppers.
> STRAIGHT vs CURVED ANVIL LOPPERS
>> There are probably excellent reasons for curved jaws. However it is very hard to sharpen the curved blade of curve-jawed anvil loppers, and have them perfectly align with the anvil, which is important. However, it is easy to sharpen the blade of straight-jaw loppers (I use my belt sander), and to adjust the anvil to perfectly align with the sharpened blade. So, I only consider straight-jawed anvil loppers.

GENERALIZATIONS
> If you want the cleanest cuts possible, particularly in soft woods, use a bypass lopper.
> If you want to cut the thickest branches possible, particularly hardwood branches, use an anvil lopper, such as these. A ratcheted anvil lopper would be best for the thickest, hardest, branches, particularly in tight spaces..

RECOMMENDATION
> Spray your loppers with WD-40 before and after using them. Before will make cutting, especially of thick branches, much easier. After will prevent them from rusting.


Fiskars 25 Inch Extendable Power-Lever Lopper (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
Fiskars 25 Inch Extendable Power-Lever Lopper (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
Offered by Shoplet
Price: $29.45
46 used & new from $21.32

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 30, 2015
FRISKARS 25" EXTENDABLE LOPPERS
>> This is a compound bypass lopper. Therefore (see the discussion below for explanations) it cuts cleanly particularly through soft wood.
>> There are two advantages of the long arms: greater reach and more power. However both are compromised. Since the loppers are compound, you have to open the arms wide to open the jaws wide for even a moderately thick branch--but the wider you open the arms, the less reach you have. Similarly, you have to open the arms very wide for thick branches, but your arms have less power so far apart..

EVALUATION
> Because of the bypass design and the relatively light construction, this is NOT a good lopper for thick hardwood branches--it will likely jam, flex, and then bend or break.
> Because of the long arms, this is a good looper for moderately thick branches (say up to 1/2") when you need a long reach.
> If necessary and with care not to flex the jaws, you can cut hardwood branches up to about 3/4" or softwood branches up to 1 1/4".
> I had trouble with jamming in 1/2" hardwood limbs---but fortunately I noticed the flexing before I did any permanent damage to the loppers. I plan to reserve these loppers for small branches or softwoods in the future and use my Corona anvil loppers for hardwood branches.

TYPES OF LOPPERS
> BYPASS vs ANVIL
>> Bypass lopper have two blades, like a pair of scissors, which move past one another. They cut cleanly, but have a tendency to jam in hard or dry wood, particularly in thick branches. They can also flex apart and bend or break (mostly when you twist them, trying to unjam them). If they have flexed or bent, then small branches will just jam between the blades rather than be cut.
>> Anvil loppers have one blade, usually straight, which cuts to a flat "anvil", like a knife on a cutting board. If not sharp, they have a tendency to crush rather than cut cleanly, but are less likely to jam., bend or break. Anvil loppers sometimes do not cut completely through soft fibrous material, particularly if the blades are dull. Comparing similar anvil and bypass loppers, the anvil loppers cut thick branches easier..
>> Bypass loppers work well closed "slow and easy", like scissors. Anvil loppers work best snapped close (like using a cleaver on a cutting board).
>> Bypass loppers have a sharp blade on the top and right, and a "dull" blade on the bottom and left. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades clockwise (relative to cutting a branch perpendicularly) to cut through the branch at an angle, bypass loppers are likely to jam. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades counterclockwise, the blades are likely flex apart and be bent or broken. So, with bypass loppers, it is best to cut thick branches perpendicular to the branch. The angle doesn't matter much when using anvil loppers.
> SIMPLE vs COMPOUND or GEARED
>> Compound loppers have built-in levers to give you more leverage, to cut thicker branches easier. Geared loppers do the same thing, but with one less lever. Most loppers over 18" long, or used to cut hard wood, over about 1/2" thick should be compound or geared. Short loppers (e.g., 12" ) are usually simple. .
>> A disadvantage of compound or geared loppers is that you have to spread the arms very wide to open up the jaws for a thick branch. But your arms have less power spread so far apart, and obstructions (such as other branches or walls) are likely to get in the way. If you can't back up (for example, if you are on a ladder), loppers that you have to spread very wide can "punch" yourself in the chest when you close them.
> RATCHETED LOPPERS
>> Ratcheted loppers give you more leverage (like compound or geared loppers, but more so) because of the ratchet mechanism, so you can squeeze, spread the handles again (without opening the jaws, and squeeze again closing the jaws some more. So, you can open the jaws wide without having to open the arms. The disadvantage of ratcheted loppers is that they are more time consuming) to use---it takes more time to "pump": the arms 4 times to close them, than just once. . So although fine for thin or soft-wood branches (especially in tight spaces), racheted loppers are best for thick hardwood branches, or individuals with limited arm strength, for example, because of arthritis. Since ratcheted loppers are usually built for heavy-duty use, they are usually much heavier than comparable light-duty loppers.
> STRAIGHT vs CURVED ANVIL LOPPERS
>> There are probably excellent reasons for curved jaws. However it is very hard to sharpen the curved blade of curve-jawed anvil loppers, and have them perfectly align with the anvil, which is important. However, it is easy to sharpen the blade of straight-jaw loppers (I use my belt sander), and to adjust the anvil to perfectly align with the sharpened blade. So, I only consider straight-jawed anvil loppers.

GENERALIZATIONS
> If you want the cleanest cuts possible, particularly in soft woods, use a bypass lopper, such as these.
> If you want to cut the thickest branches possible, use an anvil lopper, ideally a racheted anvil lopper
> If you want the maximum possible reach, use a racheted lopper.

RECOMMENDATION
> Spray your loppers with WD-40 before and after using them. Before will make cutting, especially of thick branches, much easier. After will prevent them from rusting.


Heavy Duty Muslin Clamps 4 1/2 inch 6 Pack
Heavy Duty Muslin Clamps 4 1/2 inch 6 Pack
Offered by Power Saver Store
Price: $8.49
10 used & new from $8.20

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 29, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> 4 1/2" long X 3 1/2" high X 5/8" thick
> Jaws open to 1 3/4" (maybe 2" if you strain), but are probably best used to clamp a maximum thickness of about 1"
> Jaw pads 5/8" x 7/8"
> Closer than the pads the inside of the jaw can grip round poles 7/8" to ~1 1/4" in diameter
> The pads pivot, so they are parallel to each other when gripping, which (while providing a strong gap) spreads out the pressure and does not damage surfaces.
> The pads have a grove down the center, perpendicular to the clamps which might be useful for gripping 1/8" to 1/4" poles.

EVALUATION
> The clamps I received are well made, and none are broken.
> I suspect that the reviewers who reported that they broke spread them too far---with the jaws open more than about an inch the tension is very strong. If you use them to clamp things less than about 1", I doubt that they would break.
> I'll report on my experience in the future.


Miracle-Gro Liquafeed Universal Feeder Starter Kit 16oz
Miracle-Gro Liquafeed Universal Feeder Starter Kit 16oz
Price: $15.94
16 used & new from $9.95

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 28, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> The feeder screws into your faucet and your hose screws into the feeder.
> The feeder has a variable switch-lever-valve between full on (delivering fertilizer) and full off (water only), It will empty a liquid fertilizer bottle in 10-15 minutes. For intense feeding, I use the "full on" position. For routine feeding (once a week), I use it at half-way position. For more frequent feeding (every day or two), I'd use it at 1/4-on.
> The angle is adjustable, so you can use it on almost any faucet, regardless of the angle--even faucets with mouths perpendicular to the ground. For best results, the feeder should be adjusted so that the bottle is perfectly vertical.
> The feeder works with timers or even splitters. For my purposes, I find it best to install the feeder before the splitter or timer.

PROS
> Apparently the feeder actually pumps the liquid fertilizer, so the concentration should be more uniform than using granular Miracle-Gro and feeder.
> Both the granular and liquid Miracle-Gro feeders can clog up if you don't use-up the fertilizer, rinse, and dry the feeders after every use. The "faucet feeder" should not clog up, since it is connected all the time. It is probably best to have the fertilizer at least a little "on" anytime you are watering plants to keep the passages open.
> You can use any nozzle or even lawn sprinklers you want at the end of your hose. I use one feeder with a timer and a portable lawn-bird sprinkler. For nozzles, I particularly recommend a Gilmour Select-A-Spray Comfort Grip Nozzle 594 Black/Teal

CONS
> The plastic of the connections is soft. It is easy to cross-thread when installing the feeder on your faucet, or when installing your hose on the feeder, in which case you'll ruin the threads and the connections will leak. Be very careful that the connections are aligned before screwing them in. Silicon grease helps make it easier.
> If you have a long hose, there will be a lot of fertilizer solution in the hose when you finish watering. So, you need to flush the hose (or better, use a different faucet) if you need to use the hose for some other purpose (such as washing your car). To flush your hose, just turn the feeder to the "water only" position, and water your plants. The package contains a table for how long it takes to flush hoses of various lengths.

COMPLAINTS OF OTHER REVIEWERS
> A lot of reviewers have voiced alot of complaints. But many of the complaints are speculation from folks who got advanced free samples during the winter, and had not actually used the feeders when they wrote their reviews. They disserve negative votes for wasting our time.
> I had NO PROBLEM with the "swivel" (of the 3 feeders that I own) which adjusts the angle of the bottle. Indeed, I found it so stiff (a good thing) that a full bottle needs to be installed for the leverage to rotate the "swivel".
> I had NO PROBLEM with the water pressure.
> The idea of using Teflon tape on the connections is good. But silicon grease is probably better. I normally use silicon grease on all hose connections Permatex PERMATEX DIELECTRIC GREASE 22058. However, I installed all of my 3 feeders "dry" (without tape or grease), and all work fine with NO leaks.
> I have had NO PROBLEMS with leaks. I suspect that most users with leaks cross-threaded the connections (much too easy to do), or did not tighten the connections properly. I used a pair of channel pliers to tighten the connections, e.g., Stanley 84-024 10-Inch Bi-Material Groove Joint Pliers.
> MANY reviews complain about the cost of the liquid fertilizer bottles---mostly "Vine" reviewers who got their feeders for free!!!, and are not familiar with Miracle-Gro products. In fact, the liquid fertilizer bottles are exactly the same bottles which are used with Miracle-Gro hose-end feeders. It is true that granular Miracle-Gro fertilizer is much cheaper and the Miracle-Gro liquid fertilizer. And in turn granular Miracle-Gro is much more expensive that bargain-brand 40-sacks of dry fertilizer. When you use Miracle-Gro you pay for quality and convenience. This is by far the most convenient feeder system Miracle-Gro has ever sold. Unfortunately the granular Miracle-Gro may not dissolve sufficiently completely to be used in the liquid-feed system. I wish that Miracle-Gro offered a "mix it yourself" dry fertilizer for the liquid feeders.
> Some reviews complain that you can't move the feeder from hose to hose. True, but including the value of the 2 bottles of fertilizer in the kit, the feeders are only $6--$8 each; less on sale. You can afford a feeder for each of your faucets. I have feeders on each of my 3 faucets.
> Yes, a back-flow-preventer is a good idea, but that applies just as well to hose-end feeders, or even "on the general principle of the thing" on any faucet, anytime. It is NOT a special consideration for this feeder.
> One reviewer complained that she could not use it because she had a 5-hose manifold on her faucet. Just install the feeder before the manifold, and it will work just fine.
> One reviewer complained that he could not use it because his faucets open straight out, not at a 45 degree angle. The body of the feeder rotates to accommodate any angle.

FOLIAR FEEDING
> Part of the whole point of Miracle Grow is foliar feeding---that plants will absorb nutrients through their leaves faster than via their roots---but the leaves can only absorb a little at a time. So foliar feeding needs to be light and frequent. Light frequent foliar feeding (even daily) is most effective in which it rains frequently during the growing season, washing nutrients out of the upper soil layer. Orchids are best feed sprayed daily with a weak foliar solution.

FEEDING SCHEDULE
> A good soaking will provide your plants with all the nutrients they need for a 2-week growth spurt. Beware though that the solubility of Miracle Grow is a mixed-blesssing, if you feed your garden in the morning, an afternoon shower can wash all the Miracle Grow away before your plants have a chance to absorb most of the nutrients. So, I suggest using Miracle Grow at least once-a-week in the spring when your plants are growing rapidly.
> Later in the summer, when growth slows and rain is frequent, reduce the feeding schedule to one every two to four weeks.
> Toward the Fall, a maintenance feeding once a month may be advisable. Most professional gardeners discourage Fall feeding, on the theory that dormancy should be encouraged to avoid frost damage.
> Depending on your situation, your feeding schedule might be different. Here in tropical South Florida, the dry season sets-in in the Fall and the plants come out of their Summer torpor, so that's when I step-up my feeding schedule.


Nasal Soft CPAP Cushion - Blue
Nasal Soft CPAP Cushion - Blue
Offered by Patient Sleep Supplies
Price: $15.95
3 used & new from $14.95

5.0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER OPTION, May 24, 2015
IN SHORT
> Seating your mask properly may allow you to loosen the straps, which may relieve the pressure on your nose and cheekbones causing your pain and/or sores. You may not need a nose cushion.
> It's weird, right? In your doctor's office, or at the medical equipment supplier, the mask seats easily with a perfect seal---but in your bed you struggle for hours with leaks. Here's why:

PROPERLY SEATING A CPAP MASK SO THAT IT DOES NOT LEAK
> You have to take advantage of the air pressure of your CPAP machine to properly seat the mask on your face. So turn off the air pressure ramping (or set the ramp time to zero).
> Oddly (it seems to me) skin oil does NOT help keep the mask seal. A clean face and a clean mask hold the best seal. So, wash your face and the mask. It makes a big difference.
> Turn the machine on (or with an automatic machine, hold the mask to your face and take a few breaths), then (with the air blowing) strap the mask into place just a little low on your nose--it will slide up into place.
> If the mask slides into your eyes (or starts leaking), don't pull it down. Instead reseat it by pulling the mask away from your face and downward a little, and then lowering it into place. Sliding up your nose a little doesn't disrupt the seal, but pulling it down (out of your eyes) does cause leaks.
> Once you've learned to seat the mask properly, you may need to adjust the straps on your headgear. I find that with seating the mask properly, I can wear the upper strap looser, which relieved the pressure on my nose and cheekbones.
> Try it. IT REALLY WORKS!!!

DEALING WITH MIDDLE-OF-THE-NIGHT LEAKS
> If you have an automatic CPAP machine, it can interpret a minor leak (caused when your move at night) as an apnea event, and increase the air pressure, which causes a greater leak, which the machine interprets as a worse apnea event, and therefore increase the air pressure, which makes the leak worse, etc., etc., etc.
> The situation is "unrecoverable"--the machine will not reset by itself. No even if you hold the mask tightly against your face to stop the leaks.
> The only solution is to reset the machine. You may have to leave the machine off for 10 seconds or so for it to reset. But if you hit the on/of button, it may automatically restart without resetting. The best thing to do is to disconnect (or take off) the mask. A good time for a bathroom break.

MY EXPERIENCE
> I had a difficult time with leaks with my "medium" F&P Simplus full face mask, including leaks. So my sleep doctor changed me to a "large", which felt more comfortable in his office, but at home the nose leak blowing into my eyes was worse and drove me crazy.
> I tried everything I could think of, including KY Jelly and "tacky fingers", even taping the mask to my face with blue painter's tape.
> Then at 5am on a sleepless night (because of the leaky CPAP mask), I put this nasal cushion in my shopping cart, but I continued surfing the web and found a website which explained how to stop leaks. AND IT WORKED!!! So, I don't need the pad.


4.0-Gallon Reverse Osmosis RO Water Storage Tank by PA-E
4.0-Gallon Reverse Osmosis RO Water Storage Tank by PA-E
Offered by Express Water
Price: $32.99
14 used & new from $31.87

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 20, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> The black stand in the photo is mostly for shipping, but you can use it if you want--or not.
> 13 1/2" overall tall X 11" in diameter
> No installation instructions

INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR TYPICAL RO SYSTEM
> Turn off water to RO system
> Open RO faucet, wait for water to drain
> Even with the water off, you may still get a lot of backflow, particularly if you have a line to an icemaker. So be prepared with a bucket and towels.
> Replace the tank. It's best to use Teflon plumbing tape on the threads. Plumber's Goop also works, maybe even better, but you should wait at least a few hours for it to harden before turning the water back on. Eclectic Products Inc 3.7Oz Plumbing Goop 150011 Thread Tape & Paste
> Close the faucet and turn the water back on to the RO system.
> With a hand pump, such as a bicycle pump, pressurize the tank to 5-7 pounds using the "tire" valve on the side. Caution, most pressure gauges do not accurately read that low, you may need to purchase one.
> It may be a good idea to flush the first 2 tanks before using the water.


Watts Premier 560014 Membrane 110009 24 GPD Membrane Replaced by 560014, 1-Pack
Watts Premier 560014 Membrane 110009 24 GPD Membrane Replaced by 560014, 1-Pack
Offered by Complete Filtration Services Inc.
Price: Click here to see our price
15 used & new from $27.00

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 20, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> Color: yellow
> 24 gallons per day, which you should check to see if it matches your existing system. My understanding is that if you install a higher capacity membrane, you may have to add a flow limiter to your system.
> Genuine Watts #11009---which is important because Watts membranes have a built-in check valve. If you use a non-watts membrane, you may have to add a check-value to your system.
> Measurements: 11 1/2" long overall; body 1 3/4" diameter; to fit in a 2" diameter tube
> Comes with instructions

SUGGESTIONS
> Consider replacing all the other filters at the same time---you'll get more life out of the membrane.
> Consider replacing your tank at the same time---the rubber diaphragm in the tank has a limited life (probably 5--10 years).
> Silicon grease is perfect for lubricating the O-rings for the best seal. However, you don't want silicon grease to leach into your drinking water. So if you use silicon grease on the O-rings, be sure to wipe off all excess---just a few molecules thick will do the job. Permatex PERMATEX DIELECTRIC GREASE 22058


XCSOURCE 5x 1/4" 3/8" Tripod Mount Screw Convert Adapter Flash Light Stand Spigot LF600
XCSOURCE 5x 1/4" 3/8" Tripod Mount Screw Convert Adapter Flash Light Stand Spigot LF600
Offered by xcsource
Price: $9.99
2 used & new from $9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 16, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> The 1/4"-female---3/8"-female adapters (the largest adapters) are 5/8" in diameter by 1 1/8" long
> The 1/4"-male---1/4"-male adapters are 5/8" in diameter by 3/4" long
> The 1/4"-female---3/8"-male adapters (the smallest pieces) are 3/8" diameter by 5/16" long

COMMENTS
> The 1/4"-female---3/8"-female (the largest adapters) are a little small for some uses. For example, it is really too small in diameter for adapting a 3/8" tripod to a 1/4" ballhead (with a 1/4"-male---1/4"-male). That would work but it would be a weak link.
> The 1/4"-female---3/8"-male adapters (the smallest pieces) are fine for converting 3/8" threaded hole to 1/4" threaded hole, but they have to be seated with a screwdriver. They have a shoulder, and so need a countersunk hole.
> The 1/4"-female---3/8"-male adapters are not so good for converting a 1/4" post to a 3/8" post. First, they are short---you only have 3 threads. Second they have a shoulder, and so may not screw all the way into a 3/8" hole. In most applications they would have to be glued in place if you want them to stay on a 1/4" stud. Widely available brass versions may be better for this purpose.
> The 1/4"-male---1/4"-male adapter are fine---but the studs a little long for some purposes---you might have to add a washer to fill the additional space, such as screwing into the tripod socket of a camera.


Opteka CBW-5 Extra Chrome Counterbalance Weights for SteadyVid EX Video Stabilizer (1/4" Threads)
Opteka CBW-5 Extra Chrome Counterbalance Weights for SteadyVid EX Video Stabilizer (1/4" Threads)
Offered by 47th Street Photo
Price: $14.95

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 16, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> Two identical weights
> Each 3/4" high by 1 1/2" in diameter
> 6oz each
> 1/4" x 20 tpi X 1/4" long stud on one end (probably removable with a hex wrench)
> 1/4" x 20 tpi threaded hole on the other end

Look good, does the job.


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