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Stoney RSS Feed (Miami, FL)
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Neewer® Pro(Pro Version of Neewer® Product) 4 Way Macro Focusing Focus Rail Slider /Close-up Shooting for Canon Nikon Pentax Olympus Sony Samsung and Other Digital SLR Camera and DC with Standard 1/4" Screw Hole (Pro Version of Rail Slider)
Neewer® Pro(Pro Version of Neewer® Product) 4 Way Macro Focusing Focus Rail Slider /Close-up Shooting for Canon Nikon Pentax Olympus Sony Samsung and Other Digital SLR Camera and DC with Standard 1/4" Screw Hole (Pro Version of Rail Slider)
Offered by New Harbor
Price: $23.50
2 used & new from $22.50

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 1, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> 6" X 6" X 3 1/2"
> Movement range (in either axis) 4"
> Large knobs drive the carriages; the small knobs optionally lock the carriages in place.
> Very well made. Much better made thanNeewer® Two-way 4"/10cm Macro Shot Focusing Focus Rail Slider for Flash Canon Nikon Sony DSLR Camera 1/4" Screw Quick Release Mount
> Note that I also own a Novoflex focusing rail---so I know what to expect.

PROS
> Carriage moves smoothly, allowing reasonably precise adjustment
> On a new focusing rail, the movement is stiff enough that you don't need to lock it.
> Stage does not interfere with the LED focusing screen on my Lumix GX7 (the simple 1-axis Neewer focusing rail does)
> Even with the rail in its full forward position, it not interfere the electronic veiwfinder on my Lumix GX7 (the simple 1-axis Neewer focusing rail does)
> Stage does not interfere with large diameter lenses (the simple 1-axis Neewer focusing rail does).
.
CONS
> Adds 3 1/2" to the height of any setup, which can be a problem with macro field photography.

COMPLAINTS OF OTHER REVIEWERS
> The complaints are about movements of less than 1mm (as specified by one reviewer). That is insignificant for "normal" macrophotography, and would be unnoticeable taking photos less than about 4X.
> > Locked down (with the locking knobs) my focusing rail had no "play" or looseness.
> > More than enough precision for me, taking macro-photos at up to 4x magnification (i.e., filling the frame with subjects 1/4" high).
> The tripod threads were fine on my focusing rail--albeit a little oddly placed at the edges of the plate. I would have liked a centered tripod threaded hole.
> One reviewer suggested "soaking" the focusing rail in WD40. While WD40 is a "miracle" product with a thousand uses, it is NOT a good idea in this case. WD40 is too "aggressive". It dissolves glue and any pre-existing oil or grease, and WD40 eventually evaporates (and the fumes may damage photo equipment in the same drawer, bag, or case). A better solution is silicon grease Permatex PERMATEX DIELECTRIC GREASE 22058. It takes some effort to work the silicon grease into the components, and wipe off excess, but it won't damage anything.
> Many of the complaints are similar to my experience with the cheaper 1-axis Neewer focusing rail. Over the years, I've found that many reviewers review different items than they actually purchased. For this item, I'd only trust "verified purchase" reviews.


Covercraft UVS100 Heat Shield Custom Fit Windshield Sunshade for Select Volkswagen Passat Models  - Laminate Material (Blue Metallic)
Covercraft UVS100 Heat Shield Custom Fit Windshield Sunshade for Select Volkswagen Passat Models - Laminate Material (Blue Metallic)
Price: $49.43
6 used & new from $36.10

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 1, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
> Fits my 2003 Passat perfectly, as does one I purchased for my 2010 Golf.
> Durable. Replaces one I purchased for my 1988 Accord, and had been using since then.
> The reflective side does a good job of reflecting heat, and keeping the car significantly cooler.
> Also does a good job of blocking UV which bleaches out the color of car interiors and makes the plastic components brittle.
> Folds and stows easily


North American Mushrooms: A Field Guide To Edible And Inedible Fungi (Falconguide)
North American Mushrooms: A Field Guide To Edible And Inedible Fungi (Falconguide)
by Orson K. Miller
Edition: Paperback
Price: $19.17
67 used & new from $13.93

3.0 out of 5 stars DISAPPOINTED, June 29, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
MY EXPERIENCE
> I was unsuccessful in identifying about a dozen species of South Florida mushrooms using NORTH AMERICAN MUSHROOMS by itself. About half of the species are in NAM, but look very different. The other half are not in NAM. I found the names of the mushrooms using Google images, and then confirmed the ranges and other info using NAM.
> I do not collect wild mushrooms to eat, and based on this experience would never rely on NAM to identify edible/inedible mushrooms.
> This is NOT a guide to edible mushrooms, because such a guide would require discussions of poisonous "look-alikes". Many of the "edible" species in NAM have poisonous "look alikes" which are NOT in NAM.

PROS
> Great rugged binding---can survive field use.
> Great sharp clear photos, beautifully reproduced.
> Excellent supporting text (description, habitat and range, and useful comments)

CONS
> One photo per species (albeit usually of several specimens), which is inadequate to show the range of color, range of growth forms, or even variations as some mushrooms mature.
> Very poor index. Species are not indexed by genera (i.e., you can find applanatum, Ganoderma but not Ganoderma applanatum). Genera are indexed only for general and key pages---so, if you've got a good idea of the genus, you cannot easily find the species which belong to that genus.
> The more you use NAM, the easier it gets and the more valuable it becomes, but it is a steep learning curve.
> Has reasonably good text and illustrated keys to groups. Most unfortunately these are not integrated with the glossaries nor with the main descriptive text of the book. There are no page references from the keys to the corresponding species entries. In these days when digital manuscripts can be formatted with automatic page number cross references, there is no excuse for the lack of page references.
> NAM has a text glossary and an illustrated glossary. Both are highly technical and are difficult to use, and are not cross referenced. For example, you can read that lamellae are "the hymenium of flat plates" but there is no page reference to illustration(s) depicting lamellae


Capstone 2 in 1 LED Night Light Power Failure Light
Capstone 2 in 1 LED Night Light Power Failure Light
Offered by PlatinumBuys
Price: $30.99
4 used & new from $24.95

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, June 17, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
IN SHORT
Think of it as a night light with a limited emergency lighting function.

DESCRIPTION
> 3 ½" X 5" X ½" (with a bulge 3/4" thick from the wall)
> The Capstone Light will work if you just plug it into a wall socket, but in that case the plugs extend 3/8" into the wall socket and will not hold well. You need to remove the wall plate and install the Capstone light with the supplied screws for the best installation.
> Therefore it fits only 2-socket outlets (i.e., not 4 or 6 plug outlets---but those are rare in most homes).
> You could install it in and outlet with 1 socket and 1 light switch. However such setups are usually installed with the switch on top. If the switch is on top, you have to install the Capstone light upside down---which works just fine, and does not look odd.
> The Capstone Light switch has 4 positions: Off; emergency light off; lo nightlight; hi nightlight. I don't know what the difference is between the "off" and "emergency light off" positions are. Both nightlight settings are also emergency light "on" (in case of a power failure).
> As supplied, works with "old fashion" outlets with semi-round sockets. You have to remove an insert and two small plugs fr0om the Capstone Light to use with "modern" square outlets, including those with Ground Fault Protection. The instructions are not clear on how to remove the insert.

PROS
> Easy installation.
> Hi/Lo nightlight function.
> Automatically turns on if there is a power failure.
> Uses LED bulbs, so little power used.
> Low profile, mostly extending only ½" from the wall, so does not get in the way, and is unlikely to be bumped.
> Semi-permanent installation means that it a bump will not cause it to fall off the wall.
> One short, two long screws provided for each light.

CONS
> Claims only "up to" 3 hours emergency light. Probably much less, particularly as the rechargeable batteries loose capacity over time. But you can turn the emergency light off to conserve the charge.
> There is little difference between Hi and Lo.
> Uses 1 outlet socket.
> Blocks the other outlet socket for battery chargers etc.
> Since you have to install it with screws, you cannot use it as a portable emergency light.
> Doesn't match "white" wall sockets which have a slight warm cast, since the Capstone light is bluish gray. It looks white by itself, but not so much when next to anything that is truly white.


Premium Grade Soft Silicone - D -Shape Screw-in Silicon Nose Pads (Available Sizes 13mm,15mm,17mm,19mm) (D-SHAPE CLICK-ON 19MM, 2)
Premium Grade Soft Silicone - D -Shape Screw-in Silicon Nose Pads (Available Sizes 13mm,15mm,17mm,19mm) (D-SHAPE CLICK-ON 19MM, 2)
Offered by GroupMedShop
Price: $4.98
2 used & new from $4.98

1.0 out of 5 stars DOES NOT DO THE JOB, June 16, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
> I ordered a package of 2 pairs of D-shaped nose pads (which would be 2 left and 2 right pads). I received 4 left pads and no right pads.
> The left pads fit well and look fine---but I need a right pad as well.


Boomerang Gel Pad (AGGELPAD-Med/Lge)
Boomerang Gel Pad (AGGELPAD-Med/Lge)
Offered by Northeast Deals Inc
Price: $9.99
8 used & new from $9.85

5.0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER OPTION, June 11, 2015
IN SHORT
> Seating your mask properly may allow you to loosen the straps, which may relieve the pressure on your nose and cheekbones which has been causing your pain and/or sores. You may not need a nose cushion.
> It's weird, right? In your doctor's office, or at the medical equipment supplier, the mask seats easily with a perfect seal---but in your bed you struggle for hours with leaks. It's because your mask was fitted by your doctor by the equipment salesperson with full pressure from the CPAP machine. Your doctor or the salesperson may have adjusted the straps too tight to stop the last trace of a leak.

PROPERLY SEATING A CPAP MASK SO THAT IT DOES NOT LEAK
> First, heal those sores, even if you have to skip CPAP treatment for a night. But ask your doctor first---in case you are one of those rare individuals for whom death or stoke is a significant risk. Antibiotic cream will speed up the healing. A nose pad may protect your nose for a few days while it heals, but is not a long term solution.
> To properly seat your CPAP mask on your face you have to take advantage of the air pressure of your CPAP machine. So turn OFF the air pressure ramping (or set the ramp time to ZERO). The sudden increase in pressure may feel strange at first, but you get used to it very quickly. The normal response to the pressure is to hyperventilate, which will keep you awake. You need to concentrate on breathing slowly and relatively shallowly.
> Oddly (it seems to me) skin oil does NOT help the mask seal. Skin oil allows the mask to creep up your face and then leak into your eyes. A clean face and a clean mask will hold the mask in place and hold the best seal. So, wash your face and the mask. It makes a big difference.
> > If you have an F&P Simplus or similar mask, it is best to wash your mask in the morning, or at least early in the evening, because the slightest trace of moisture in the ball-joint of the hose connection can cause a very annoying squeal--like a mosquito.
> > It is best to wash your face shortly before bedtime. Avoid "moisturizing" creams, etc. Lanolin (recommended on some misguided CPAP websites) and some other facial creams are even worse than facial oil.
> Turn the machine on (or with an automatic machine, hold the mask to your face and take a few breaths), then (with the air blowing) strap the mask into place just a little low on your nose--it will slide up into place.
> If the mask slides into your eyes (or starts leaking), don't pull it down. Instead reseat it by pulling the mask away from your face and downward a little, and then lowering it into place. Sliding up your nose a little doesn't disrupt the seal, but pulling it down (out of your eyes) does cause leaks.
> Once you've learned to seat the mask properly, you may need to adjust the straps on your headgear. I find that with seating the mask properly, I can wear the upper strap much looser, which relieved the pressure on my nose and cheekbones.
> Oddly, even after I learned to seat my mask properly (3 weeks ago), the seal got better night-after-night. For the past two weeks, my machine has reported (on the internet website) a PERFECT seal every not. Not just a "good" seal. The machine considers 8 gallons/minute of leakage to be a "good" seal. It has reported a ZERO leak rate for me for the past two weeks. (Actually it's wrong, I still get 2-3 small "middle of the night" leaks, see below).
> Try it. IT REALLY WORKS!!!

DEALING WITH MIDDLE-OF-THE-NIGHT LEAKS
> If you have an automatic CPAP machine, it can interpret a minor leak (caused when your move at night, or your mask slides up) as an apnea event, and increase the air pressure, which causes a greater leak, which the machine interprets as a worse apnea event, and therefore increases the air pressure, which makes the leak worse, etc., etc., etc.
> The situation is "unrecoverable"--the machine will not reset by itself---not even if you hold the mask tightly against your face to stop the leaks.
> The only solution is to reset the machine by either hitting the on/off button or taking the mask off, or both. You may have to leave the machine off for a few seconds or so for it to reset.

MY EXPERIENCE
> I had a difficult time with leaks with my "medium" F&P Simplus full face mask, including leaks. So, about a month ago, my sleep doctor changed me to a "large", which felt more comfortable in his office, but at home the nose leak blowing into my eyes was worse and drove me crazy.
> I tried everything I could think of, including KY Jelly and "tacky fingers", even taping the mask to my face with blue painter's tape.
> Then at 5:00am on a sleepless night (because of the leaky CPAP mask), I put this nasal cushion in my shopping cart, but I continued surfing the web and found a website which explained how to stop leaks. AND IT WORKED!!! So, I don't need the pad.


Fiskars Extendable Handle Lopper with Single Pivot (9166)
Fiskars Extendable Handle Lopper with Single Pivot (9166)
Price: $19.62
5 used & new from $19.01

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 31, 2015
EVALUATION
> The Fiskars 9166 is is a simple (non-compound) bypass lopper. Therefore (see the discussion below for explanations) it has a comparatively long reach (even without the extendable arms) and cuts cleanly particularly through soft wood.
> Although the extended arms give you more leverage, the Fiskars 9166 lacks the power (leverage) of comparable compound or geared loppers.
> The Fiskars 9166 is ideal for situations in which you'd normally use bypass pruning shears (for small branches (say up to 3/8"), but need a longer reach, such as trimming large rose bushes.
> Because of the light-duty construction and bypass design, the Fiskars 9166 is NOT a good lopper for thick hardwood branches--it will likely jam, flex, and then bend or break in thick branches.
> If necessary and with care not to flex the jaws, you can cut hardwood branches up to about 1/2" or softwood branches up to 3/4".
> Used as I recommend, the Fiskars 9166 loppers should be much less fatiguing than heavier-duty loppers
> Caution: It is easy to think that you'll use the Fiskars 9166 loppers as I've described, but then in practice find yourself trying to cut many branches that are really too large. These are light-weight, light-duty loppers---great if you also have a heavy-duty anvil lopper for the big stuff. But if you are looking for a single general purpose extendable long-handle lopper, I recommend a heavier-duty compound design.

BACKGROUND---TYPES OF LOPPERS
> BYPASS vs ANVIL
> > Bypass lopper have two blades, like a pair of scissors, which move past one another. They cut cleanly, but have a tendency to jam in hard or dry wood, particularly in thick branches. They can also flex apart and bend or break (mostly when you twist them, trying to unjam them). If they have flexed or bent, then small branches will just jam between the blades rather than be cut.
> > Anvil loppers have one blade, usually straight, which cuts to a flat "anvil", like a knife on a cutting board. If not sharp, they have a tendency to crush rather than cut cleanly, but are less likely to jam., bend or break. Anvil loppers sometimes do not cut completely through soft fibrous material, particularly if the blades are dull. Comparing similar anvil and bypass loppers, the anvil loppers cut thick branches easier..
> > Bypass loppers work well closed "slow and easy", like scissors. Anvil loppers work best snapped close (like using a cleaver on a cutting board).
> > Bypass loppers have a sharp blade on the top and right, and a "dull" blade on the bottom and left. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades clockwise (relative to cutting a branch perpendicularly) to cut through the branch at an angle, bypass loppers are likely to jam. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades counterclockwise, the blades are likely flex apart and be bent or broken. So, with bypass loppers, it is best to cut thick branches perpendicular to the branch. The angle doesn't matter much when using anvil loppers.
> SIMPLE vs COMPOUND or GEARED
> > Compound loppers have built-in levers to give you more leverage, to cut thicker branches easier. Geared loppers do the same thing, but with one less lever. Most loppers over 18" long, or used to cut hard wood, over about 1/2" thick should be compound or geared. Short loppers (e.g., 12" ) are usually simple. .
> > A disadvantage of compound or geared loppers is that you have to spread the arms very wide to open up the jaws for a thick branch. But your arms have less power spread so far apart, and obstructions (such as other branches or walls) are likely to get in the way. If you can't back up (for example, if you are on a ladder), loppers that you have to spread very wide can "punch" yourself in the chest when you close them.
> RATCHETED LOPPERS
> > Ratcheted loppers give you more leverage (like compound or geared loppers, but more so) because of the ratchet mechanism, so you can squeeze, spread the handles again (without opening the jaws, and squeeze again closing the jaws some more. So, you can open the jaws wide without having to open the arms. The disadvantage of ratcheted loppers is that they are more time consuming) to use---it takes more time to "pump": the arms 4 times to close them, than just once. . So although fine for thin or soft-wood branches (especially in tight spaces), racheted loppers are best for thick hardwood branches, or individuals with limited arm strength, for example, because of arthritis. Since ratcheted loppers are usually built for heavy-duty use, they are usually much heavier than comparable light-duty loppers.
> STRAIGHT vs CURVED ANVIL LOPPERS
> > There are probably excellent reasons for curved jaws. However it is very hard to sharpen the curved blade of curve-jawed anvil loppers, and have them perfectly align with the anvil, which is important. However, it is easy to sharpen the blade of straight-jaw loppers (I use my belt sander), and to adjust the anvil to perfectly align with the sharpened blade. So, I only consider straight-jawed anvil loppers.

GENERALIZATIONS
> If you want the cleanest cuts possible, particularly in soft woods, use a bypass lopper, such as these.
> If you want more leverage (at the cost of less reach) use a compound or geared lopper.
> If you want to cut the thickest branches possible, use an anvil lopper, ideally a racheted anvil lopper
> If you want the maximum possible reach and leverage for thicker branches use a racheted lopper.

RECOMMENDATION
> Spray your loppers with WD-40 before and after using them. Before will make cutting, especially of thick branches, much easier. After will prevent them from rusting.


Corona FL 3420 Compound Action Anvil Lopper with Fiberglass Handles, 1-1/2" Cut, 31" Length
Corona FL 3420 Compound Action Anvil Lopper with Fiberglass Handles, 1-1/2" Cut, 31" Length
Price: $29.99
25 used & new from $25.91

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 30, 2015
CORONA FL3420 LOPPER
> Because of the anvil design and the relatively robust construction, The Corona FL3420 is an excellent lopper for moderately thick hardwood branches, say up to 1" in diameter. It can cut softwood branches up to about 1 1/2".
> Of course, if the blade gets dull (which is inevitable for anvil loppers) cutting gets harder. Also an anvil lopper with a dull blade often does not cut completely through fibrous material.
> Since the Corona FL3420 are compound and non-racheted, it is easy to punch yourself in the chest using them, especially when trying to cut thick branches, if you cannot step back (for example if standing on a ladder).
> If you want to trim delicate plants (which may have moderately thick, difficult-to-reach, branches, such as roses) a bypass lopper might be a better choice.
> For routinely cutting branches greater than 1" in diameter, a ratcheted anvil lopper might be a better choice.
> Although I have a dozen loppers, including 2 other long-handle or extendable-handle loppers, the Corona FL3420 is my favorite---the lopper I use for most jobs.

TYPES OF LOPPERS
> BYPASS vs ANVIL
>> Bypass lopper have two blades, like a pair of scissors, which move past one another. They cut cleanly, but have a tendency to jam in hard or dry wood, particularly in thick branches. They can also flex apart and bend or break (mostly when you twist them, trying to unjam them). If they have flexed or bent, then small branches will just jam between the blades rather than be cut.
>> Anvil loppers have one blade, usually straight, which cuts to a flat "anvil", like a knife on a cutting board. If not sharp, they have a tendency to crush rather than cut cleanly, but are less likely to jam., bend or break. Anvil loppers sometimes do not cut completely through soft fibrous material, particularly if the blades are dull. Comparing similar anvil and bypass loppers, the anvil loppers cut thick branches easier..
>> Bypass loppers work well closed "slow and easy", like scissors. Anvil loppers work best snapped close (like using a cleaver on a cutting board).
>> Bypass loppers have a sharp blade on the top and right, and a "dull" blade on the bottom and left. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades clockwise (relative to cutting a branch perpendicularly) to cut through the branch at an angle, bypass loppers are likely to jam. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades counterclockwise, the blades are likely flex apart and be bent or broken. So, with bypass loppers, it is best to cut thick branches perpendicular to the branch. The angle doesn't matter much when using anvil loppers.
> SIMPLE vs COMPOUND or GEARED
>> Compound loppers have built-in levers to give you more leverage, to cut thicker branches easier. Geared loppers do the same thing, but with one less lever. Most loppers over 18" long, or used to cut hard wood, over about 1/2" thick should be compound or geared. Short loppers (e.g., 12" ) are usually simple. .
>> A disadvantage of compound or geared loppers is that you have to spread the arms very wide to open up the jaws for a thick branch. But your arms have less power spread so far apart, and obstructions (such as other branches or walls) are likely to get in the way. If you can't back up (for example, if you are on a ladder), loppers that you have to spread very wide can "punch" yourself in the chest when you close them.
> RATCHETED LOPPERS
>> Ratcheted loppers give you more leverage (like compound or geared loppers, but more so) because of the ratchet mechanism, so you can squeeze, spread the handles again (without opening the jaws, and squeeze again closing the jaws some more. So, you can open the jaws wide without having to open the arms. The disadvantage of ratcheted loppers is that they are more time consuming) to use---it takes more time to "pump": the arms 4 times to close them, than just once. . So although fine for thin or soft-wood branches (especially in tight spaces), racheted loppers are best for thick hardwood branches, or individuals with limited arm strength, for example, because of arthritis. Since ratcheted loppers are usually built for heavy-duty use, they are usually much heavier than comparable light-duty loppers.
> STRAIGHT vs CURVED ANVIL LOPPERS
>> There are probably excellent reasons for curved jaws. However it is very hard to sharpen the curved blade of curve-jawed anvil loppers, and have them perfectly align with the anvil, which is important. However, it is easy to sharpen the blade of straight-jaw loppers (I use my belt sander), and to adjust the anvil to perfectly align with the sharpened blade. So, I only consider straight-jawed anvil loppers.

GENERALIZATIONS
> If you want the cleanest cuts possible, particularly in soft woods, use a bypass lopper.
> If you want to cut the thickest branches possible, particularly hardwood branches, use an anvil lopper, such as these. A ratcheted anvil lopper would be best for the thickest, hardest, branches, particularly in tight spaces..

RECOMMENDATION
> Spray your loppers with WD-40 before and after using them. Before will make cutting, especially of thick branches, much easier. After will prevent them from rusting.


Fiskars 25 Inch Extendable Power-Lever Lopper (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
Fiskars 25 Inch Extendable Power-Lever Lopper (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
Offered by CPO Outlets
Price: $21.26
43 used & new from $21.26

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 30, 2015
FRISKARS 25" EXTENDABLE LOPPERS
>> This is a compound bypass lopper. Therefore (see the discussion below for explanations) it cuts cleanly particularly through soft wood.
>> There are two advantages of the long arms: greater reach and more power. However both are compromised. Since the loppers are compound, you have to open the arms wide to open the jaws wide for even a moderately thick branch--but the wider you open the arms, the less reach you have. Similarly, you have to open the arms very wide for thick branches, but your arms have less power so far apart.

EVALUATION
> Because of the bypass design and the relatively light construction, this is NOT a good lopper for thick hardwood branches--it will likely jam, flex, and then bend or break.
> Because of the long arms, this is a good looper for moderately thick branches (say up to 1/2") when you need a long reach.
> If necessary and with care not to flex the jaws, you can cut hardwood branches up to about 3/4" or softwood branches up to 1 1/4".
> I had trouble with jamming in 1/2" hardwood limbs---but fortunately I noticed the flexing before I did any permanent damage to the loppers. I plan to reserve these loppers for small branches or softwoods in the future and use my Corona anvil loppers for hardwood branches. Corona FL 3420 Compound Action Anvil Lopper with Fiberglass Handles, 1-1/2" Cut, 31" Length

TYPES OF LOPPERS
> BYPASS vs ANVIL
>> Bypass lopper have two blades, like a pair of scissors, which move past one another. They cut cleanly, but have a tendency to jam in hard or dry wood, particularly in thick branches. They can also flex apart and bend or break (mostly when you twist them, trying to unjam them). If they have flexed or bent, then small branches will just jam between the blades rather than be cut.
>> Anvil loppers have one blade, usually straight, which cuts to a flat "anvil", like a knife on a cutting board. If not sharp, they have a tendency to crush rather than cut cleanly, but are less likely to jam., bend or break. Anvil loppers sometimes do not cut completely through soft fibrous material, particularly if the blades are dull. Comparing similar anvil and bypass loppers, the anvil loppers cut thick branches easier..
>> Bypass loppers work well closed "slow and easy", like scissors. Anvil loppers work best snapped close (like using a cleaver on a cutting board).
>> Bypass loppers have a sharp blade on the top and right, and a "dull" blade on the bottom and left. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades clockwise (relative to cutting a branch perpendicularly) to cut through the branch at an angle, bypass loppers are likely to jam. If you rotate (or tilt) the blades counterclockwise, the blades are likely flex apart and be bent or broken. So, with bypass loppers, it is best to cut thick branches perpendicular to the branch. The angle doesn't matter much when using anvil loppers.
> SIMPLE vs COMPOUND or GEARED
>> Compound loppers have built-in levers to give you more leverage, to cut thicker branches easier. Geared loppers do the same thing, but with one less lever. Most loppers over 18" long, or used to cut hard wood, over about 1/2" thick should be compound or geared. Short loppers (e.g., 12" ) are usually simple. .
>> A disadvantage of compound or geared loppers is that you have to spread the arms very wide to open up the jaws for a thick branch. But your arms have less power spread so far apart, and obstructions (such as other branches or walls) are likely to get in the way. If you can't back up (for example, if you are on a ladder), loppers that you have to spread very wide can "punch" yourself in the chest when you close them.
> RATCHETED LOPPERS
>> Ratcheted loppers give you more leverage (like compound or geared loppers, but more so) because of the ratchet mechanism, so you can squeeze, spread the handles again (without opening the jaws, and squeeze again closing the jaws some more. So, you can open the jaws wide without having to open the arms. The disadvantage of ratcheted loppers is that they are more time consuming) to use---it takes more time to "pump": the arms 4 times to close them, than just once. . So although fine for thin or soft-wood branches (especially in tight spaces), racheted loppers are best for thick hardwood branches, or individuals with limited arm strength, for example, because of arthritis. Since ratcheted loppers are usually built for heavy-duty use, they are usually much heavier than comparable light-duty loppers.
> STRAIGHT vs CURVED ANVIL LOPPERS
>> There are probably excellent reasons for curved jaws. However it is very hard to sharpen the curved blade of curve-jawed anvil loppers, and have them perfectly align with the anvil, which is important. However, it is easy to sharpen the blade of straight-jaw loppers (I use my belt sander), and to adjust the anvil to perfectly align with the sharpened blade. So, I only consider straight-jawed anvil loppers.

GENERALIZATIONS
> If you want the cleanest cuts possible, particularly in soft woods, use a bypass lopper, such as these.
> If you want to cut the thickest branches possible, use an anvil lopper, ideally a racheted anvil lopper
> If you want the maximum possible reach, use a racheted lopper.

RECOMMENDATION
> Spray your loppers with WD-40 before and after using them. Before will make cutting, especially of thick branches, much easier. After will prevent them from rusting.


Heavy Duty Muslin Clamps 4 1/2 inch 6 Pack
Heavy Duty Muslin Clamps 4 1/2 inch 6 Pack
Offered by ACM GLOBAL
Price: $8.44
11 used & new from $8.20

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, May 29, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> 4 1/2" long X 3 1/2" high X 5/8" thick
> Jaws open to 1 3/4" (maybe 2" if you strain), but are probably best used to clamp a maximum thickness of about 1"
> Jaw pads 5/8" x 7/8"
> Closer than the pads the inside of the jaw can grip round poles 7/8" to ~1 1/4" in diameter
> The pads pivot, so they are parallel to each other when gripping, which (while providing a strong gap) spreads out the pressure and does not damage surfaces.
> The pads have a grove down the center, perpendicular to the clamps which might be useful for gripping 1/8" to 1/4" poles.

EVALUATION
> The clamps I received are well made, and none are broken.
> I suspect that the reviewers who reported that they broke spread them too far---with the jaws open more than about an inch the tension is very strong. If you use them to clamp things less than about 1", I doubt that they would break.
> I'll report on my experience in the future.


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