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Stoney RSS Feed (Miami, FL)
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Florida Keys Wildflowers: A Field Guide to the Wildflowers, Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines of the Florida Keys
Florida Keys Wildflowers: A Field Guide to the Wildflowers, Trees, Shrubs and Woody Vines of the Florida Keys
by Roger L. Hammer
Edition: Paperback
Price: $21.69
26 used & new from $8.87

4.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 29, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
EVALUATION
> FKW includes many flowering trees and scrubs. Most of these have inconspicuous flowers which are often visible for only a few days per year. Trees and scrubs are better identified by other characteristics.
> For trees and scrubs, I recommend Trees of North America which you can get for 1 cent on Amazon. Some of the names of genuses (geni?) has changed, but the illustrations are great, and the coverage is thorough.
> Although there is significant overlap with Everglades Wildflowers: A Field Guide To Wildflowers Of The Historic Everglades, Including Big Cypress, Corkscrew, And Fakahatchee Swamps (Wildflowers in the National Parks Series) , the later is much stronger on herbaceous wild flowers (those without woody stems). You need both for reasonably complete coverage of the wild flowers of South Florida.

PROS
> Great rugged binding---can survive field use.
> Great sharp clear photos, beautifully reproduced.
> Arranged by flower color, which makes narrowing down possibilities quick, especially for individuals with little botanical knowledge or experience

CONS
> Arranged by flower color, which separates related species, and makes narrowing down possibilities difficult for those with botanical knowledge and experience. Moreover, flower colors of some species is variable.
> The "one photo per species" policy does not illustrate color or other variations.
> Many photos of flowers only, not including leaves or stems which are often important to identification. It is useless for identifying most of the plants when flowers are not present.
> The "Comments" usually nearly half of the text, are about the Latin meaning of the genus and/or species names, which is interesting, but not usually useful in identifying plants.
> The "Comments" rarely mention closely related species which also occur in South Florida, and rarely contain information on how to differentiate the species from similar species.


Cuisinart CPT-122 Compact 2-Slice Toaster
Cuisinart CPT-122 Compact 2-Slice Toaster
Price: $25.49
51 used & new from $24.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars NOTHING "COMPACT" ABOUT THIS (BAGEL) TOASTER, July 29, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
IN SHORT-- If you want a bagel toaster, you've found it. If you want a sliced-bread toaster, I'd keep looking.

MY APOLOGIES
I'm very critical when other reviewers claim that "it was smaller than I expected" or "it was larger than I expected", because it's stupid to buy a (size-important) product without checking measurements. The caveat is that Amazon often cites the measurements of the retail box rather than the actual product measurements. I thought that the quoted measurements for the CPT-122 were for the retail box.

ITS BIG
> There is nothing compact about this 2-slice toaster. From the photo, It looks (to me) as though it measures about 5" x 6" x 8", which would be reasonable for a "compact" toaster. In fact it measures 6.5" x 7" x 11"---larger than the "standard" toaster it is replacing. That may not matter to you. But for those of us with tiny kitchens, every inch counts.

OTHER ISSUES
> The widest bread slices it accommodates is a little over 5" wide---the bread I purchase is usually larger.
> The MINIMUM opening of the CPT-122 is 3/4" and it opens up to 1 1/4". So, it doesn't do well with thin-sliced bread, "pop-tarts" etc
> It toasts very unevenly. The side toward the outside is barely toasted compared to the inside side. That's great for bagels, but very poor for sliced bread.
>-> So, insert bagels with the cut side on the inside side. That way, the outside will only be lightly warmed. There is no point in using the bagel setting, because it doesn't do anything.


DSLRKIT Quick Hot Shoe Flash Stand Adapter with 1/4"-20 Tripod screw (pack of 2)
DSLRKIT Quick Hot Shoe Flash Stand Adapter with 1/4"-20 Tripod screw (pack of 2)
Offered by dslrkit
Price: $11.50

4.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB---with a home-made shim, July 29, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
IN SHORT
> A great idea for a needed product, but with design issues.

DESCRIPTION
> Measures 1 7/8" x 1 5/16" x 3/4"
> This is a quick-release mechanism for flash units, analogous to those used for cameras.
> With a ~1/2" long 1/4" x 20 thread screw, you can install the "flash stand adapter" on flash brackets which have 1/4" holes for the purpose.
> There is an extra slide-in shoe on the right side (in the photo).

HOW IT WORKS
> To release you rotate the lever out 90 degrees, it locks in the open position, and you can lift out your flash
>-> Alternatively (redundantly, and unnecessarily) you can push down on the square button on top and slide the flash off , but you can't slide it back on. So, I really don't see the point
> To lock (with the "flash stand adapter" in the open position), you just place the flash in the shoe, and push down, and the spring-loaded lever snaps to the closed position, holding your flash in place.

PROS
> With the caveats below, holds a flash unit more securely than a standard slide-in hotshoe.
> Works great with a tiny slave flash, but you don't really need a quick release for such a flash---they will stay in place in a standard slide-in shoe

CONS
> No instructions of any kind.
> The shoe is much too large for a standard flash foot. A big flash feels very woobly.
>-> The lever holds the flash securely front-to-back.
>-> The lip in front is too high, so a big flash woobles.
>-> Only the square button holds the flash left-to-right, but it the space is about 1/16" too big, so the flash shoe can slide right-left. With the groove to the left, it looks like perhaps a spring loaded clamp to hold the shoe of your flash laterally, or otherwise a sliding adjustment, to hold your flash shoe tightly . It isn't, and it doesn't
> The square button has no useful function. In my opinion, a simple "right side" to the flash shoe would have been better (it would have assisted holding your flash more securely).
> The "extra" flash shoe on the right side is about 1/8" short and too loose, but might be useful for a slave flash trigger.
> The lever spring broke the first time I used the DSLRKIT quick-release. So I replaced it with the second quick-release, which also broke the first time I actually used it. The DSLRKIT quick-release works fine holding it in your hand and attaching/detaching flashes, but as soon as you put it on a tripod or bracket, it breaks the first time you use it.
>--> But for me that was actually an improvement. Opening the quick-release against the spring moves the camera on my tripod, after I've carefully framed and focused---which is especially annoying in macro-photography when framing and focus are delicate operations. The "broken" DSLRKIT quick release is almost as secure, but opens and closes easily without disturbing my framing and focus.

SOLUTION
> It is easy to cut a 3/4" x 3/4" shim out of a piece of of old credit card to shim up the shoe so that it fits better. A small bit of white glue can hold the shim in place. With a shim, your flash won't wobble.
> A shim can also make the "extra" slide-in shoe tighter, albeit it will still be too short.


Everglades Wildflowers: A Field Guide To Wildflowers Of The Historic Everglades, Including Big Cypress, Corkscrew, And Fakahatchee Swamps (Wildflowers in the National Parks Series)
Everglades Wildflowers: A Field Guide To Wildflowers Of The Historic Everglades, Including Big Cypress, Corkscrew, And Fakahatchee Swamps (Wildflowers in the National Parks Series)
by Roger L. Hammer
Edition: Paperback
Price: $20.75
43 used & new from $4.63

4.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 24, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
PROS
> Great rugged binding---can survive field use.
> Great sharp clear photos, beautifully reproduced.
> Arranged by flower color, which makes narrowing down possibilities quick, especially for individuals with little botanical knowledge or experience

CONS
> Arranged by flower color, which separates related species, and makes narrowing down possibilities difficult for those with botanical knowledge and experience. Moreover, flower colors of some species is variable.
> The "one photo per species" policy does not illustrate color or other variations.
> Many photos of flowers only, not including leaves or stems which are often important to identification. It is useless for identifying most of the plants when flowers are not present. It is, as the title states, a guide to flowers---not a guide to flowering plants.
> The "Comments" usually nearly half of the text, are about the Latin meaning of the genus and/or species names, which is interesting, but not usually useful in identifying plants.
> The "Comments" rarely mention closely related species which also occur in South Florida, and rarely contain information on how to differentiate the species from similar species.
> Mostly devoted to large showy flowers of herbaceous plants (plants without woody stems). Many flowering shrubs with modest flowers are not included are not included.
> Doesn't mention whether the species are native or non-native. Many users may use Everglades Wildflowers as a guide to creating a native flower garden--and inadvertently choose non-natives instead of natives.

EXAMPLE (illustrating many of the shortcomings cited above)
The (only) photo of non-native Scarlet Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica) shows the red and yellow form of the flowers. Another entry for the native Asclepias tuberosa shows only the yellow flowers. So, users are likely to misidentify yellow A. curassavica as A. tuberosa.

Asclepias tuberosa also comes in a reddish-orange form, but without an accompanying photo of the reddish-orange form, users are likely to misidentify red A. tuberosa as another native A. lanceolata (by the photo of red flowers). All three species are easily distinguished for one another by the shape of their leaves---but the photos don't show the leaves (at least not adequately to help in identification).


Arkon Bike or Motorcycle Handlebar Camera Mount for Canon Sony Samsung Panasonic Nikon Cameras
Arkon Bike or Motorcycle Handlebar Camera Mount for Canon Sony Samsung Panasonic Nikon Cameras
Price: $13.18
14 used & new from $12.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 22, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
EVALUATION
> A good solid semi-permanent camera mount for ~1" (25mm) handlebars/rods/pipes/poles, with easy (but limited range) tilt adjustment, for lightweight cameras.

DESCRIPTION
> 2 1/2" wide X 1 1/2" X ~3" high to tip of camera screw when installed on a ~1" rod/pipe/pole.
> Comes with 2 rubbery pads which help grip the pole and absorb vibrations.
> Grips a ~1" rod/pipe/pole using 1 of the rubber pads.
>-> Could be installed on a ~1 1/8" pole without any pads, but probably would not grip as well, and you'd loose the vibration dampening.
>-> Could be installed on a 7/8" or smaller pole with both pads and/or additional padding, but might not grip as well.
> Range of tilt 45 degrees from vertical, 90 degrees total.
> For relatively lightweight equipment only, particularly on a bike or motorcycle.
> Oddly, the upper and lower portion of the mount are separated (as shown in the photo) by 3/8" when installed on a ~1" rod/pipe/pole.

COMPARED TO A TRIPOD BALLHEAD (available on some similar mounting devices)
> IN SHORT: The ballhead of the Arkon mount works well, better than a tripod ballhead in some respects or applications, but it is not as versatile as a tripod ballhead.
> A tripod ballhead with a comparable size ball would be taller, which results in unwelcome leverage making it easy to push your camera etc. out of orientation.
> The Arkon ballhead is movable when moderately tightened, and stays in place better than an ordinary ballhead. So, it is easy to position and reposition just by grabbing your camera and moving it where you want.
> When locked-down tight the Arkon ballhead ballead is less likely to spontaneously loosen than a comparable tripod ballhead.
> The Arkon ballhead does not have the multiple independent movements of a tripod ballhead. You screw on your device and then lock it in position. For example, there is no independent way to tighten your equipment on or to (in effect) adjust the length of the camera screw-thread.
> Tripod ballheads allow a full 180 degrees range of movement (tilt),the Arkon only 45 degrees from the vertical, 90 degrees total.
> The Arkon is all plastic, tripod ballheads are metal.
>-> The ball of the Arkon ballhead can pop out of its socket (if you mount heavy equipment and hit a hard bump--likely resulting in damage to your camera).
>-> The Arkon ballhead can can snap off at the neck (if you mount heavy equipment and hit a hard bump--likely resulting in damage to your camera).


S6 Case, Galaxy S6 Case, YEMARK(TM) Sky Blue with Be Happy Pattern Premium PU Leather Wallet Flip Protective Skin Case Cover with Stand For Samsung Galaxy S6[Built-in Credit Card/ID Card Holders],[+Stylus+Screen Protector+Cleaning Cloth], Samsung Galaxy S6 Case
S6 Case, Galaxy S6 Case, YEMARK(TM) Sky Blue with Be Happy Pattern Premium PU Leather Wallet Flip Protective Skin Case Cover with Stand For Samsung Galaxy S6[Built-in Credit Card/ID Card Holders],[+Stylus+Screen Protector+Cleaning Cloth], Samsung Galaxy S6 Case
Offered by YEMARK
Price: $9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 18, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
PROS
> Very thin, adds little to the bulk of your Galaxy 6.
> Magnetic closure tab, locks securely-closed almost automatically, opens easily.
> Hole for camera lens.
> 2 slots for credit cards, etc.
> Can work as a stand for Galaxy 6
> Easy grip surface, not slippery.
> Interior especially matches turquoise of turquoise Galaxy 6.

CONS
> Adds little protection to your cell phone from drops.
> Closure tab can get in the way of the screen.


Neewer® Camera Tripod Mounting Plate with Quick Release Slot Slide Block 1/4" and 3/8" Threaded Holes for Rod Clamp Support/dslr Rig Cag
Neewer® Camera Tripod Mounting Plate with Quick Release Slot Slide Block 1/4" and 3/8" Threaded Holes for Rod Clamp Support/dslr Rig Cag
Price: $12.73
11 used & new from $11.95

3.0 out of 5 stars DOES NOT DO THE JOB, July 15, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
PROS
> Well made.
> The quick-release has a positive locked-close lock, and a positive locked-open mechanism. Truly quick and secure, once you get the hang of it.
> Almost identical to, and interchangeable with XCSOURCE® Professional Ballhead with Quick Release Plate for Monopod Tripod Camera Canon 70D 60D 700D 650D 600D 1100D Nikon D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D3200 Pentax LF24.
> The bottom of the socket has a removable 1/4" adapter insert in a 3/8" hole. So you can attach the socket to 3/8" tripod threads.

CONS
> At first, the quick-release worked perfectly for me.
> After about a dozen cycles of opening/closing the mount, I noticed it "getting stuck" as other reviewers complain (i.e., it gets very hard to open the lever). A little silicon grease Permatex PERMATEX DIELECTRIC GREASE 22058 fixed the problem.
> After several more uses the plate was loose when locked-down. That is fixable by using a shim (such as a piece of aluminum from a cola can, about 3/16" x 1 1/4") glued to the plate.


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 9, 2015
MY EXPERIENCE
> A Dolica B103 ballhead came with my Dolica TX570DS Ultra Compact Tripod with Professional Ball Head and Built-In Monopod (Black) which is a great tripod for field macro photography. The Dolica ballhead has many advantages when photographing moving subjects, but I prefer an XCSOURCE® Professional Ballhead with Quick Release Plate for Monopod Tripod Camera Canon 70D 60D 700D 650D 600D 1100D Nikon D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D3200 Pentax LF24 for stationary subjects.
> The XCSource ballhead has about exactly the opposite set of design choices and features than the Dolica ballhead, and so, is useful for comparing the relative advantages/disadvantages of various ballhead designs and features.

PHOTOGRAPHING MOVING VS STATIONARY SUBJECTS
> For moving subjects, you want a ballhead to be loose, but with some drag. For stationary subjects, it is better if you can lock the ballhead quickly and securely.
>-> The drag of the Dolica ballhead is finely adjustable with a knob and the movement is more silky, partly because the ball is physically larger.
>-> The lever of the XCSource ballhead moves more quickly and "definitively, and is easier to tighten tigher.
> For moving subjects, it is often desirable to lock the vertical movement and pan horizontally, for which you need a separate panning feature, as on the Dolica ballhead. For stationary subjects, it is more convenient to have a single positioning control, so that you can rotate the ballhead and position it in one motion, as with the XCSource ballhead.

OTHER PROS AND DETAILS
> The position of the Dolica ballhead is controlled by a knob. XCSource ballhead is controlled by a lever.
>-> You can get more leverage with the lever on the XCSource ballhead. So you can loosen/tighten the XCSource quicker, tighter, and more securely. With the Dolica I often thought the positioning knob of the ballhead was tight, but then my camera flopped over. On one occasion that broke the shoe of my flash and could have caused the tripod to fall over.
>-> I have 4 other knobs on my focusing rail, plus 3 knobs (and one push-button) on the Dolica ballhead. I often have to look to find the right knob on the Dolica. The XCSource ballhead position lever is easy to distinguish from the knobs by touch. The quick-release lever on the XCSource locks in place and cannot be opened by accident.
> The position of the Dolica ballhead is controlled by two knobs, so you can lock the ballhead vertically, and still pan horizontally. The position of the XCSource ballhead is controlled by only one lever. So you can position the XCSource ballhead and rotate it in a single movement.
> The Dolica ballhead has only 1 notch, so you have to rotate the head 180 degrees to get the full vertical range of motion. There are two notches on the XCSource ballhead. So you can have the position lever on either the left side or on the right side of the XCSource ballhead, which ever is more convenient to you. You can move the camera to a high angle (say to photo a flying bird), using the back notch, and directly to a low angle (say to photo a bird on the ground), using the front notch.
> The XCSource ballhead is 3/8" shorter than the Dolica ballhead, which is important for near ground-level photography.
> The position lever of the XCSource ballhead is on the side. If you lay the Dolica tripod with the Dolica ballhead on the ground for ground level photograph, the position knob is on the ground and hard to reach. With the XCSource ballhead, the knob is on the side and easily accessible. That's also another 1" you can get closer to the ground for a total of 1 3/8" closer to the ground with the XCSource ballhead than with the Dolica.
> The quick-release plate of the Dolica ballhead is very solid, and can probably accommodate very heavy gear, but it isn't very "quick". The quick-release plate of the XCSource ballhead operates quickly and easily. It takes a little practice, but with practice, it is much easier to engage and disengage the quick-release plate of the XCSource ballhead.
> The D-ring of the camera screw on the Dolica quick-release plate does is spring-loaded and folds flat when not in use. The D-ring on the quick-release plate of the XCSource ballhead is not spring-loaded, so it can flop down and get in the way of engaging the plate in the quick release---which is very annoying when you are trying to change a camera quickly.


RainbowImaging LH-40 Lens Hood for Olympus M.Zuiko 14-42mm F3.5-6.6 II
RainbowImaging LH-40 Lens Hood for Olympus M.Zuiko 14-42mm F3.5-6.6 II
Price: $13.35
2 used & new from $13.29

3.0 out of 5 stars Does NOT fit Lumix 14-42mm lens, July 9, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
> Remarks by one reviewer about 37mm threads lead me to think that this might fit my Lumix 14-42mm PZ lens (since Lumix has NO lenshood for the lens).
> The lenshood is a bayonet design and does NOT attach to the lens by threads. It does NOT fit Lumix 14-42mm lenses.
> The lenshood looks well made and probably works well on the lens it is designed for.


XCSOURCE® Professional Ballhead with Quick Release Plate for Monopod Tripod Camera Canon 70D 60D 700D 650D 600D 1100D Nikon D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D3200 Pentax LF24
XCSOURCE® Professional Ballhead with Quick Release Plate for Monopod Tripod Camera Canon 70D 60D 700D 650D 600D 1100D Nikon D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D3200 Pentax LF24
Offered by xcsource
Price: $15.99
2 used & new from $15.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, July 8, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
MY EXPERIENCE
> The Dolica B103 Ballhead which came with my Dolica TX570DS Ultra Compact Tripod with Professional Ball Head and Built-In Monopod (Black) has about exactly the opposite set of design choices and features than the XCSource ballhead, and so, is useful for comparing the relative advantages/disadvantages of various ballhead designs and features.
> For field macrophotography of stationary subjects---the XCSource ballhead is far superior to the Dolica. But, will keep the Dolica ballhead for photographing birds, squirrels, and butterflies.

PHOTOGRAPHING MOVING VS STATIONARY SUBJECTS
The XCSource ballhead is better for photographing stationary subjects. The Dolica B103 Ball Head is better for following moving objects.
>-> For moving subjects, you want a ballhead to be loose, but with some drag. For stationary subjects, it is better if you can lock the ballhead quickly and securely.
>->-> The drag of the Dolica ballhead is finely adjustable with a knob and the movement is more silky, partly because the ball is physically larger.
>->-> The lever of the XCSource ballhead moves more quickly and "definitively", i.e., either loose or locked in place, with little in-between.
>-> For moving subjects, it is often desirable to lock the vertical movement and pan horizontally, for which you need a separate panning feature. For stationary subjects, it is more convenient to have a single positioning control, so that you can rotate the ballhead and position it in one motion.
>->-> The XCSource ballhead has a single positioning control; the Dolica ballhead has a separate panning feature.

OTHER PROS AND DETAILS
> Inexpensive extra quick-release plates for the XCSource ballhead Neewer® Camera Tripod Mounting Plate with Quick Release Slot Slide Block 1/4" and 3/8" Threaded Holes for Rod Clamp Support/dslr Rig Cag, or additional ballheads, are available.
> The position of the XCSource ballhead is controlled by a lever rather than a knob (on the Dolica ballhead).
>-> You can get more leverage with a lever (on the XCSource ballhead) than with a knob (on the Dolica). So you can loosen/tighten the XCSource quicker, tighter, and more securely. With the Dolica I often thought the positioning knob of the ballhead was tight, but then my camera flopped over. On one occasion that broke the shoe of my flash and could have caused the tripod to fall over.
>-> I have 4 other knobs on my focusing rail, plus 3 knobs on my Dolica ballhead. The XCSource ballhead position lever is easy to distinguish from the knobs by touch. So I can more easily reposition the XCSource ballhead without having to look. I often had to look to find the right knob on the Dolica.
> The position of the XCSource ballhead is controlled by only one knob (the Dolica by two). So I can position the XCSource ballhead and rotate it in a single movement.
> There are two notches on the XCSource ballhead. So you can have the position lever on either the left side or on the right side of the XCSource ballhead, which ever is more convenient to you. You can move the camera to a high angle (say to photo a flying bird), using the back notch, and directly to a low angle (say to photo a bird on the ground), using the front notch. The Dolica ballhead has only 1 notch, so you have to rotate the head 180 degrees to get the full vertical range of motion.
> The XCSource ballhead is 3/8" shorter than the Dolica ballhead, which is important for near ground-level photography.
> The position lever of the XCSource ballhead is on the side. If you lay the Dolica tripod with the Dolica ballhead on the ground for ground level photograph, the position knob is on the ground and hard to reach. With the XCSource ballhead, the knob is on the side and easily accessible. That's also another 1" you can get closer to the ground for a total of 1 3/8" closer to the ground with the XCSource ballhead than with the Dolica.
> The quick-release plate of the XCSource ballhead has a positive locked-close lock, and a positive locked-open mechanism. It takes a little practice, but with practice, it is much easier to engage and disengage the quick-release plate of the XCSource ballhead. In contrast the quick-release plate of the Dolica ballhead is awkward, albeit possibly more solid if you are using very heavy camera gear.

OTHER CONS
> The D-ring of the camera screw on the quick-release plate of the XCSource ballhead is not spring-loaded, so it can flop down and get in the way of engaging the plate in the quick release---which is very annoying when you are trying to change a camera quickly. The D-ring on the Dolica quick-release plate does is spring-loaded and folds flat when not in use). I recommend taping down the D-ring on the the XCSource ballhead with blue painter's tape 3M Painter's Tape, Multi-Use, .94-Inch by 60-Yard.


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