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Stoney RSS Feed (Miami, FL)
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Westcott Shatter-Resistant Plastic Ruler, 6 Inches, Transparent (45016)
Westcott Shatter-Resistant Plastic Ruler, 6 Inches, Transparent (45016)
Price: $1.49
29 used & new from $0.88

3.0 out of 5 stars OKAY, EXCEPT FOR A HARD-TO-REMOVE STICKER, October 31, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
BIG PERMANENT LABEL
> Repeating the critique of another reviewer: "These do what rulers do, but they put a price sticker on the back that is impossible to remove, thereby defeating the purpose of buying a "clear" ruler. Now I need to find a solvent that will remove the sticker without destroying the clear plastic ruler."
> As another reviewer noted, the photo is inaccurate, the rulers are a similar, but different style.

TO REMOVE THE LABEL
>> Soak in water until you can scrape most of the paper and glue off with your fingernail.
>> Spray WD40 on the remaining gum (residual glue) and wipe off with a cotton cloth. Alternatively you can use cooking oil to dissolve the gum. Isopropyl alcohol will work, but requires more wiping.


Cosmos Pack of 3 Black Color Back Adhesive SIM/ID/Credit Card pocket pouch sleeve holder for Apple iPhone 4 4S cellphone
Cosmos Pack of 3 Black Color Back Adhesive SIM/ID/Credit Card pocket pouch sleeve holder for Apple iPhone 4 4S cellphone
Offered by Cosmos Tech&Leisure
Price: $8.99
2 used & new from $4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, October 30, 2014
DESCRIPTION
> Thin black soft stretchy fabric front, won't scratch a surface.
> Plastic back with adhesive backing. Just peel off the backing and attach it to your cellphone.
> Very thin, about as thick as a credit card. Doesn't get in the way or make your cellphone unstable on a surface.
> As long as your cell phone has an unused surface as large as a credit card (i.e., without obscuring the camera lens, switches, etc.), a Cosmos Card Pocket can be installed on it.

EVALUATION
> The fabric front can sag a little as you insert a card---not really problem
> Holds a single card securely, but several would not be so secure.
>> While it will hold several cards, it's nuts to try to stuff 5 or 6 cards into it as one review boasts.
> Like using any adhesive, it is important to clean the surface of your cell phone first. Use isopropyl alcohol and a cloth, or an alcohol wipe. Using superglue to attach the pocket, as one reviewer suggests, is absurd.


Cosmos® Pack of 5 Black Color of Adhesive Sim/id/credit Card Pocket Pouch Sleeve Holder for Iphone/galaxy S/android/blackberry/windows Smartphones
Cosmos® Pack of 5 Black Color of Adhesive Sim/id/credit Card Pocket Pouch Sleeve Holder for Iphone/galaxy S/android/blackberry/windows Smartphones
Offered by Cosmos Tech&Leisure
Price: $10.99
2 used & new from $6.99

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, October 30, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> Thin black soft stretchy fabric front, won't scratch a surface.
> Plastic back with adhesive.
> Very thin, about as thick as a credit card. Doesn't get in the way or make your cellphone unstable on a surface.

EVALUATION
> The fabric front can sag a little as you insert a card---not really problem
> Holds a single card securely.
>> While it will hold several cards, it's nuts to try to stuff 5 or 6 cards into it.
> Like using any adhesive, it is important to clean the surface of your cell phone first. Use isopropyl alcohol and a cloth, or an alcohol wipe.


SE GC5002L Extra-Tough Collapsible Leaf Bag with Zippered Lid-Green
SE GC5002L Extra-Tough Collapsible Leaf Bag with Zippered Lid-Green
Offered by QualityTOOLSupply
Price: $13.71
7 used & new from $13.71

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, October 30, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> ~17" in diameter x 22" high
> Very similar to Fiskars 10 Gallon Kangaroo Gardening Bag (94046974J), but $5 cheaper, and comes with a zipper top and a storage bag.
> The storage bag makes it easy to store the leaf bag. The storage bag is a bit on the flimsy side, but the competition doesn't come with a storage bag.
> The top zipper is not as strong as they could be, and easily jams on piping inside. But the competition doesn't even have a closeable top.

USE
> Great as leaf bags.
> Great temporary trash bags.
> Useful as dirty cloths hampers for camping, etc.
>> Caveat, for transporting large bulky items, Ikea sail bags are cheaper and better LARGE VOLUME ~ IKEA Tote Bags~ SET of (5), mostly because it is awkward to carry full "leaf bags" around.
> Don't zipper the lid closed when you store the bag. If you must open/close the zipper, do so carefully.


Polaroid HD Slide Duplicator With Macro Lens Capabilty For The Nikon 1 J1, J2, J3, V1, V2, S1, D40, D40x, D50, D60, D70, D80, D90, D100, D200, D300, D3, D3S, D700, D3000, D5000, D3100, D3200, D7000, D5100, D4, D800, D800E, D600, D610, D7100, D5200, D5300 Digital SLR Cameras
Polaroid HD Slide Duplicator With Macro Lens Capabilty For The Nikon 1 J1, J2, J3, V1, V2, S1, D40, D40x, D50, D60, D70, D80, D90, D100, D200, D300, D3, D3S, D700, D3000, D5000, D3100, D3200, D7000, D5100, D4, D800, D800E, D600, D610, D7100, D5200, D5300 Digital SLR Cameras
Offered by DBROTH
Price: $34.99

4.0 out of 5 stars ADEQUATE, October 25, 2014
DESIGN
> The Polaroid Slide Duplicator is designed to work with an 40-60mm zoom lens (in M4/3 format, = 60-90mm in APS-C format [most DSLRs], =80-120mm in 35mm film format) or equivalent, because there is no way to adjust the distance between the lens and the subject (i.e., the slide you are copying). You can only do so by changing the focal length, which means you must have a zoom lens.
> Ideally, the image will correspond to a 35mm slide at about 50mm (in M4/3 format, =75mm in APS-C format, =100mm in 35mm format).
> That means that it is probably IMPOSSIBLE to make good copies of slides, using the Polaroid Slide Duplicator AS DESIGNED.
>> Zooms are not as sharp as prime lenses. The performance of most zooms adapted to 1:1 photography is miserable.
>> The barrels of many zooms rotate as you focus, which is causes the slide stage to rotate, making the Polaroid Slide Duplicator virtually unusable.
> However, with the right combination of equipment and luck, it is possible to make adequate copies with a zoom lens, very good copies with a prime lens (meaning a non-zoom), and excellent copies with a macro lens.

WHATS INCLUDED
In addition to the slide stage:
> The large bulge on the end of the Polaroid Slide Duplicator tube is a removable 52mm-thread-diameter closeup lens (probably +10 diopter), NOT RECOMMENDED.
> A 52mm rear screw in cap.
> A 52mm-58mm "filter" adapter, which is useful only if your lens takes 58mm "accessories" (i.e., filters, lenshoods, and lenscaps).

WHAT ELSE YOU'LL NEED
> Unless you have a macro lens, to get your lens to focus down to the size of a 35mm slide you'll need extension tubes and/or screw-in closeup lenses, for example HOYA 52mm Close up Filter Set +1,+2, +4 , Close-Up Set For all 52MM Front thread lenses. If your lens has a aperture ring, you can use the cheapest type extension tubes, for example Macro Extension Tube Ring Micro 4/3 M4/3 EP3 GF1 E-PL1 GF2 G1 EPM1 G3 Mount Camera. If your lens does not have an aperture ring, you'll need more expensive "auto" extension tubes. If you are adapting an old camera lens with a different mount than your camera, you can use the extension tubes for that system.
> If you use a lens with a different mount (such a 50mm f2 lens from an old film camera, or a macro lens with a different mount), you'll need a mount adapter. If your lens has a aperture ring, you can use the cheapest type adapters, for example: PK-M4/3 Lens Mount Adapter Ring Pentax PK Lens to MICRO 4/3 Body E-PM2 EM5 EPL5 GF5 GF3. If your lens does not have an aperture ring, you'll need a more expensive adapter, for example: Fotodiox 10-New -PK-M43 Lens Mount Adapter with Aperture Dial, Digital Pentax AF Lens to MFT Micro 4/3 System Camera Mount Adapter.
> Unless the filter thread of your lens is 52mm, you'll need a "step-up" "filter" adapter corresponding to the filter thread of your lens. For example: if your lens takes 49mm "accessories", then you need a 49-52mm step-up adapter; if your lens takes 55mm "accessories", then you need a 55-52mm step-down adapter.
> If you use a prime lens (i.e., a non-zoom), you may need extension rings (do not confuse with extension tubes), to adjust the distance between the lens and the subject (i.e., the slide you are copying), which is essential in order to focus on your slide.
>> Cheap non-auto extension tube sets, for example [ASIN:B00C2P3JPE Macro Extension Tube Ring Micro 4/3 M4/3 EP3 GF1 E-PL1 GF2 G1 EPM1 G3 Mount Camera]] consists of three 52mm extension rings in 7, 14, and 28mm lengths, and male/female mount adapters. The adapters screwed together make a short extension tube (which may fill your need for an extension tube), which can be expanded with the rings, but you can also use the rings between your lens and the Slide Duplicator. The extension rings can also be purchased separately: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Ring / Spacer 7mm long: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Tube / 14mm long: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Tube / 28mm long.
>> 52mm diameter filters with the glass removed, make excellent, cheaper, and better ~5mm-lenth extension rings--because the smaller increments give you more options. There is a tool for taking out the glass: 52mm 52 Lens Repair Silicone Rubber Tool / Filter Wrench Remove Front Retaining Ring Scratch Free!. If you don't have old filters, you can buy 5 for $11 XCSOURCE® 52mm Color Filter Blue Yellow Orange Red Green + Lens Cap + 6 slot Case for Nikon D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D3200 D3100 D3000 D90 D4 D3X D800 D700 D600 D300S D300 D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D5000 D3200 D3100 D3000 D90 D80 D70 D60 D50 D40 LF68

USE WITH A ZOOM LENS
> It is essential that the barrel of your zoom does not rotate when you zoom or focus.
> If you have a choice of zoom lenses, short (but covering the 40-60mm range (in M4/3 format, = 60-90mm in APS-C format, =80-120 in 35mm format) is better than long, and a narrow range is probably better than a wide range. E.g. 25-75mm is better than 14-100mm.

EXAMPLE 1: My 14-42mm Lumix PZ (pancake zoom lens) does not revolve, and therefore is potentially adequate, albeit a little short at maximum zoom. With a 10mmm extension tube, a 37-52mm "filter" adapter, and my lens at 42mm (=84mm in 35mm format), I can fill about 80% of the camera frame (with the image of a 35mm slide in focus). At f11, the center is sharp but the edges of the frame are very "soft". Note that the "kit" 14-42mm lens is a different lens, and may or may work better or worse. A slightly longer zoom would be better, but the quality of the image would probably be as poor or worse.

USE WITH A "PRIME LENS" (meaning a non-zoom)
> Prime lenses produce far superior results when adapted for closeup work than zooms--but the results would not be as good as a macro-lens.
> You can use a prime meant for your system (50mm for M4/3 format camera, or 75mm for APS-C format cameras), but those focal lengths are not common, and you should not buy such a lens for this purpose.
> As long as the lens elements are clear (no fungus or haze) and you can manually adjust the aperture, an old 50mm lens from an old 35mm film camera with a cheap non-auto adapter would probably work well on a M4/3 format camera. For this purpose, (all other things being equal) slower lenses are probably better for this purpose than faster lenses, i.e., an f2.8 is probably better than an f1.2.
> With your camera adjusted so that the image of your slide approximately fills your camera frame with the image in focus:
>>> If more than the slide image fills your camera frame (part of the paper holder is in your camera frame), you can crop the image later using graphics software (not included), although you'll be loosing pixels (resolution).
>>> If not all of he slide image fits into your camera frame, you can add extension rings until it does.

USE WITH A MACRO LENS
> A good macro-lens is the only way to make good quality copies of slides. For example: a Panasonic Leica DG Macro-Elmarit 45mm/F2.8 (=90mm in 35mm format) macro lens, would probably work well.

EXAMPLE 2: With a Pentax K to M4/3 adapter (see above), a 50mm f4 Pentax Macro lens (= 100mm in M4/3 format), a 49-52mm "filter" adapter, and about 20mm of additional 52mm diameter extension rings, the camera image is almost exactly filled and in focus (with the image of a 35mm slide. It looks like this will be an ideal setup, when I acquire the exact set of extension rings. A screw-in Pentax 50mm macro (or a macro of a different brand) would be just as good, with the appropriate adapter.
> With Lumix cameras it is necessary to set the camera to operate "without a lens": Menu > Custom settings ("C" with a wrench) > Shoot w/o lens > on.
> With Lumix cameras (and others if you have this option), set the aspect ratio to 2:3, which corresponds to the shape of 35mm slide images.

OPERATION OF THE POLAROID SLIDE DUPLICATOR
> The slide stage rotates 360 degrees, and can be locked in place.
> The slide stage slides up and down, and even completely off, but doesn't hold in place well.
>>> You can probably add thin strips of tape (such as Blue Painter's tape which is easy removable) to increase the friction.
> The slide-holder slides from side-to-side.
> With these three movements you can crop parts of a slide, etc.
> However, with all these movements, simply copying a whole slide is far more difficult than it should be. You have to orient each slide, one at a time. I'd be tempted to tape the stage in place (with double-sided foamy tape), because I don't want to crop slides, or mess with fancy effects---I just want to copy them. Besides, using a macro-lens (instead of a zoom), I don't have the option to crop anyway.
> Rather than the included closeup lens (NOT recommended), you can get better results with extension tubes and/or weaker closeup lens. I suggest a set of screw-in closeup lenses (+1, +2, and +3 or +4 diopter. Use the weakest closeup lens which works with your lens. For best results, use one closeup lens at a time--do not stack them.
> Set your lens at f11 or f16. Keep the camera and adapter still (best on a tripod with a remote shutter cable).
> The white diffuser is protected with clear plastic which you need to peel off, but after doing so, protect the diffuser from scratches etc.
> Do not aim a light source at the slide copier (that will accentuate dust and flaws in the diffuser). Instead illuminate a square of white cardboard, and aim the slide copier at the cardboard. A halogen desk lamp would be ideal.

COMMENT ON EQUIVALENT FOCAL LENGTHS
> It is easy to get confused. The focal length is always the same. A 50mm lens (for example) is a 50mm lens regardless of the format of the camera. What can be different is the size of the sensor in your camera. The sensor in an 4/3 format camera is ½ the size of 35mm format. The sensor in an APS-C camera is ¾ the size of 35mm format. I include 35mm "equivalents", because that is the standard you can use to compare other formats.

OTHER OPTIONS
> The Opteka HD2 slide duplicators appear have all of the same problems and limitations, with one exception:
>> The slide stage of the Opteka apparently does not move around (a good thing).
>> The diffuser of the Opteka is closer to the slide, increasing the probablilty that defects, dust, etc on the diffuser will be in focus and appear on the image.
> Thus, it is a toss-up.


Polaroid HD Slide Duplicator With Macro Lens Capabilty For The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3, DMC-GF3, DMC-G1, DMC-GH1, DMC-GH2, DMC-GH3, DMC-GH4, DMC-L10, DMC-GF1, DMC-GF2, DMC-G10, DMC-G2, DMC-GF3, DMC-G3, DMC-GF5, DMC-G5, DMC-GF6, DMC-G6, DMC-GX7, DMC-GM1 Digital SLR Cameras
Polaroid HD Slide Duplicator With Macro Lens Capabilty For The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3, DMC-GF3, DMC-G1, DMC-GH1, DMC-GH2, DMC-GH3, DMC-GH4, DMC-L10, DMC-GF1, DMC-GF2, DMC-G10, DMC-G2, DMC-GF3, DMC-G3, DMC-GF5, DMC-G5, DMC-GF6, DMC-G6, DMC-GX7, DMC-GM1 Digital SLR Cameras
Offered by DBROTH
Price: $34.99

3.0 out of 5 stars ADEQUATE, October 22, 2014
DESIGN
> The Polaroid Slide Duplicator is designed to work with an 40-60mm zoom lens (in M4/3 format, = 60-90mm in APS-C format [most DSLRs], =80-120mm in 35mm film format) or equivalent, because there is no way to adjust the distance between the lens and the subject (i.e., the slide you are copying). You can only do so by changing the focal length, which means you must have a zoom lens.
> Ideally, the image will correspond to a 35mm slide at about 50mm (in M4/3 format, =75mm in APS-C format, =100mm in 35mm format).
> That means that it is probably IMPOSSIBLE to make good copies of slides, using the Polaroid Slide Duplicator AS DESIGNED.
>> Zooms are not as sharp as prime lenses. The performance of most zooms adapted to 1:1 photography is miserable.
>> The barrels of many zooms rotate as you focus, which is causes the slide stage to rotate, making the Polaroid Slide Duplicator virtually unusable.
> However, with the right combination of equipment and luck, it is possible to make adequate copies with a zoom lens, very good copies with a prime lens (meaning a non-zoom), and excellent copies with a macro lens.

WHATS INCLUDED
In addition to the slide stage:
> The large bulge on the end of the Polaroid Slide Duplicator tube is a removable 52mm-thread-diameter closeup lens (probably +10 diopter), NOT RECOMMENDED.
> A 52mm rear screw in cap.
> A 52mm-58mm "filter" adapter, which is useful only if your lens takes 58mm "accessories" (i.e., filters, lenshoods, and lenscaps).

WHAT ELSE YOU'LL NEED
> Unless you have a macro lens, to get your lens to focus down to the size of a 35mm slide you'll need extension tubes and/or screw-in closeup lenses, for example HOYA 52mm Close up Filter Set +1,+2, +4 , Close-Up Set For all 52MM Front thread lenses. If your lens has a aperture ring, you can use the cheapest type extension tubes, for example Macro Extension Tube Ring Micro 4/3 M4/3 EP3 GF1 E-PL1 GF2 G1 EPM1 G3 Mount Camera. If your lens does not have an aperture ring, you'll need more expensive "auto" extension tubes. If you are adapting an old camera lens with a different mount than your camera, you can use the extension tubes for that system.
> If you use a lens with a different mount (such a 50mm f2 lens from an old film camera, or a macro lens with a different mount), you'll need a mount adapter. If your lens has a aperture ring, you can use the cheapest type adapters, for example: PK-M4/3 Lens Mount Adapter Ring Pentax PK Lens to MICRO 4/3 Body E-PM2 EM5 EPL5 GF5 GF3. If your lens does not have an aperture ring, you'll need a more expensive adapter, for example: Fotodiox 10-New -PK-M43 Lens Mount Adapter with Aperture Dial, Digital Pentax AF Lens to MFT Micro 4/3 System Camera Mount Adapter.
> Unless the filter thread of your lens is 52mm, you'll need a "step-up" "filter" adapter corresponding to the filter thread of your lens. For example: if your lens takes 49mm "accessories", then you need a 49-52mm step-up adapter; if your lens takes 55mm "accessories", then you need a 55-52mm step-down adapter.
> If you use a prime lens (i.e., a non-zoom), you may need extension rings (do not confuse with extension tubes), to adjust the distance between the lens and the subject (i.e., the slide you are copying), which is essential in order to focus on your slide.
>> Cheap non-auto extension tube sets, for example [ASIN:B00C2P3JPE Macro Extension Tube Ring Micro 4/3 M4/3 EP3 GF1 E-PL1 GF2 G1 EPM1 G3 Mount Camera]] consists of three 52mm extension rings in 7, 14, and 28mm lengths, and male/female mount adapters. The adapters screwed together make a short extension tube (which may fill your need for an extension tube), which can be expanded with the rings, but you can also use the rings between your lens and the Slide Duplicator. The extension rings can also be purchased separately: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Ring / Spacer 7mm long: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Tube / 14mm long: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Tube / 28mm long.
>> 52mm diameter filters with the glass removed, make excellent, cheaper, and better ~5mm-lenth extension rings--because the smaller increments give you more options. There is a tool for taking out the glass: 52mm 52 Lens Repair Silicone Rubber Tool / Filter Wrench Remove Front Retaining Ring Scratch Free!. If you don't have old filters, you can buy 5 for $11 XCSOURCE® 52mm Color Filter Blue Yellow Orange Red Green + Lens Cap + 6 slot Case for Nikon D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D3200 D3100 D3000 D90 D4 D3X D800 D700 D600 D300S D300 D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D5000 D3200 D3100 D3000 D90 D80 D70 D60 D50 D40 LF68

USE WITH A ZOOM LENS
> It is essential that the barrel of your zoom does not rotate when you zoom or focus.
> If you have a choice of zoom lenses, short (but covering the 40-60mm range (in M4/3 format, = 60-90mm in APS-C format, =80-120 in 35mm format) is better than long, and a narrow range is probably better than a wide range. E.g. 25-75mm is better than 14-100mm.

EXAMPLE 1: My 14-42mm Lumix PZ (pancake zoom lens) does not revolve, and therefore is potentially adequate, albeit a little short at maximum zoom. With a 10mmm extension tube, a 37-52mm "filter" adapter, and my lens at 42mm (=84mm in 35mm format), I can fill about 80% of the camera frame (with the image of a 35mm slide in focus). At f11, the center is sharp but the edges of the frame are very "soft". Note that the "kit" 14-42mm lens is a different lens, and may or may work better or worse. A slightly longer zoom would be better, but the quality of the image would probably be as poor or worse.

USE WITH A "PRIME LENS" (meaning a non-zoom)
> Prime lenses produce far superior results when adapted for closeup work than zooms--but the results would not be as good as a macro-lens.
> You can use a prime meant for your system (50mm for M4/3 format camera, or 75mm for APS-C format cameras), but those focal lengths are not common, and you should not buy such a lens for this purpose.
> As long as the lens elements are clear (no fungus or haze) and you can manually adjust the aperture, an old 50mm lens from an old 35mm film camera with a cheap non-auto adapter would probably work well on a M4/3 format camera. For this purpose, (all other things being equal) slower lenses are probably better for this purpose than faster lenses, i.e., an f2.8 is probably better than an f1.2.
> With your camera adjusted so that the image of your slide approximately fills your camera frame with the image in focus:
>>> If more than the slide image fills your camera frame (part of the paper holder is in your camera frame), you can crop the image later using graphics software (not included), although you'll be loosing pixels (resolution).
>>> If not all of he slide image fits into your camera frame, you can add extension rings until it does.

USE WITH A MACRO LENS
> A good macro-lens is the only way to make good quality copies of slides. For example: a Panasonic Leica DG Macro-Elmarit 45mm/F2.8 (=90mm in 35mm format) macro lens, would probably work well.

EXAMPLE 2: With a Pentax K to M4/3 adapter (see above), a 50mm f4 Pentax Macro lens (= 100mm in M4/3 format), a 49-52mm "filter" adapter, and about 20mm of additional 52mm diameter extension rings, the camera image is almost exactly filled and in focus (with the image of a 35mm slide. It looks like this will be an ideal setup, when I acquire the exact set of extension rings. A screw-in Pentax 50mm macro (or a macro of a different brand) would be just as good, with the appropriate adapter.
> With Lumix cameras it is necessary to set the camera to operate "without a lens": Menu > Custom settings ("C" with a wrench) > Shoot w/o lens > on.

OPERATION OF THE POLAROID SLIDE DUPLICATOR
> The slide stage rotates 360 degrees, and can be locked in place.
> The slide stage slides up and down, and even completely off, but doesn't hold in place well.
>>> You can probably add thin strips of tape (such as Blue Painter's tape which is easy removable) to increase the friction.
> The slide-holder slides from side-to-side.
> With these three movements you can crop parts of a slide, etc.
> However, with all these movements, simply copying a whole slide is far more difficult than it should be. You have to orient each slide, one at a time. I'd be tempted to tape the stage in place (with double-sided foamy tape), because I don't want to crop slides, or mess with fancy effects---I just want to copy them. Besides, using a macro-lens (instead of a zoom), I don't have the option to crop anyway.
> Rather than the included closeup lens (NOT recommended), you can get better results with extension tubes and/or weaker closeup lens. I suggest a set of screw-in closeup lenses (+1, +2, and +3 or +4 diopter. Use the weakest closeup lens which works with your lens. For best results, use one closeup lens at a time--do not stack them.
> Set your lens at f11 or f16. Keep the camera and adapter still (best on a tripod with a remote shutter cable).
> The white diffuser is protected with clear plastic which you need to peel off, but after doing so, protect the diffuser from scratches etc.
> Do not aim a light source at the slide copier (that will accentuate dust and flaws in the diffuser). Instead illuminate a square of white cardboard, and aim the slide copier at the cardboard. A halogen desk lamp would be ideal.

COMMENT ON EQUIVALENT FOCAL LENGTHS
> It is easy to get confused. The focal length is always the same. A 50mm lens (for example) is a 50mm lens regardless of the format of the camera. What can be different is the size of the sensor in your camera. The sensor in an 4/3 format camera is ½ the size of 35mm format. The sensor in an APS-C camera is ¾ the size of 35mm format. I include 35mm "equivalents", because that is the standard you can use to compare other formats.


Neewer® Automatic Macro Extension Tube DG 10MM+16MM FT1 for Micro Four Thirds M4/3 Camera, fits Olympus PEN E-P1 P2 P3 P5 E-PL1 PL1s PL2 PL3 PL5 PL6 E-PM1 PM2 OM-D E-M5 E-M1 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 GH2 GH3 GX7 G1 G2 G10 G3 G5 G6 GF1 GF2 GF3 GF5 GF6 GX1 GM
Neewer® Automatic Macro Extension Tube DG 10MM+16MM FT1 for Micro Four Thirds M4/3 Camera, fits Olympus PEN E-P1 P2 P3 P5 E-PL1 PL1s PL2 PL3 PL5 PL6 E-PM1 PM2 OM-D E-M5 E-M1 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 GH2 GH3 GX7 G1 G2 G10 G3 G5 G6 GF1 GF2 GF3 GF5 GF6 GX1 GM
Offered by New Harbor
Price: $29.95
10 used & new from $24.96

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ADEQUATE, October 22, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
DESCRIPTION
> Provides all the electronic connections for auto-exposure, auto-focus, etc.
> Visually the extension tubes appear to be very well made.
> The "body" of the tubes are plastic---but that isn't obvious, and the plastic is strong enough for ordinary lenses.
> On the outside the finish is a dull and pebbly (which kinda looks as though cola or some other sticky soft drink dried on it). The finish isn't too objectionable, but doesn't match my camera, nor any camera I've ever owned.
> The bayonet parts are metal, but are NOT the machined polished stainless steel of good camera mounts (or of the other brands of extension tubes I own). The metal is probably cast zinc.
> In the set I received, the short tube fits well. But the longer tube fits tight, and sounds gritty when I install it.
> However, the price needs to be taken into consideration---at the price, these tubes are a very good value.

IN USE
> I now remember why I never used the my Pentax extension tubes with my Pentax 35mm camera. The range of operation is very limited.
> At 42mm (in M4/3 format) with my 14-42mm Lumix lens and the 10mm extension tube, the image is ~1" high at minimum focus, ~2 1/4" at maximum focus, at about 6" from the lens---a useful range and a very convenient distance. But there is no overlap with the normal focusing range (down to about an image 3" high at 42mm. That gap may sound insignificant, but when you are photographing things (say, flowers) in the range of 2"-4" high, the gap is very annoying, and can drive you nuts. Trust me. With the 16mm tube, the range (at 42mm) is 3/4" to 1 1/4". The image height would be even smaller with both tubes used together.
> A set of closeup lenses Hoya 46mm Closeup Set HMC Lens Filter would provide a more useful range. Yes, the extra glass surface may slightly reduce image quality, but probably not significantly, particularly if you use a lenshood. Don't "stack" closeup lenses---use only one at a time.
> The extension tubes would be more useful with longer telephoto lenses, say for taking photos of insects from several feet away. With the 10mm extension, I can get an image height down to 2" high with my Lumix 45-150mm at 150mm and the 10mm tube, and down to about 1" high with the 16mm tube. But then you are greatly increasing camera shake (of a type which image stabilization does not help with), requiring the use of a fast shutter, and/or other compromises which reduce image quality. A tripod is almost mandatory.
> For most closeup nature photography (if you can't afford a 45mm $1000 Lumix-Lieca macro lens, or $500 a 60mm macro Zuiko), it is best to use a ~40-60mm lens (in M4/3 format), and the necessary tubes/closeup lenses. However, I find that my Lumix 14-42mm pancake zoom works remarkably well.
>>> I find that it is best to use manual focus for closeup work, because autofocus (on my 14-42mm PZ lens) only works down to about 5" high (w/o the tubes), but manual focus gets down to 3". The effect is less noticeable with extension tubes, but you can focus a little closer in manual.


Polaroid HD Slide Duplicator With Macro Lens Capabilty For The Canon Digital EOS Rebel SL1 (100D), T5i (700D), T4i (650D), T3 (1100D), T3i (600D), T1i (500D), T2i (550D), XSI (450D), XS (1000D), XTI (400D), XT (350D), 1D C, 70D, 60D, 60Da, 50D, 40D, 30D, 20D, 10D, 5D, 1D X, 1D, 5D Mark 2, 5D Mark 3, 7D, 6D, EOS M Digital SLR Cameras
Polaroid HD Slide Duplicator With Macro Lens Capabilty For The Canon Digital EOS Rebel SL1 (100D), T5i (700D), T4i (650D), T3 (1100D), T3i (600D), T1i (500D), T2i (550D), XSI (450D), XS (1000D), XTI (400D), XT (350D), 1D C, 70D, 60D, 60Da, 50D, 40D, 30D, 20D, 10D, 5D, 1D X, 1D, 5D Mark 2, 5D Mark 3, 7D, 6D, EOS M Digital SLR Cameras
Offered by DBROTH
Price: $34.99

4.0 out of 5 stars ADEQUATE, October 14, 2014
DESIGN
> The Polaroid Slide Duplicator is designed to work with an 40-60mm zoom lens (in M4/3 format, = 60-90mm in APS-C format [most DSLRs], =80-120mm in 35mm film format) or equivalent, because there is no way to adjust the distance between the lens and the subject (i.e., the slide you are copying). You can only do so by changing the focal length, which means you must have a zoom lens.
> Ideally, the image will correspond to a 35mm slide at about 50mm (in M4/3 format, =75mm in APS-C format, =100mm in 35mm format).
> That means that it is probably IMPOSSIBLE to make good copies of slides, using the Polaroid Slide Duplicator AS DESIGNED.
>> Zooms are not as sharp as prime lenses. The performance of most zooms adapted to 1:1 photography is miserable.
>> The barrels of many zooms rotate as you focus, which is causes the slide stage to rotate, making the Polaroid Slide Duplicator virtually unusable.
> However, with the right combination of equipment and luck, it is possible to make adequate copies with a zoom lens, very good copies with a prime lens (meaning a non-zoom), and excellent copies with a macro lens.

WHATS INCLUDED
In addition to the slide stage:
> The large bulge on the end of the Polaroid Slide Duplicator tube is a removable 52mm-thread-diameter closeup lens (probably +10 diopter), NOT RECOMMENDED.
> A 52mm rear screw in cap.
> A 52mm-58mm "filter" adapter, which is useful only if your lens takes 58mm "accessories" (i.e., filters, lenshoods, and lenscaps).

WHAT ELSE YOU'LL NEED
> Unless you have a macro lens, to get your lens to focus down to the size of a 35mm slide you'll need extension tubes and/or screw-in closeup lenses, for example HOYA 52mm Close up Filter Set +1,+2, +4 , Close-Up Set For all 52MM Front thread lenses. If your lens has a aperture ring, you can use the cheapest type extension tubes, for example Macro Extension Tube Ring Micro 4/3 M4/3 EP3 GF1 E-PL1 GF2 G1 EPM1 G3 Mount Camera. If your lens does not have an aperture ring, you'll need more expensive "auto" extension tubes. If you are adapting an old camera lens with a different mount than your camera, you can use the extension tubes for that system.
> If you use a lens with a different mount (such a 50mm f2 lens from an old film camera, or a macro lens with a different mount), you'll need a mount adapter. If your lens has a aperture ring, you can use the cheapest type adapters, for example: PK-M4/3 Lens Mount Adapter Ring Pentax PK Lens to MICRO 4/3 Body E-PM2 EM5 EPL5 GF5 GF3. If your lens does not have an aperture ring, you'll need a more expensive adapter, for example: Fotodiox 10-New -PK-M43 Lens Mount Adapter with Aperture Dial, Digital Pentax AF Lens to MFT Micro 4/3 System Camera Mount Adapter.
> Unless the filter thread of your lens is 52mm, you'll need a "step-up" "filter" adapter corresponding to the filter thread of your lens. For example: if your lens takes 49mm "accessories", then you need a 49-52mm step-up adapter; if your lens takes 55mm "accessories", then you need a 55-52mm step-down adapter.
> If you use a prime lens (i.e., a non-zoom), you may need extension rings (do not confuse with extension tubes), to adjust the distance between the lens and the subject (i.e., the slide you are copying), which is essential in order to focus on your slide.
>> Cheap non-auto extension tube sets, for example [ASIN:B00C2P3JPE Macro Extension Tube Ring Micro 4/3 M4/3 EP3 GF1 E-PL1 GF2 G1 EPM1 G3 Mount Camera]] consists of three 52mm extension rings in 7, 14, and 28mm lengths, and male/female mount adapters. The adapters screwed together make a short extension tube (which may fill your need for an extension tube), which can be expanded with the rings, but you can also use the rings between your lens and the Slide Duplicator. The extension rings can also be purchased separately: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Ring / Spacer 7mm long: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Tube / 14mm long: Photo Plus 52mm Diameter Extension Tube / 28mm long.
>> 52mm diameter filters with the glass removed, make excellent, cheaper, and better ~5mm-lenth extension rings--because the smaller increments give you more options. There is a tool for taking out the glass: 52mm 52 Lens Repair Silicone Rubber Tool / Filter Wrench Remove Front Retaining Ring Scratch Free!. If you don't have old filters, you can buy 5 for $11 XCSOURCE® 52mm Color Filter Blue Yellow Orange Red Green + Lens Cap + 6 slot Case for Nikon D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D3200 D3100 D3000 D90 D4 D3X D800 D700 D600 D300S D300 D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D5000 D3200 D3100 D3000 D90 D80 D70 D60 D50 D40 LF68

USE WITH A ZOOM LENS
> It is essential that the barrel of your zoom does not rotate when you zoom or focus.
> If you have a choice of zoom lenses, short (but covering the 40-60mm range (in M4/3 format, = 60-90mm in APS-C format, =80-120 in 35mm format) is better than long, and a narrow range is probably better than a wide range. E.g. 25-75mm is better than 14-100mm.

EXAMPLE 1: My 14-42mm Lumix PZ (pancake zoom lens) does not revolve, and therefore is potentially adequate, albeit a little short at maximum zoom. With a 10mmm extension tube, a 37-52mm "filter" adapter, and my lens at 42mm (=84mm in 35mm format), I can fill about 80% of the camera frame (with the image of a 35mm slide in focus). At f11, the center is sharp but the edges of the frame are very "soft". Note that the "kit" 14-42mm lens is a different lens, and may or may work better or worse. A slightly longer zoom would be better, but the quality of the image would probably be as poor or worse.

USE WITH A "PRIME LENS" (meaning a non-zoom)
> Prime lenses produce far superior results when adapted for closeup work than zooms--but the results would not be as good as a macro-lens.
> You can use a prime meant for your system (50mm for M4/3 format camera, or 75mm for APS-C format cameras), but those focal lengths are not common, and you should not buy such a lens for this purpose.
> As long as the lens elements are clear (no fungus or haze) and you can manually adjust the aperture, an old 50mm lens from an old 35mm film camera with a cheap non-auto adapter would probably work well on a M4/3 format camera. For this purpose, (all other things being equal) slower lenses are probably better for this purpose than faster lenses, i.e., an f2.8 is probably better than an f1.2.
> With your camera adjusted so that the image of your slide approximately fills your camera frame with the image in focus:
>>> If more than the slide image fills your camera frame (part of the paper holder is in your camera frame), you can crop the image later using graphics software (not included), although you'll be loosing pixels (resolution).
>>> If not all of he slide image fits into your camera frame, you can add extension rings until it does.

USE WITH A MACRO LENS
> A good macro-lens is the only way to make good quality copies of slides. For example: a Panasonic Leica DG Macro-Elmarit 45mm/F2.8 (=90mm in 35mm format) macro lens, would probably work well.

EXAMPLE 2: With a Pentax K to M4/3 adapter (see above), a 50mm f4 Pentax Macro lens (= 100mm in M4/3 format), a 49-52mm "filter" adapter, and about 20mm of additional 52mm diameter extension rings, the camera image is almost exactly filled and in focus (with the image of a 35mm slide. It looks like this will be an ideal setup, when I acquire the exact set of extension rings. A screw-in Pentax 50mm macro (or a macro of a different brand) would be just as good, with the appropriate adapter.
> With Lumix cameras it is necessary to set the camera to operate "without a lens": Menu > Custom settings ("C" with a wrench) > Shoot w/o lens > on.
> With Lumix cameras (and others if you have this option), set the aspect ratio to 2:3, which corresponds to the shape of 35mm slide images.

OPERATION OF THE POLAROID SLIDE DUPLICATOR
> The slide stage rotates 360 degrees, and can be locked in place.
> The slide stage slides up and down, and even completely off, but doesn't hold in place well.
>>> You can probably add thin strips of tape (such as Blue Painter's tape which is easy removable) to increase the friction.
> The slide-holder slides from side-to-side.
> With these three movements you can crop parts of a slide, etc.
> However, with all these movements, simply copying a whole slide is far more difficult than it should be. You have to orient each slide, one at a time. I'd be tempted to tape the stage in place (with double-sided foamy tape), because I don't want to crop slides, or mess with fancy effects---I just want to copy them. Besides, using a macro-lens (instead of a zoom), I don't have the option to crop anyway.
> Rather than the included closeup lens (NOT recommended), you can get better results with extension tubes and/or weaker closeup lens. I suggest a set of screw-in closeup lenses (+1, +2, and +3 or +4 diopter. Use the weakest closeup lens which works with your lens. For best results, use one closeup lens at a time--do not stack them.
> Set your lens at f11 or f16. Keep the camera and adapter still (best on a tripod with a remote shutter cable).
> The white diffuser is protected with clear plastic which you need to peel off, but after doing so, protect the diffuser from scratches etc.
> Do not aim a light source at the slide copier (that will accentuate dust and flaws in the diffuser). Instead illuminate a square of white cardboard, and aim the slide copier at the cardboard. A halogen desk lamp would be ideal.

COMMENT ON EQUIVALENT FOCAL LENGTHS
> It is easy to get confused. The focal length is always the same. A 50mm lens (for example) is a 50mm lens regardless of the format of the camera. What can be different is the size of the sensor in your camera. The sensor in an 4/3 format camera is ½ the size of 35mm format. The sensor in an APS-C camera is ¾ the size of 35mm format. I include 35mm "equivalents", because that is the standard you can use to compare other formats.

OTHER OPTIONS
> The Opteka HD2 slide duplicators appear have all of the same problems and limitations, with one exception:
>> The slide stage of the Opteka apparently does not move around (a good thing).
>> The diffuser of the Opteka is closer to the slide, increasing the probablilty that defects, dust, etc on the diffuser will be in focus and appear on the image.
> Thus, it is a toss-up.


Irwin Tools 1402L3 6LN Original Long Nose Locking Pliers, 6-Inch
Irwin Tools 1402L3 6LN Original Long Nose Locking Pliers, 6-Inch
Price: $11.39
53 used & new from $8.99

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, October 12, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
CONSTRUCTION
> Smaller, and lighter construction than a 9" Irwin Vice-Grip pliers. Irwin 15-9LN Vise Grip 2-7/8-Inch Jaw Capacity 9-Inch Long Nose Plier with Wire Cutter
> Much better built (even though "made in China") than the cheaper copies. Most specifically the jaws are hard steel and stay sharp. The teeth of copies flatten under strain and do not hold as well
>>> The action is smoother than that of cheaper copies but even so, can be enhanced by working automotive grease into all the moving parts.
> These are small tools which puts them into a "moderate duty" category---a guy with normal strength can damage them. Not easily, but they can be overstressed.

GREAT WEED PULLERS
> Irwin Long-Nose Locking Pliers are terrific for pulling up small saplings, 1/8" to 1/4" diameter (maybe a little larger in soft soil). The strength you'd normally have to put into griping the sapling can be put into pulling. So you can easily pull larger saplings than you could by hand.
> Arguably, the larger model is easier to grip for this purpose (gripping and pulling), but is considerably heavier. The 6" model can comfortably be carried in a pants pocket.
> Blue painter's masking tape can improve the grip, and can be easily removed and replaced. ScotchBlue Painter's Tape, Multi-Use, .94-Inch by 60-Yard
> The design of the Long-Nose jaws means that you don't constantly have to adjust the adjustment screw. Once properly adjusted, just grip the smaller saplings (~1/8") by the tip, thicker by the middle, and thickest (~1/4") by the inside teeth. Note that the Long-Nose jaw models are much better for this purpose than the "curved" or "straight" jaw models.
> You can pull weeds other than tree saplings (such as vines with long taproots) if there is a stem you can grab.
> When pulling weeds, grip with the pliers nearly vertical, so that the teeth grip across the stem.
> You can unscrew the adjustment screw all the way, pass it through a length of chain, and reinstall it. With an inch or so of chain you can attach a small carabineer and hang it from a belt loop. Or you can attach a longer chain, say to a wreaking bar for more leverage in pulling weeds Stanley 55-526 21-Inch Wonder Bar X21 Pry Bar

OTHER USES
> Great hook removers for fishermen (keep them soaked in WD-40 to prevent rusting).
> Not quite "needle-nose" pliers, but handy in many application when working with electrical wire, or other wire. Includes a wire cutter, which works well for moderately thick soft wire.

ALTERNATIVE
> Triplett Longlocker pliers are just a tad lower quality, but are stretched out to 15", which means you don't have to bend down to pull weeds Triplett TT-200 LONGLOCKERS Carbon Steel 15" Extended Reach Locking Pliers with Cushioned Grips, 1-13/16" Width, 11/16" Height


Solidtools Forged Adze Hoe
Solidtools Forged Adze Hoe
Offered by Forgecraft USA
Price: $21.85

5.0 out of 5 stars DOES THE JOB, October 11, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Solidtools Forged Adze Hoe
DESCRIPTION
> Assembles in seconds.
> Light, tough, nearly indestructible.

AS A HOE
> A terrific hoe for cutting down small brush, weeds, etc just below the soil level. For this sort of work, far superior to a traditional hoe.
> Much lighter and less tiring to use than a grubbing-hoe (mattock with an axe-head).
> Used one-handed compared to a mattock which requires two hands.
> Relatively light, well balanced, but sufficient weigh to have impact and chop through roots and stems.
> Not obvious in the photo is that the blade is bent significantly upward, at just the right radius to cut parallel the ground.
> Unlike a traditional mattock, you have to get down to the ground (bent over, or on your knees), but you have much better control, and your other hand is free for other tasks.

AS AN ADZE
> As I understand the description, this tool is intended to be a hoe in an adze-like design---but (with sharpening) it makes a great adze (sorta a sideways axe) for woodworking, according to other reviewers. Compared to other adzes I've seen, this is on the big side, but probably great for roughing things out.


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