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Black Friday (Soul Survivor Series)
Black Friday (Soul Survivor Series)
by Tim LaHaye
Edition: Paperback
59 used & new from $0.01

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Action, adventure, issues for teens, March 13, 2003
Black Friday is the fourth title in the W Publishing Group's Soul Survivor series by Tim LaHaye and Bob DeMoss. LeHaye is best known as co-author of the Left Behind series. DeMoss is a pop culture specialist.
The series belongs on the reading list of every parent, church youth worker, pastor, teacher and teenager.
Jodi and Stan are high school friends in this new teen novel. Jodi has a summer internship with the local paper, and Stan has had a recent, very personal connection to abortion. The plot creates a context in which questions arise for the young heroes as well as for the reader.
Seeking answers, Jodi and Stan go "undercover" to investigate a local clinic, where they discover unsafe, dishonest and sometimes illegal practices. There's probably not a teenager in the U.S. today who doesn't have at least one friend or acquaintance who has had an abortion.
LaHaye and DeMoss hand teenagers the truth in a format they can enjoy; and they offer adults a great tool to use with their teens.


Protecting Your Child in an X-rated World (Focus on the Family)
Protecting Your Child in an X-rated World (Focus on the Family)
by Frank York
Edition: Paperback
90 used & new from $0.01

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be Required Reading for Parents, July 16, 2002
A better parental handbook will be hard to find. The authors have drawn from their own life experiences and decades of professional involvement to produce a volume that should be required reading for every parent.

Protecting Your Child sounds the alarm on an issue that should be alarming to every parent. The authors point out that there has been a 500% increase in rape over the 19-year period from 1980 to 1999, the decades during which the U. S. porn industry grew from a $4 billion annual business to a $10 billion dollar business. Worldwide, it is estimated that pornographers profit $56 billion a year.
York and LaRue document countless law enforcement records that tie pornography to sex offenses. Other disturbing statistics add to the cause for concern. For example, the authors write, "A report in the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1993 noted that nearly half of the nation's child molesters were children. In addition, in 1983 there were only 22 juvenile sex offender programs nationwide; in 1993 that number had grown to 755. Today there are more than 1,200."
Readers should not overwhelmed by the barrage of statistics and tragic stories told in the opening pages. LaRue and York always provide an antidote including concrete steps for action.
Both authors are honest and straightforward in sharing how they were themselves victims of pornography at a young age.
"I am fighting pornography for the sake of our nation's children who are becoming the primary consumers of pornography," says LaRue. The book documents how children are, indeed, being exposed to hard-core pornography at younger and younger ages.
York was first exposed to pornography as an 11-year-old in 1955 when a local drugstore began carrying the brand new Playboy magazine. "Pornography was not widely accessible in those days," he says, "or I might have become a seriously addicted child." Today York is editorial director of Traditional Values Coalition.
In Part 1, York and LaRue detail why pornography is a danger to families, then take a look at its pervasiveness. They illustrate how it has infiltrated even our homes, public schools and libraries largely via the Internet.
Part 2 gives practical responses for the challenge to stop pornography from destroying our children and communities. The chapters on how to keep it out of your home, and how to help the child who has already been exposed to porn are invaluable resources for parents.
Protecting Your Child may paint a scary picture of the present, but it also offers a vision of hope for the future.


A Place Called Wiregrass
A Place Called Wiregrass
by Michael Morris
Edition: Paperback
142 used & new from $0.01

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Debut novel hits home run, May 20, 2002
In this remarkable first novel, Michael Morris gives us a masterful work of Southern fiction with characters we will all recognize. Erma Lee and other women in the story are being made stronger through the havoc rained on their lives by villainous and vile men who serve only their base libidos.
Gerald and Erma Lee's pastor, however, epitomize the strength of men who depend on their faith -- not their libido --to guide their lives. In contrast to Erma Lee, Gerald and other honest characters, there is a parade of snobbish women and a pastor who illustrate much of what gives the Christian faith a bad name.
Erma Lee's fight for a better life for herself and Cher, her teenage granddaughter, is inspiring. Her search for faith is a realistic journey -- not sugar-coated or trivialized, but colored by explosive confrontations with her worthless, estranged husband and Cher. The crises that drive the novels' conflict give the reader a totally satisfyling reading experience.


Deceived [VHS]
Deceived [VHS]
VHS
Offered by pcas344
Price: $1.95
22 used & new from $0.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sci-fi thriller explores greed, faith, April 26, 2002
This review is from: Deceived [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Is there intelligent life on other planets? That's the sci-fi theme of Deceived, latest project from Cloud Ten Pictures. ''Intense'' is the word to describe Deceived. Political intrigue, personal greed and authentic faith are stirred together in explosive proportions when principal players are trapped in a space observatory. The human relationships and conflicts are as explosive as the plot's circumstances. Billionaire Emmett Shaw (played by Stewart Bick) claims personal ownership of a signal he believes is coming from extraterrestrial life. He assembles an unlikely crew including computer guru Jack Jones (Judd Nelson), an investigative reporter, and a arrogant radio preacher who is also Shaw's spiritual mentor. Shaw's party travels to the Sierra Nevadas observatory (funded largely by Shaw) with plans to break history's biggest story ever. Upon arrival, they discover that their on-site technicians are missing and the project has been sabotaged. After Col. David Garrett (Lou Gossett, Jr.) arrives from the Pentagon, a violent storm traps the group in the observatory, and a test of wills ensues because both Garrett and Shaw are accustomed to being in charge. The dilemma addressed in Deceived reveals how human nature may lead to compromise and rationalization in order to achieve selfish ends. With the gripping story of Deceived, Cloud Ten Pictures continues to advance the company's reputation for excellent drama presented in the context of a moral worldview. This one gives movie buffs reason to look forward to more work from Cloud Ten.


The Fourth Frontier Exploring The New World Of Work
The Fourth Frontier Exploring The New World Of Work
by Stephen R. Graves
Edition: Hardcover
119 used & new from $0.01

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Personal Integrity in the Workplace, January 30, 2002
"How did we ever get to the place where we thought that to be good Christians, we had to quit our jobs and become full-time `ministers,' sail for foreign shores to serve as a missionary, or run a homeless shelter?" ask The Fourth Frontier authors Stephen R. Graves and Thomas G. Addington. "All those assignments are good," they continue. "But those jobs have no higher value than any other assignment God gives to his people."
Graves and Addington, co-founders of the Cornerstone Group, authored The Fourth Frontier: Exploring the New Role of Work as a road map to help us navigate a landscape of fragmented lives, and to find a focus on our destination.
According to the authors, we try to separate our lives into compartments and not worry what one has to do with another. Subsequently, we live very unbalanced lives. They call work the fourth frontier, and insist that biblical truth calls for us to integrate it with the first three frontiers -- family, government and church.
"As we grow more prosperous from our work," they write, "we are growing more alienated from our friends, our families and our God." We use church as a place of retreat, a safe place to withdraw from the world. We want to break life into segments we think we can handle one at a time -- family, work, church, leisure, volunteerism, school, community.
"In addition to the worlds of family, government and church, God has created this fourth frontier," they say. And Jesus is the "whole-life solution to the problem of fragmentation ... the antidote to the fragmented life."
They lament that work is usually considered a negative thing, and they rebut that fallacy with the thesis of The Fourth Frontier: "God has ordained work. It was his idea." The volume cites sound biblical principles to support that thesis, pointing out that more than half of Jesus' parables incorporate a theology of work for his followers.
Graves and Addington dismiss the claim of some who say man didn't have to work until after Adam's fall. It's simple. They quote Genesis 2:15: "The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it." Because God's original plan called for man to work, the authors believe we'll work in heaven. Finally, they point out that the Word never refers to a time at which one should quit work -- i.e., retire.
To help us integrate work, faith and all of life, The Fourth Frontier offers several practical strategies. First, the authors suggest we check our attitude toward work. To help do that, they offer a series of questions including: Do you feel passionate about your work? Is your work significant for God's Kingdom?
They also spend some ink debunking four common myths about work: (1) Work is a four-letter word, (2) Work is enemy territory, (3) Work is our "salvation," and (4) Work is our last priority.
Addington and Graves believe that work, the marketplace, is currently the "greatest opportunity for kingdom influence the world has ever known." And, they say that as we discover this fourth frontier, we should find a rhythm of family, church, government and work.
They contend further that believers should reflect God on the job by -- among other things -- displaying purity, building strong relationships, focusing on the task at hand, showing mercy and compassion, providing servant leadership, demonstrating balance, offering forgiveness and setting correct priorities.
The meat of the volume uses six of its eleven chapters to explore fourth frontier "realities" that are key to having a full and balanced life: devotion, calling, integrity, stewardship, rest and influence. The concluding chapter returns to scriptural foundations, and the authors declare without apology, "New believers are the only people with a legitimate reason to say, `I don't know the Bible very well.' " Know the Book and live the Book, they conclude. They are persuaded that people have never been more receptive to the influence of believers on behalf of God's kingdom.
The Cornerstone Group, founded in 1991, is based in Fayetteville, Arkansas, and specializes in change management and strategy to both non-profit and for-profit organizations around the world. Graves, with an earned doctorate from Dallas Theological Seminary, is known as a no-nonsense businessman and a solid theologian.
Addington, an expert in organizational analysis, strategic planning and communication strategies, holds his doctorate in communication from Penn State University. He spent several years as a professor at the University of Alabama-Huntsville and the University of Arkansas.
Graves and Addington are also principals in The Life@Work Company, a non-profit group which publishes the bimonthly Life@Work Journal and other professional materials dedicated to helping men and women blend biblical wisdom with marketplace excellence.


The Missions Addiction
The Missions Addiction
by David Shibley
Edition: Paperback
51 used & new from $0.01

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When Addiction is a Good Thing, January 30, 2002
This review is from: The Missions Addiction (Paperback)
"The purpose of the church is to bring God glory through the worldwide proclamation, reception and worship of His Son," says David Shibley. "That is our corporate purpose. It should be our individual purpose as well." With that premise as foundation, Shibley's The Missions Addiction (Charisma House, 2001) is a masterful analysis of the church and missions in today's global culture. The church should take note of Shibley's latest title because he speaks from experience. He has personally ministered in 51 nations and is founder and president of Global Advance, a ministry that provides training and resources for thousands of pastors in 50 nations.
"I am personally convinced," he writes, "that there were dramatic advances for the gospel worldwide in the 1990s and that those previous ten years were a mere prelude to what God will do in this decade." For example, he cites the fact that, at the end of the year 2000, the JESUS film had been seen by more than four billion people, with almost 129 million people registering decisions for Christ.
Other predictions are more sobering: increased conflict for the church, more militant religions (especially Islam), and a more exacting standard for Christian leadership.
He sees American isolationism as a critical concern for spreading the Gospel. "The possible merits of protectionism juxtaposed against globalization may be argued in politics," he acknowledges, "but a protectionist mentality in the church is always suicidal. There are no merits to `spiritual protectionism'; it is always lethal. The most patriotic thing I can do for America is love the world."
Again and again he challenges, both by offering hope and encouragement, and by articulating obstacles to overcome. He says teens in missions are at once a cause for great hope and great concern. More American teenagers went on missions trips last summer than ever before, but Shibley says, "[W]hile Gen-Xers and millennials are spiritually hungry, they are also often biblically illiterate and tend to value relevancy over truth."
Shibley's passion for missions is contagious, his heart for missionaries transparent. He narrates countless stories of martyrs and others who have sacrificed all to follow Christ to the mission field -- often in the missionaries' own moving words. For example, he shares the story of a couple who stayed in Afghanistan when all other foreigners were evacuated: "The evacuation convoy came and left without us. Our neighbors were puzzled. Later we heard them call us no longer `the foreigners,' but `the people who stayed.' "During our first Christmas, ...over 50 women and their children all squeezed into our home, a little living room, to hear the advent story. Some wept... Others ran to their husbands and told them to go to the house of `the people who stayed' and hear the Good News."
Recurring themes include the need for unity in the Body, and the necessity of adherence to Scripture. The Missions Addiction is a valuable reference book, meticulously documented with hundreds of notes and index entries; it is a history, citing the thoughts of centuries of missions greats; and it is a call to action, challenging believers to tell the Good News.


Seeking God's Hidden Face: When God Seems Absent
Seeking God's Hidden Face: When God Seems Absent
by Cecil B. Murphey
Edition: Hardcover
51 used & new from $0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Playing Hide and Seek With God, August 8, 2001
We may call it a dark valley, a loss of God's presence or just a tough time. Whatever we call it, we've all been there. Cecil Murphey -- theologian, former missionary and former pastor -- tackles the issue in Seeking God's Hidden Face.
Unlike many spiritual self-help titles -- fortunately -- Murphey's book doesn't try to reduce the search to an artificial one-two-three formula or shape the complex subject into the confines of a catchy, memorable phrase. No one key concept here, no six simple steps, but Murphey packs meat into every one of the 21 short chapters, covering many principles needful for healthy Christian life and growth.
He confesses his dark times have not necessarily been preceded by great tragedy or crisis. They just happen. Many of the frustrations he expresses may make readers think he's been reading their minds. For example, at one point he writes, "I wanted to know the truth about myself, but I didn't want it to hurt."
In a chapter titled "Old Wounds" he writes of being a pastor: "At various times members of the church had coldly rejected me. The worst was a man who screamed, `You're the worst pastor I've ever known, and if anyone doesn't belong in a leadership role, it's you!' " He says those kinds of wounds stay with us for years, and we may have to revisit them to heal from them. He calls it the "I have to feel them to heal them" principle.
Life's valleys may not be easy, but the author reminds us of this truth: "It's only in hindsight that we truly value the difficult times we've gone through."


Seeking God's Hidden Face: When God Seems Absent
Seeking God's Hidden Face: When God Seems Absent
by Cecil B. Murphey
Edition: Hardcover
51 used & new from $0.01

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Playing Hide-and-Seek With God, August 6, 2001
We may call it a dark valley, a loss of God's presence, a dry spell, or a tough time. Whatever we call it, we've all been there, some of us many times. Cecil Murphey - writer, theologian, former missionary and former pastor - tackles the issue in Seeking God's Hidden Face.
Unlike many spiritual self-help titles, Murphey's book doesn't try to reduce the search to an artificial one-two-three formula or shape the complex subject into the confines of a catchy, memorable phrase. It's not always a comfortable read, but Murphey packs meat into every one of the 21 short chapters, covering many principles needful for healthy Christian life and growth.
The author says the book was prompted by dark times in his own life. "I call it God's hidden face," he says, "a term that appears [in scripture] a number of times, especially in Psalms." Again and again, he points the reader to Psalms because there he found comfort and encouragement. Murphey says his dark times have not necessarily been preceded by great tragedy or crisis. They just happen.
From chapter to chapter, he is transparent about his own experience, and like the biblical psalmists, his transparency touches his readers. In fact, many of the frustrations he expresses will make readers think Murphey's been reading their minds. For example, at one point he writes, "I wanted to know the truth about myself, but I didn't want it to hurt."
Selected gems gleaned from other chapters include: "Afflictive Providences" - "Briefly, providence is God's working with his people to fulfill the divine purpose in their lives. If we focus on the idea of God's providing, we stay close to the meaning." He cites Joseph sold into slavery and the longsuffering Job as examples of godly men who endured afflictive providences.
"Old Wounds" - He writes of being a pastor: "At various times members of the church had coldly rejected me. The worst was a man who screamed, `You're the worst pastor I've ever known, and if anyone doesn't belong in a leadership role, it's you!'" He says those kinds of wounds stay with us for years, and we may have to revisit them to heal from them. He calls it the "I have to feel them to heal them" principle.
"Unhealed Places" - In this chapter he addresses how difficult it was for him to begin praying this simple prayer: "Heal the parts of me that don't want to be healed." But, he says, it is a necessary step if we are to find God's face.
The valleys are not easy, but Murphey reminds readers of one more truth: "It's only in hindsight that we truly value the difficult times we've gone through." Seeking God's Hidden Face will bring insight and light to the seeking reader.


Lord Foulgrin's Letters
Lord Foulgrin's Letters
by Randy Alcorn
Edition: Paperback
140 used & new from $0.01

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Look in the Mirror, July 19, 2001
Author Randy Alcorn holds up the mirror for the church in this novel of spiritual warfare. Like C. S. Lewis's demon Screwtape, Lord Foulgrin writes a series of letters to his assistant as he mentors the lesser demons in how to prevent people from embracing the Christian faith. The book is noteworthy both for its creativity and its subtle convicting power. Again and again, Foulgrin's letters pierce the facade of our culture's comfortable Christianity, hitting every moral issue of our time. For example, on moral responsibility, Foulgrin writes, 'What they most fear and despise is moral accountability. They'll gradly embrace any theory removing this built-in sense they must answer for how they've lived.' It's a riveting read, with redemptive value.


The Soulbane Stratagem
The Soulbane Stratagem
by Norman Jetmundsen
Edition: Hardcover
53 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Letter From the Devil, July 13, 2001
This review is from: The Soulbane Stratagem (Hardcover)
Norman Jetmundsen's Soulbane Stratagem is a gripping story on several levels. Protagonist Cade Bryson, an American student in Oxford, is searching for meaning, love and faith. When he discovers a packet of diabolical letters between the demon Soulbane and his superior Foulheart (yes, a la C. S. Lewis), he pursues all three with abandon. Fast action, deep emotion and moral victory highlight this first novel. I look forward to more from Jetmundsen, a practicing attorney. Finally -- a lawyer who doesn't try to copy Grisham!


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