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NLee the Engineer RSS Feed (Nashua, NH)
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EBL 1100mAh Super Capacity AAA Rechargeable Batteries, 4 Pack
EBL 1100mAh Super Capacity AAA Rechargeable Batteries, 4 Pack
Offered by EBL official
Price: $7.99
2 used & new from $7.99

3.0 out of 5 stars High-Capacity regular NiMH batteries (NOT Low-Self-Discharge type), May 24, 2016
I purchased a set of those EBL Super Capacity 1100mAh AAA rechargeable batteries, together with the EBL 2800mAh AA version, more than a year ago. Prior to that, the highest capacity low-self-discharge NiMH batteries I have tested were rated 950mAh for AAA, 2550mAh for AA. So I was eager to see how well those EBL batteries perform.

[Capacity Testing]
My initial testing of those EBL batteries, using the La Crosse BC1000 Battery Charger, looked very promising:
- Right out of the box, the four AAA cells showed 485mAh average remaining capacity.
- After one cycle, the average jumped to 1039mAh.
- After another two more cycles, the average capacity stopped at 1043mAh, or 95% of the rated '1100mAh'. The spread is also very small, between 1031 and 1050mAh.

For comparison, the eneloop XX AAA cells gave an average capacity of 968mAh in the same setup. This is slightly higher than its advertised rating of 950mAh.

[Self-Discharge Rate]
Those EBL batteries all have ‘low self-discharge’ printed on them. The actual long term self-discharge rate of those batteries, however, is disappointing. I measured the remaining charge for two sets of EBL batteries (4x AA and 4x AAA) after 100 days of storage. Here is what I observed:

- The four AA cells showed remaining charge from 1800 to 2090mAh. This corresponds to 64-75% of the rated capacities.

- The four AAA cells were even worse. One cell was completely dead (0mAh). The other three range from 695 to 848mAh, or 63-77% of rated capacity.

The EBL product page claims "Low self-discharge batteries will remain 85% juice when you leaving it for no use 1 year", similar to that of Sanyo eneloop Pre-Charged Rechargeable Batteries. This claim proves to be completely bogus in just 3 months. The self-discharge rates of those EBL batteries are close to that of ordinary NiMH batteries (or even worse in the case of AAA cells). They should never be advertized as 'Pre-Charged' or 'Low-Self-Discharge'.

Similarly, I cannot trust the cycle-life claim for those EBL batteries. The product pages where I previously ordered my EBL batteries says '1500 Cycles', while this product description now says "can be recharged up to 1200 times". It sounds like EBL marketing people simply pulled those numbers out of their you-know-where.

[Bottom Line]
If you just need some ordinary NiMH batteries for daily use, then those EBL batteries are still worth considering. But don’t buy them thinking that they are actually ‘Low Self-Discharge’ type. Personally, I cannot recommend those EBL rechargeable batteries since I despise false advertisement.


Best Fit For U 14500Charger with Two Rechargable Rechargable Li-Ion Batteries
Best Fit For U 14500Charger with Two Rechargable Rechargable Li-Ion Batteries
Offered by Best Fit For U
Price: $8.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Actual measured battery capacity much lower than advertised, May 21, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I received this Charger with two UltraFire 14500 Li-Ion Batteries as part of a previous purchase (MECO Mini CREE Led Flashlight Torch Zoom Light Charger 14500 Battery). This review focuses on the charger and batteries only.

[Battery Charger]
The unbranded charger accepts 100-240V universal AC voltage. It has a single LED indicator: Red when charging, Green when done. A faint ringing sound can be heard whenever the charger is plugged in.

In standby mode, the charger consumes 0.3 watt according to my EUM-A1 Power Usage Meter. When charging either one or two 14500 cells, the charger consumes 2.7W. This suggests the charging current is around 500-600mA total, shared between two cells. On the charger it says: "Output: DC 4.2V 600mAh" which is the wrong unit ('mAh' is the unit for capacity, not current).

[Batteries]
The two 14500 Li-ion batteries I received are labeled 'UltraFire 1200mAh'. I connected a 5-ohm power resistor as load, and monitored the battery’s output current and voltage over time. I expect each battery to provide around 700mA for at least 1.5 hours. Instead, they both dropped dead after approximately 30 minute. Something is very wrong.

I repeated my test after recharging those two batteries overnight. But the outcome is still the same. See the “Output Current vs. Time” chart I uploaded to customer images section. The batteries’ actual measured capacities are 310 and 420mAh, respectively. That means they can only deliver 1/4 to 1/3 of their advertised capacity. The large discrepancy between those two batteries is also an indication on poor quality control.

Previously I have tested some Ultrafire 3500mAh 1.2V NiMH AA Rechargeable Batteries. Their average measured capacity is only around 500mAh, or 1/7 of advertised value.

[Bottom Line]
All the UltraFire rechargeable batteries I have tested (AA, AAA, 14500) deliver only a fraction of their rated capacities. This manufacturer is simply using false advertisement to prey on unsuspecting customers. Don’t waste your money on this or any other UltraFire products.
Comment Comment | Permalink


Car Mount, Mengo Magna-Snap Mini Magnetic Air Vent Car Mount for Smartphones (iPhone, Samsung, HTC, LG, Nokia, & More), Mp3 Players, and GPS Devices - Retail Packaging
Car Mount, Mengo Magna-Snap Mini Magnetic Air Vent Car Mount for Smartphones (iPhone, Samsung, HTC, LG, Nokia, & More), Mp3 Players, and GPS Devices - Retail Packaging
Offered by Mengo Products
Price: $11.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Works great - after some initial glitches were resolved, May 17, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm looking for a phone holder to use my Samsung Galaxy S5 in the car as a GPS navigator. I already have a flip-case (Samsung Galaxy S5 Case S View Flip Cover) on my phone, so most 'cradle' type of car mounts cannot be used. That's why I decided to try this Mengo Snap Mini Air Vent Car Mount.

The car mount comes with a magnetic base and two iron plates (see my uploaded pictures for size comparison with my phone). According to the instruction sheet, you are supposed to either place the larger rectangular plate INSIDE the back cover of your phone, or stick the smaller circular plate on the OUTSIDE of the phone. The problem is, the larger rectangular plate does not fit inside my Samsung Galaxy S5. So I stick the smaller plate on the INSIDE of the case instead.

Why inside and not outside? The magnet is a little too powerful. When the iron plate is mounted outside of the phone, it requires quite a bit of effort to pull the phone apart from the magnet. With the iron plate placed inside the case, the magnetic force is significantly reduced, but still strong enough to hold the phone in place during bumpy rides. Placing the plate inside also means I never have to worry about the adhesive back falling off after some time.

Another problem I found: Initially the magnetic base comes off every time I try to remove the phone from the car mount. Part of the reason is the magnet is too powerful, and there is not enough friction between the car mount and the air vent. Eventually I learned that I should tilt the phone first, before pulling it off. That way the magnetic base will not come off with the phone.

[Bottom Line]
Overall this is a reasonably good product with some initial glitches. It works well once I figured out the proper way to use it.

[Other Remarks]
- The car mount can also be used as a stand to hold my phone in landscape viewing angle. See my uploaded picture.

- The reception of my phone is not affected by the added iron plate on its back. However if you have a wireless charging station, it will not function with an extra metal plate inserted between the phone and charger.
Comment Comment | Permalink


Philips 453340 3 Way Bulb LED Light Bulb 5W/9W/20W (40W/60W/100W) Soft White, (2 pack)
Philips 453340 3 Way Bulb LED Light Bulb 5W/9W/20W (40W/60W/100W) Soft White, (2 pack)
Offered by 3 stooges
Price: $52.99
3 used & new from $44.16

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Actually much brighter than my old 100 Watt incandescent 3-way bulb, May 15, 2016
I purchased this Philips 453340 3 Way LED Light Bulb from my local HarDware store, to replace old 3-way incandescent bulb in my floor lamp. One nice surprise is that, it is actually much brighter than the incandescent bulb at the highest power setting.

[Light Output]
- The old incandescent bulb is rated 30/70/100W, with light output of 300/940/1240 lumens.
- The new LED bulb is rated 5/9/20W, with light output of 470/840/1620 lumens.

Notice that at the highest power level, the LED bulb give out 30% more light, although it is advertised as '100W-equivalent'. This is because a standard (non 3-way) 100W incandescent bulb is rated for ~1600 lumens.

[Power Consumption]
According to my EUM-A1 Power Usage Meter:
- Initially the bulb consumes 5.4 / 9.5 / 20.2W, consistent with the advertised 5/9/20W power.
- After running for 30 minutes: 5.8 / 9.8 / 20W

This shows the heat sink and thermal design is very adequate, unlike most low-cost LED bulbs flooding the market recently. As an example: the power consumption of TCP 10W Dimmable LED A19 bulb drops by 17% when it warms up.

Power factor is consistently high at PF=0.98, which is a sign of good electrical design.

[Conclusion]
The Philips 3-way bulb works exactly as advertised, and it has excellent thermal design (unlike some of the recent low-cost bulbs I tested). I wish the price could be a bit lower. But since this is the only 3-way LED bulb I can find under 20 USD, I consider it a great value.

[Additional Remarks]
- The size of this LED bulb is A21, which is slightly larger than the more common A19 60W-equivalent bulbs. This is the same size as most incandescent 3-way bulbs, so there should not be any problems.

- The difference between a normal bulb and a 3-way bulb is that, the latter has an extra conductor ring around the center terminal. In order for the 3-way bulb to work correctly, both terminals must be in contact with the light fixture. This can be tricky if your 3-way light fixture is too old.

- You can install this 3-way bulb to a normal light fixture. But then it only works in the middle power setting as a 60W-equivalent bulb. So this would be big waste of money.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 17, 2016 9:18 PM PDT


MECO Mini CREE Led Flashlight Torch Zoom Light Charger 14500 Battery
MECO Mini CREE Led Flashlight Torch Zoom Light Charger 14500 Battery
Offered by SaturnMarket
Price: $9.99
12 used & new from $1.00

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor quality LED flashlight / Low capacity rechargeable batteries, May 11, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The product I ordered (MECO Mini CREE Led Flashlight Torch Zoom Light Charger 14500 Battery) was shipped from China and took 15 days to arrive. Not a problem for me since it was really inexpensive.

[Flashlight]
The flashlight looks identical to one I purchased earlier (JOYLAND Mini LED Flashlight), except it has just one power mode instead of three (High/Low/Strobe). Closer look at the Amazon product page shows "single mode: on/off". But several other reviewers claim to have received the three-mode version. So I guess it is just a matter of luck.

[Power Consumption]
I tested both flashlights under the same conditions. The Joyland unit consumes input current of ~1.2A when powered by the 14500 Li-ion battery. This corresponds to about 4 watt of input power, which is consistent with the advertised light output of '300 lumens'.

The MECO unit consumes input current of ~0.8A initially, but then the light suddenly cut off with a tiny 'pop'. This flashlight is no more! It has ceased to be! It's expired and gone to meet its maker! This is an ex-flashlight!

[Battery Charger]
The charger has a single LED indicator: Red when charging, Green when done. A faint ringing sound can be heard whenever the charger is plugged in.

In standby mode, the charger consumes 0.3 watt according to my EUM-A1 Power Usage Meter. When charging either one or two 14500 cells, the charger consumes 2.7W. This suggests the charging current is around 500-600mA total, shared between two cells. On the charger it says: "Output: DC 4.2V 600mAh" which is the wrong unit ('mAh' is the unit for capacity, not current).

[Batteries]
The two 14500 Li-ion batteries I received are labeled 'Ultrafire 1200mAh'. I connected a 5-ohm power resistor as load, and monitor the battery’s output current and voltage over time. I expect each battery to provide around 700mA for 1.5 hours. But they both dropped dead after just around 30 minute (see the “Output Current vs. Time” chart I uploaded). The actual measured capacities are 310 and 420mAh, respectively. That means they can only deliver 1/4 to 1/3 of their advertised capacity.

Previously I have tested some Ultrafire 3500mAh 1.2V NiMH AA Rechargeable Batteries. Their average measured capacity is only around 500mAh, or 1/7 of their advertised value. So at least Ultrafire is very consistent in making false advertisement about battery capacities.

[Bottom Line]
I thought I got a great deal on this package, but the product quality is just unacceptable. The LED flashlight burnt out within minutes, and the batteries only deliver 1/3 to 1/4 of the rated capacity. I’m sending it back for a refund.

[Update on May 13, 2016]
The vendor issued a speedy refund. So I bumped the rating to 2-star for good customer service.
Comment Comment | Permalink


16 AA NiMH Pre-Charged 1.2v 2100mAh Rechargable Batteries By GP Recyko
16 AA NiMH Pre-Charged 1.2v 2100mAh Rechargable Batteries By GP Recyko
Offered by MYBATTERYSUPPLIER
Price: $21.91
2 used & new from $21.91

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long term charge-retention rate on par with Sanyo/Panasonic eneloop, May 8, 2016
I purchased a set of these GP Recyko+ NiMH Pre-Charged Rechargable AA Batteries back in Nov 2010. Initial testing, using my La Crosse BC1000 Battery Charger/Analyzer, showed that they have an average capacity of 2228mAh, or 6% higher than rated capacity of '2100mAh'. (Note that on the package it says "Min 2000mAh, typ 2100mAh").

At the time, this was the highest capacity I measured among all low-self-discharge AA cells. Over the past few years, I have found other LSD cells with even higher capacities, including:
- IMEDION AA 2400 mAh low self-discharge batteries (measured capacity ~2450mAh)
- Panasonic eneloop Pro (rated 2550mAh, measured ~2600mAh)
- AmazonBasics High-Capacity Pre-Charged Rechargeable Batteries and Duracell 'Ion Core' AA Rechargeable Batteries (both are rebranded eneloop Pro cells)

However, the GP Recyko+ is still a very good value since it can often be bought for much lower cost. As of this writing, for example, the unit price of these GP Recyko+ AA batteries is less than 50% that of eneloop Pro.

[Self Discharge Rate]
I have tested a set of four GP Recyko+ AA cells after about 3 years of storage. I’m delighted to find that their long term charge-retention rate is as good as that of eneloop cells:

- One pair of GP Recyko+ AA cells was tested after 33 months of storage. The average remaining charge was 1681mAh. This is 75% of measured original capacity, or 80% of the rated capacity (2100mAh).
- Another pair was tested after 41 months of storage and gave an average charge of 1602mAh. This is 72% of measured original capacity, or 76% of rated capacity.

Just for reference, Panasonic claims eneloop can maintain 75 percent of their charge after 3 years of storage at 20 degree C.

[Physical Size]
There is one caution I need to make: Those GP Recyko+ AA cells are slightly thicker than eneloop AA cells (which are already thicker than ordinary alkaline AA cells). So they may not fit in appliances with extremely tight battery compartment (such as my Microsoft Wireless Notebook Mouse). This is a common problem with rechargeable NiMH cells in general. Therefore you should try those for size in your intended appliances, before committing to a large quantity of them.

[Bottom Line]
The GP Recyko+ batteries start out with higher capacity than regular Panasonic eneloop cells, and self-discharge at the same rate. Therefore I consider GP Recyko+ a great low-cost alternative to the better known Panasonic eneloop.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 10, 2016 2:17 PM PDT


Energizer WRLMF35E TESCO LED Lantern
Energizer WRLMF35E TESCO LED Lantern
Offered by Life and Home
Price: $18.99
8 used & new from $18.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cheaply made LED lantern with ZERO regulation / Not really Waterproof, May 5, 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm disappointed to find out that this Energizer Weatheready LED Area Lantern does not have any power regulation at all. The LEDs are just driven by the three batteries through a series resistor. As a result, its power (and hence LED brightness) is highly sensitive to battery voltage.

According to my measurement:
- When powered by three fresh alkaline cells (combined voltage of 4.5V), the lantern consumes 1 Watt of input power at High; 0.5W at Low.
- When powered by three NiMH rechargeable cells (combined voltage of 3.6V), the input power drops to just 0.4W at High; 0.2W at Low. That means the brightness is also cut by half.
(See the "Input Power vs. Battery Voltage" chart for details)

According the package I received, the lantern should produce 160 lumens of light at High mode. I find that hard to believe, because it requires a light efficacy of 160 lumens per watt, which sounds too good to be true. The Amazon description page claims 55 lm at high, 28 lm at Low.

The package further claims this lantern is waterproof up to 1 meter. I find that hard to believe, since the lantern body is made of very cheap plastic with rough edges. So I filled my kitchen sink with water, and submerged the lantern in it. To my horror, air bubbles started escaping throughout the lantern: top, bottom and middle. Now there's still some water trapped inside my lantern. I really don't see how Energizer can call this lantern 'Waterproof'.

On the positive side, the LED lantern does work with either three D cells or three AA cells (using the included AA-to-D adapter). So in case of emergency, I can always find some batteries to run it.

Overall, I found this Energizer lantern to be barely acceptable, hence the 3-star rating.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 8, 2016 7:32 PM PDT


2 x USB AA 1450mAh 1.2V Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries
2 x USB AA 1450mAh 1.2V Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries
Offered by Alex NLD - Worldwide Free Shipping
Price: $18.73

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cool idea, but measured capacity is much lower than advertised, May 2, 2016
I have reviewed a very similar product called USBCELL back in 2008. At that time, I said it was an ingenious product, just not very practical due to its high price (about 10 USD per cell) and low capacity (1300mAh). This product (USBBatt AA Rechargeable Battery) is available at lower cost and it claims to have higher capacity of 1450mAh. So I thought I should give it another try.

Both USBCell and USBBatt are based on the same idea: take a 2/3 AA cell and stick a simple USB charger on top. Now you have a battery that can be recharged either through its USB port, or in an ordinary NiMH AA charger. The charger contains a status light. The LED is Red when charging, Blue when done. The measured charging current is about 180-190mA, so to fully recharge a 1450mAh cell should take at least 8 hours, because 1450mAh/180mA = 8 hr. Note that the product description says "Charge Time 2-3 hours", which makes no sense unless you’re using a rapid charger. When done, there is a 30mA trickle charge current to keep the battery fresh.

The USBBatt can be charged using a normal NiMH AA charger. I tested it using my La Crosse BC1000 Charger and here are my findings:
- The batteries arrived with an average capacity of 540mAh.
- After one recharge/discharge cycle, the average capacity increased to 844mAh.
- After another FOUR more cycles, the average capacity only increased slightly to 858mAh.

So my measured capacity of USBBatt is only 59% of its advertised '1450mAh'. In contrast, the measured capacity of eneloop 2000mAh AA batteries is typically close to 2100mAh in my BC1000.

Next, I charged those USBBatt by plugging them into USB ports. Their LEDs changed color after 3-4 hours, which seems too short. The measured capacity this time is even lower: only 600-700mAh. That means you can only expect 40-50% of the rated capacity if you charge through USB port.

Long-term self-discharge rate, on the other hand, is quite good. After 16 months in storage, the average remaining charge measured is 465mAh, or about 55% of the original charge. This retention rate is better than most ordinary (non Low Self Discharge) NiMH batteries.

The workmanship of those batteries was poor. One of the two cells was showing 0.00V upon arrival. I thought the battery was completely discharged. But it turns out that the positive terminal cap was not making electrical contact with the battery internally. After some 'gentle persuasion' using my needle-nose pliers, it was working again.

[Summary]
I'm disappointed at the low capacity and poor workmanship of those USBBatt cells. Even at lower cost, it is still not a practical product in general. Only for certain low power applications (such as wireless mouse) the USBBatt may be considered. On the positive side, at least the LED light looks cool while charging.


Kastar AA 2700mAh 2PCS(1-PACK) Rechargeable Ni-MH Batteries
Kastar AA 2700mAh 2PCS(1-PACK) Rechargeable Ni-MH Batteries
Offered by KastarUSA
Price: $6.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Measured capacity is up to spec, but NOT Low Self-Discharge type, April 29, 2016
I bought a set of four KASTAR AA Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries three months ago, because they claim to be 'Pre-Charged' with usually high capacity of '2700mAh'. In contrast, all name brand pre-charged batteries I have tested only offer capacity up to ~2500mAh.

Upon arrival, I inserted those batteries in my La Crosse BC1000 Battery Charger for a quick check. Three out of four cells show initial voltage of 1.28V, which is a good sign. However, the 4th cell shows only 1.15V, which means it is nearly exhausted. Well, so much for the claim of "Pre-charged" and "holds 75% power after 3 years".

[Capacity Testing]
Next, I put those cells through Discharge/Refresh operation on the BC1000. Here are my results:
Round 1: Cell#1-3 show 2070 - 2160mAH (Good), but cell#4 just 276mAh (Bad)
Round 2: average capacity jumped to 2677mAh
Round 3: average capacity = 2685 mAh

Round 7: final capacity = 2737.5 mAh (2650 - 2840mAh)

The above progress looks suspiciously similar to that of EBL High Capacity 2800mAh AA Ni-MH Pre-charged Rechargeable Batteries I tested more than a year ago. But I noticed there are some mechanical differences between positive/negative terminals of EBL and Kastar batteries, so they were probably not made in the same factory.

[Self-Discharge Rate]
I tested one pair of KASTAR AA cells after 90 days in storage. The average remaining charge is 2190mAh (2220, 2160), or 80% of the original capacity. This charge retention rate is slightly better than that of EBL AA batteries (around 75% left after 3 months), but definitely not in the same league as name-brand LSD batteries such as Panasonic eneloop.

Both Kastar and EBL product description pages make identical claims of "Low self-discharge... holds 75% power after 3 years" and "extend lifespan up to 1200 cycles". It sounds like those claims were simply copied from the same source without any supporting data.

[Bottom Line]
My test results show that Kastar batteries do meet the '2700mAh' capacity rating. However, they are NOT 'low self-discharge' as advertised. If you just need high-capacity regular NiMH batteries, they may be still worth considering. Otherwise, stick with proven name brands such as eneloop PRO and AmazonBasics High-Capacity Pre-Charged.


Great Value LED 10W Soft White A19 Dimmable Light Bulb
Great Value LED 10W Soft White A19 Dimmable Light Bulb
Offered by Xsellr8r
Price: $9.79
12 used & new from $6.15

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Inexpensive LED bulb with marginal heatsink design (but still a Great Value), April 25, 2016
Purchased this product (Great Value LED 10W Soft White A19 Dimmable Light Bulb) at a big-box store due to its extremely low cost, which was about half of the present Amazon price. Most LED bulbs in this price range are marketed as 'Non-Dimmable', which means they are incompatible with TRIAC dimmers designed for incandescent bulbs.

[Physical Appearance]
The front of the package is labeled “Great Value”, while on the back of the package it says: "Engineered by TCP". The bulb is shaped like an incandescent A19 bulb. Its light distribution is also close to omni-directional like that of an incandescent bulb. See my uploaded picture for size comparison with other '60W-equivalent' LED bulbs.

[Power Consumption]
According to my EUM-A1 Power Usage Meter (which has a resolution of 0.1W), the bulb initially consumes 9.9W. This is consistent with its power rating of 10W.
- After 40 min, the power consumption drops to 9.3W
- After 70 min, the power drops further to 8.8W, which is 11% lower than its initial value.

The above suggests that the thermal design is marginal, so the bulb has to fold back its power when it gets too hot.

Note that my test was conducted with the bulb in an open-air light fixture. I can imagine the thermal fold back will be even worse if it is placed in a totally enclosed fixture. Ironically, on the bulb it actually claims "Suitable for use in totally enclosed luminaries". Maybe this is the secret: the power consumption drops when the bulbs gets hot, so it will not suffer thermal-runaway failure. But that also means this '60W-equivalent' bulb works more like '50W-equivalent' when hot.

[Dimming Performance]
See my uploaded picture for comparison against three other LED bulbs:
- Philips 11W 880 lm 'Funnel' Bulb: It shows the widest dimming range.
- Feit 9.5W 810 lm: About the same dimming range as the TCP bulb,
- Philips 8.5W 800 lm: This one is officially non-dimmable, but I threw it in just for fun.

[Bottom Line]
The TCP blub has marginal heatsink design, so its power (and hence light output) drops when the bulb gets hot. This seems to be a common problem with most low-cost LED bulb I have tested lately. Given its extremely low cost (at least from the big-box store) and decent dimming performance, I still consider it a Great Value.
Comment Comment | Permalink


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