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NLee the Engineer RSS Feed (Nashua, NH)
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HDE Universal International 4-Port USB AC Adapter Travel Wall Charger Kit with Interchangeable Travel Adapters
HDE Universal International 4-Port USB AC Adapter Travel Wall Charger Kit with Interchangeable Travel Adapters
Offered by HDE
Price: $11.95
9 used & new from $8.95

2.0 out of 5 stars By careful not to exceed 2.1A TOTAL output current, October 1, 2014
The best feature of this product (HDE Universal International 4-Port USB AC Adapter Travel Wall Charger) is that it comes with four interchangeable travel adapters. It is also very inexpensive for a 4-port charger. Unfortunately, its electrical design leaves much to be desired.

I tested the output current of this wall charger, using the PortaPow USB Power Monitor. The first thing I found was that it was unable to recharge my Barnes & Noble NOOK HD+ Tablet (which requires 2A) at full speed. It does not matter if I use the two ports labeled `i' (for Apple?) or `G' (for General?) - the results are exactly the same. This is disappointing, but at least it was able to recharge my other tablets at up to 1.5A each.

I then connected two tablets plus a cell phone to this charger, with a combined current of 3.5A. Everything appeared to be charging just fine initially. After less than one hour, however, the blue indicator light on the charger went out. I removed the charger from AC socket. The unit was very hot and there was a strong odor of burnt circuit board. Evidentially, the power converter overheated from the heavy load and burned itself up.

I cracked open the case and found a damaged THX203H control IC inside. This IC is rated for 12W continuous, 18W peak output power. That explains why it was able to supply 3.5A for a short while (5V * 3.5A = 17.5W), but eventually burnt out.

Bottom Line:
The TOTAL output current from 4 USB ports is limited to 2.1A max. That means if you connect 4 devices to this unit, then each device is only allowed to draw 0.5A. Conversely, if you connect an iPad to one port, then you are not allowed to use any other ports. In any case, I find it inexcusable for an AC power converter to have no thermal protection. So I cannot recommend this product.

I later purchased the Poweradd 25W 5V/5A 5-Port Desktop USB Charger and found it to work as advertised. Read my review on it for details:
http://www.amazon.com/review/RPVC2UQAF1PV1/


360 Electrical 36053 Power Curve Mobile Surge Protector with Rotating Outlet and USB Ports
360 Electrical 36053 Power Curve Mobile Surge Protector with Rotating Outlet and USB Ports
Price: $17.98
13 used & new from $15.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful rotating outlets / USB ports output 2.1A TOTAL, September 28, 2014
I already own two similar products: Monster Outlets To Go MP OTG300 and Philips Travel Surge Protector. But somehow I'm still running out of AC outlets and USB charging ports in the house. That's why I recently purchased this 360 Electrical 36053 Power Curve Mobile Surge Protector with Rotating Outlet and USB Ports.

First impression: the unit is not as compact as it seems on product picture. This is because from the picture you can't tell how tall the unit is. The actual unit is a full 2 inches tall. It may not fit in tight spaces.

Second, the two outlets on the unit can be rotated 360-degree (hence the name). But the AC plug of the unit itself does not rotate. That means when this unit is plugged into AC outlet on the wall, the two outlets are always positioned to the right. On my office workbench, however, the AC outlets are positioned horizontally and this unit cannot be used.

The rotating outlets, on the other hand, turn out more useful than I expected. This feature is especially appreciated when I need to plug two bulky 'wall warts' (AC adapters) to the same unit.

About the USB ports' current capability: Amazon product description says '1-Amp', while the back of the packaging says '2.1A Total'. What is not explained is whether each port can provide 2.1A.

I did my own load test for the two USB ports, using the DROK Dual-USB Output Charging Detector to measure the currents. Here is what I determined:
- Each port, when used by itself, is able to supply up to 2.2A at 5V
- The TOTAL current from two ports is still limited to 2.2A
- When I tried to draw more than 2.2A total current, the output voltage drops rapidly below 5V. This is actually a good thing because it means there is an output current limiting circuit inside. A cheaply designed product (such as the HDE 4 Port USB to AC Wall Charger) may attempt to supply higher current, but eventually will burn itself up.

Bottom Line:
Overall, I consider this unit a good value for my money. I hope to bring it for my next oversea trip, just to verify that it actually works at 220V AC (it should, according to manufacturer's web site).


SanDisk 32GB CZ43 Ultra Fit Series USB 3.0 Flash Drive (SDCZ43-032G-G46)
SanDisk 32GB CZ43 Ultra Fit Series USB 3.0 Flash Drive (SDCZ43-032G-G46)
Offered by CalvinNHobbs
Price: $14.99
17 used & new from $14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delivers 148MB/s in Sequential Read - when connected to an USB 3.0 port, September 25, 2014
This SanDisk 32GB CZ43 Ultra Fit Series USB 3.0 Flash Drive (SDCZ43-032G-G46) is so tiny, it makes my old SanDisk Cruzer Micro USB drive looks like a dinosaur! See the picture I uploaded to 'Customer Images' section for size comparison.
www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B00LLER2CS/

The new drive is also 5-10x faster. On the package it says "Speed up to 130MB/s". This claim is valid based to my testing. I used a benchmark program (CrystalDiskMark v3.0.1 x64) to measure the Sequential Read/Write speed of this Sandisk Ultra Fit flash drive on two computers. Here are my findings:

- When connected to a computer with USB 2.0 port:
Sequential Read = 34.8MB/s, Sequential Write = 18.6MB/s

- When connected to a computer with USB 3.0 port:
Sequential Read = 148.4MB/s, Sequential Write = 39.4MB/s
(see the pictures I uploaded to 'Customer Images' section for details)

The above shows that this flash drive's Read speed is even faster than advertised. But you must use it on an USB 3.0 port to unlock its full potential. This is because the old USB 2.0 port has a theoretical speed limit of 60MB/s. In practice the highest I have seen is just around 36MB/s, as in this case.

Other notes:
1. The capacity of this '32GB' drive, as reported by my computer, is only 29.8GB. This is actually normal because computer people count one Gig as "2 to the power 30", which is 7.3% greater than one billion. So 29.8GB comes to 31.99 billion bytes, which is called '32GB' by marketing people

2. The 32GB version of this flash drive is formatted in FAT32 for maximum compatibility. But the file size has a max limit of 4GB each. The 64GB drive is formatted in exFAT, which allows larger files. The problem is that exFAT may not be recognized by older computers and appliances. So suppose you want to plug the 64GB flash drive into your TV to play movies, make sure the latter is compatible with exFAT.

3. There is a small hole on this flash drive for attaching a lanyard, but none is provided. It is a good idea to find a lanyard - before the tiny drive got lost.

4. The drive does become warm when plugged into the USB port. This is normal and there's nothing to worry about.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 26, 2014 8:08 AM PDT


EBL® High Capacity 2300mAh 1500 Cycle AA Ni-MH Pre-charged Rechargeable Batteries AA, 12 Pack
EBL® High Capacity 2300mAh 1500 Cycle AA Ni-MH Pre-charged Rechargeable Batteries AA, 12 Pack
Offered by AIBOCN
Price: $49.99
2 used & new from $18.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars WARNING: EBL 'Pre-Charged' batteries are NOT Low-Self-Discharge type, September 22, 2014
About four months ago, I purchased a set of the EBL High Capacity 2300mAh 1500 Cycle AA Ni-MH Pre-charged Rechargeable Batteries, in addition to the EBL 1500 Cycle 1100mAh AAA Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries. Most name brand pre-charged batteries (such as Sanyo eneloop) are only rated 2000-2100mAh for AA, 800mAh for AAA. Those EBL batteries looked like great values since they claim to be 'Pre-Charged' and offer higher capacity at lower price.

I tested four of those EBL 2300mAh AA batteries, using my La Crosse BC1000 Battery Charger/Analyzer. After just three Discharge/Refresh cycles, the average capacity leveled off at 2555mAh. This is 11% HIGHER than the advertised '2300mAh', and on par with the far more expensive eneloop XX (2500mAh). The AAA version gave an average capacity of 1040mAh. Looks good so far...

Their long term charge-retention rates, however, did not live up to the hype.

- I checked two of those EBL AA batteries after 90 days of storage. Their remaining charges were 1711mAh and 1828mAh, respectively. This corresponds to just 66% and 71% of their originally measured capacity of 2580-2590mAh.

- I also checked four EBL AAA cells after 100 days of storage. They were even worse. One cell was completely dead (0mAh). The other three range from 695 to 848mAh, or 63-77% of rated capacity.

EBL claims "Improved low self discharge makes it still maintain 75% of capacity after 3 year of non-use". This claim proves to be completely bogus. The self-discharge rates of those EBL batteries are similar to that of ordinary NiMH batteries. They should never be advertised as 'Pre-Charged' or 'Low-Self-Discharge' in the same league of Sanyo eneloop.

Similarly, I cannot trust the cycle-life claim for those EBL batteries. Notice that the title of this product says '1500 Cycles', while the product description says "can be recharged up to 1200 times". It sounds like EBL marketing people simply pulled those numbers out of their you-know-where. They probably figured that most users cannot tell the difference, anyway.

Bottom Line:
I despise false advertisement. Therefore I cannot recommend this or any other EBL products.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 28, 2014 9:26 PM PDT


4 Pack 1.2V 3500mAh AA Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries
4 Pack 1.2V 3500mAh AA Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries
Offered by Olymstore
Price: $5.29

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Completely bogus capacity rating - Measured around 500mAh!, September 19, 2014
The advertised capacity of this product (4 Pack 1.2V 3500mAh AA Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries) sounded too good to be true, since most NiMH AA batteries are rated 2000-2800mAH. That's why I decided to verify it.

The pack of AA rechargeable batteries I received have the brand name "UltraFire" and the capacity marking of "Min. 3500mAh" printed on each cell. I tested them upon arrival, using my La Crosse BC1000 battery charger/analyzer. Here are my findings:
- Right out of the package, the average remaining charge was only 405mAh
- After the first charge/discharge cycle, the average capacity increased to 484mAh
- After another 4-5 cycles in Refresh/Discharge mode, the average capacity increased marginally to 512mAh. This is just 14.6% of the rated capacity of '3500mAh'.

I tried to apply 'Break-In' operation using my Maha MH-C9000 charger, but the charger reported 'HIGH' (high internal resistance) on all four cells and refused to charge them.

I then manually re-started the 'Discharge/Refresh' operation several more times. Instead of seeing a steady increase in capacities, the numbers actually decreased with each cycle. After 6 cycles, the average capacity dropped to just 479mAh.

Conclusion:
The capacity rating of UltraFire AA rechargeable batteries is completely bogus. You'll need to connect SEVEN of those AA cells in parallel, in order to achieve the advertised '3500mAh' capacity. Don't waste your money on this or any other products from UltraFire.

In case you're looking for inexpensive rechargeable batteries with honest capacity rating, consider the Tenergy Centura AA Low Self-Discharge NiMH Rechargeable Batteries. They are rated 2000mAh but tested ~2100mAh.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 28, 2014 3:03 PM PDT


EBL® 12 Pack High Capacity 2800mAh AA Ni-MH Pre-charged Rechargeable Batterie, 1500 Cycle
EBL® 12 Pack High Capacity 2800mAh AA Ni-MH Pre-charged Rechargeable Batterie, 1500 Cycle
Offered by AIBOCN
Price: $54.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Those are regular NiMH batteries (NOT Low-Self-Discharge type), September 15, 2014
I purchased a set of EBL High Capacity 2800mAh AA Ni-MH Pre-charged Rechargeable Batteries 4 months ago, just to check them out. Previously, the highest capacity Pre-charged (or low-self-discharge) NiMH batteries I have tested were the eneloop XX, which are only rated 2500mAh.

Initial testing of those EBL high-capacity AA batteries, using my La Crosse BC1000 Battery Charger, looked very promising. After several Discharge/Recharge cycles, their average capacity reached 2720mAh, or 97% of the rated capacity. So the capacity rating claim seems to be accurate.

Long term self-discharge rate, however, is another story. I measured the remaining charge for two sets of EBL batteries (4x AA and 4x AAA) after 100 days of storage. Here is what I observed:

- The four AA cells showed remaining charge from 1800 to 2090mAh. This corresponds to 64-75% of the rated capacities.

- The four AAA cells were even worse. One cell was completely dead (0mAh). The other three range from 695 to 848mAh, or 63-77% of rated capacity.

EBL claims "Improved low self discharge makes it still maintain 75% of capacity after 3 year of non-use", the same rate as that of Sanyo eneloop Pre-Charged Rechargeable Batteries. This claim proves to be completely bogus. The self-discharge rates of those EBL batteries are close to that of ordinary NiMH batteries. They should never be advertised as 'Pre-Charged' or 'Low-Self-Discharge'.

Similarly, I cannot trust the cycle-life claim for those EBL batteries. Notice that the title of this product says '1500 Cycles', while the product description says ""can be recharged up to 1200 times". It sounds like EBL marketing people simply pulled those numbers out of their you-know-where.

I despise false advertisement. Therefore I cannot recommend those EBL rechargeable batteries.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 19, 2014 11:58 AM PDT


DROK Dual-USB Output Charging Detector Digital LED Ammter Voltmeter Guage DC Display 3.2-10V 0-3A Red/Blue
DROK Dual-USB Output Charging Detector Digital LED Ammter Voltmeter Guage DC Display 3.2-10V 0-3A Red/Blue
Offered by WFY-MALL
Price: $9.33
14 used & new from $7.48

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My new favorite USB power monitor, September 12, 2014
With over a dozen USB-powered devices, power banks and AC adapters in the house, I need a USB power monitor to tell me which power source works well charging what devices. I have been using a similar product called PortaPow USB Power Monitor for the last few months. Recently I purchased this DROK Dual-USB Output Charging Detector because it advertises several features I like:

1. It has a dual-display to show both voltage and current simultaneously. For the PortaPow meter, I need to toggle a mechanical switch to select either voltage or current to display.

2. It allows two USB devices to be plugged in at the same time, so it doubles as a port-extender. Note that the port on top can be used for both charging and USB communication, while the port below is for charging only.

[LED display]
The color LED display (Red for Voltage, Blue for Current) on the DROK unit is beautiful and very easy to read. In contrast, the LCD panel on PortaPow unit can be difficult to see under dim light. At first I was worried that the use of LED display will make it consume more power. But the actual standby current I measured is less than 10mA (the product description says '<20mA')

[Accuracy]
Both DROK and PortaPow units claim to have an accuracy of 1%. However, in my comparison against a DMM (digital multimeter), both units missed the goal. But at least the DROK unit is closer to target. For example:

- When I insert the DROK unit in series with my DMM, the DMM reported 1.35A while the DROK reported 1.37A (0.02A too high)

- When I insert the PortaPow unit in series with my DMM, the DMM reported 1.32A while the PortaPow reported 1.36A (0.04A too high)

The result above also indicates that the PortaPow unit introduced more series resistance, hence the output voltage drops lower, resulting in slightly lower charging current.

[Bottom Line]
I consider the DROK USB meter to be a better product than the PortaPow unit, because:
- It can display both Voltage and Current at the same time
- Its LED display is much easier to read than the LCD panel
- It gives more accurate current reading
- It introduces less resistive drop

The only negative I can say about this product: it comes with ZERO documentation. So you really have to read all the specs and operating instructions from the Amazon product page and user reviews.

Currently the DROK unit is available at lower price than the PortaPow unit, so there's no doubt which product I recommend.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 19, 2014 8:21 PM PDT


Lexar High-Performance microSDHC 300x 32GB UHS-I Flash Memory Card LSDMI32GBBNL300A
Lexar High-Performance microSDHC 300x 32GB UHS-I Flash Memory Card LSDMI32GBBNL300A
Price: $24.99
36 used & new from $20.16

5.0 out of 5 stars Delivers 45MB/s as advertised - if you use the correct card reader and USB port, September 9, 2014
The Lexar High-Performance microSDHC 300x 32GB UHS-I Flash Memory Card LSDMI32GBBNL300A is advertised as '300x', which means 45MB/s ('1x' = 150KB/s, a left-over from the early days of CD-ROM drives). But it can only deliver this speed if you use a card reader that is designed to be UHS-1 compatible. Older generation card readers will limit the maximum transfer speed to 20MB/s or lower.

For example, when I first tested the Sequential Read/Write speed of this Lexar card using my old Transcend M5 Multi-Card Reader, it shows Read=20MB/s and Write=17.6MB/s. Although this performance exceeds that of a typical 'class-10' card (which means at least 10MB/s in Write), it is far from the advertised 45MB/s.

When I repeated the benchmark using the Transcend Information USB 3.0 Card Reader (TS-RDF5K), I observed a more respectable reading of Read=35MB/s and Write=21.6MB/s. This shows that my old card reader was the bottleneck. However, I suspect the Read speed is still being limited by the maximum data transfer rate of my USB 2.0 port (theoretically up to 60MB/s, but practically around 36MB/s).

Finally, I conducted the same test on a computer with USB 3.0 port. This time, the Lexar card gave Read=45.5MB/s, and Write=23.5MB/s. See the screenshot I uploaded to 'Customer Image' section for details of the benchmark.

When compared to my other microSDHC cards, the Lexar card came in second after the SanDisk Extreme 16 GB microSDHC Card. The Sandisk Extreme card gave similar Read speed, but much faster Write speed of 32MB/s (See the comparison chart in 'Customer Images' section for details). Considering that the Lexar card is slightly cheaper, I'm equally satisfied with both cards.

Remarks:
- The capacity of this '32GB' card, as reported by my computer, is just 29.8GB. This is actually normal because computer people count one Giga as "2 to the power 30", which is 7.3% larger than on billion. So 29.8GB is equal to 32 billion bytes, which is called '32GB' by marketing people.

- Lexar also offers an even faster 633x card (LSDMI32GBBNL633R). But I'm too cheap to go for it.


Rayovac 7-Hour Power Back-Up Charger
Rayovac 7-Hour Power Back-Up Charger
Offered by rainbowriffic
Price: $14.26
4 used & new from $5.25

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Primitive voltage regulator / Poor utilization of disposable batteries, September 7, 2014
I purchased the Rayovac 7-Hour Power Back-Up Charger (PS73) from my local HarDware store, because the price was too good to pass up (it was cheaper than buying 8 alkaline batteries alone). I figured that it could come in handy in case my neighborhood suffers yet another extended power outage. After testing the PS73 power pack, however, I was disappointed.

I expect the PS73 to contain a power converter to regulate the 5V output at USB port, whether the input battery voltage is 6V (when using a fresh set of 4 alkaline cells) or 4.8V (when using 4 NiMH cells). As it turns out, the PS73 has a simple linear regulator inside, so it is only able to step-down the battery voltage, but not boost up.

When using a set of fresh alkaline cells, the combined voltage is 6V (1.5V * 4), so the USB output port can be regulated at 5V (the extra 1V is wasted internally). As the alkaline batteries become partially used up and the combined voltage drops to 4.8V (1.2V *4), the USB output voltage drops to just 4.5 - 4.6V (the regulator itself drops additional 0.2-0.3V). This is the same situation when using a set NiMH cells (1.2V * 4). An output of 4.5V is borderline too low for most USB-power devices.

How much energy can the PS73 extract from a set of 4 alkaline AA cells?
A typical AA alkaline cell can only deliver 500mA for around 2 hours, before its terminal voltage drops below 1.2V. So the total energy that can be delivered by this charger is 5V * 0.5A * 2 hr = 5Wh. This is a relatively small amount of energy given the size and weight of this package. Just as an example, to fully recharge the 2100mAh lithium-ion battery in my Samsung Galaxy S3 cell phone requires 3.7V * 2.1Ah = 7.8Wh of energy, not counting conversion losses. So the PS73 is only able to recharge my S3 by about 60%, after exhausting one set of alkaline cells.

The 3-LED battery status indicator comes on whenever an USB plug is inserted (there is a mechanical switch inside the USB port to turn on the voltage regulator). It consumes 20mA and is excessively bright. This is just a waste of power - unless you like to use it as a nightlight. The number of LEDs seems to correspond to the output voltage as shown below:
- 3 green LEDs = Over 4.7V
- 2 green LEDs = 4.6 to 4.7V
- 1 green LED = 4.4 to 4.6V
- 1 Red LED = Under 4.4V

Conclusion:
All things considered, the PS73 is still useful as a last-resort charger. Suppose there is an extended power outage and I have exhausted all my rechargeable power bank units, I can put alkaline batteries in this product, just to get some power for my essential USB devices. I consider it an 'Okay' value at the low price I paid. But I cannot recommend it at the present Amazon price (15 USD). For about the same price, you can easily get a power bank unit such as the KMAX-812 4400mAh Rechargeable Backup Battery Pack. It can deliver 3x the energy (15Wh), at half the size and weight of this PS73.

If you need a well-designed power converter that takes alkaline or NiMH cells as power source, consider the Duracell Mobile Charger CEF23AU. It can step down as well as boost up battery voltage, to maintain a regulated 5V output. The converter will continue to function even when battery voltage has dropped to 3.6V, so it is able to squeeze at least 50% more power from a set of alkaline cells.

On the positive side, the PS73 is a lot better than the Burro Mobile Charger. The Burro does not even have a voltage regulator, just a diode and a series resistor inside. Now THAT is a real piece of trash.


12 Rechargeable AA and 12 Rechargeable AAA Ni-MH GP Pre-Charged Batteries
12 Rechargeable AA and 12 Rechargeable AAA Ni-MH GP Pre-Charged Batteries
Offered by MYBATTERYSUPPLIER
Price: $30.91
2 used & new from $30.91

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long term charge-retention rate on par with Sanyo eneloop, September 4, 2014
I purchased a set of GP Recyko NiMH Pre-Charged Rechargable AA Batteries back in Nov 2010. Initial testing, using my La Crosse BC-900 Battery Charger/Analyzer, showed that they have an average capacity of 2228mAh, or 6% higher than rated capacity of '2100mAh'. (Note that on the package it says "Min 2000mAh, typ 2100mAh").

At the time, this was the highest capacity I measured among all low-self-discharge AA cells. Over the past few years, I have found other LSD cells with even higher capacities, including:
- IMEDION AA 2400 mAh low self-discharge batteries (measured capacity ~2450mAh)
- Sanyo Eneloop XX (rated 2500mAh, measured ~2600mAh)
- AmazonBasics High-Capacity Pre-Charged Rechargeable Batteries and Duracell 'Ion Core' AA Rechargeable Batteries (both are rebranded Sanyo XX cells)

However, the GP Recyko is still a better value since it can be bought for much lower cost. As of this writing, for instant, the unit price ($/cell) for this GP Recyko+ package is less than 50% that of Sanyo XX cells.

Just recently, I re-tested a set of four GP Recyko+ AA cells after about 3 years of storage. I'm delighted to find that their long term charge-retention rate is as good as that of Sanyo eneloop:

- One pair of GP Recyko+ AA cells was tested after 33 months of storage. The average remaining charge was 1681mAh. This is 75% of the originally measured capacity, or 80% of the rated capacity (2100mAh).
- Another pair was tested after 41 months of storage and gave an average charge of 1602mAh. This is 72% of the original capacity, or 76% of rated capacity.

Just for reference, Sanyo claims 3rd-gen eneloop cells can maintain 75 percent of their charge after 3 years of storage at 20 degree C.

In short, the GP Recyko+ batteries start out with higher capacity than Sanyo eneloop, and self-discharge at the same rate. Therefore I consider GP Recyko+ an excellent alternative to the better known (and far more expensive) Sanyo eneloop.

There is, however, one caution I need to make: Those GP Recyko AA cells are slightly thicker than eneloop AA cells (which are already thicker than ordinary alkaline AA cells). So they may not fit in appliances with extremely tight battery compartment (such as my Microsoft Wireless Notebook Mouse). This is a common problem with rechargeable NiMH cells in general. Therefore you should try those for size in your intended appliances, before committing to a large quantity of them.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 28, 2014 9:35 PM PDT


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