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David Bowers "@iamdavebowers" RSS Feed (Boston, MA)

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Eclipse 54-Inch by 60-Inch Thermaliner Blackout Panel Pair, White
Eclipse 54-Inch by 60-Inch Thermaliner Blackout Panel Pair, White
Price: $21.56
6 used & new from $17.99

3.0 out of 5 stars however the hanging mechanism is very poor. When the curtain is moved, November 3, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The blackout function works well, however the hanging mechanism is very poor. When the curtain is moved, the liner becomes unhooked, and no longer performs the blackout function because it is no longer in place. The liner needs to be sewn to the curtain to work effectively. I am disappointed, since I purchased the item because sewing was not required.

There is also the option to hanging the liner directly to a curtain rod; my set up doesn't allow for that, so it isn't an option for me.


Painting
Painting
Price: $8.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars For Completionists Only, March 4, 2013
This review is from: Painting (MP3 Music)
Sadly, I must report, that this is the worst Ocean Colour Scene album by a country mile. I've bought every OCS album (studio, bestof, or live), nearly every single (including the 2CD singles), solo albums, dvds, attended many concerts, and purchased the T-shirts, and this is the only OCS purchase I've regretted.

It starts with six catchy, but forgettable tunes, with only "If God Made Everyone" having any lasting impact. Before it divebombs into the some of the worst lyrically and musically terrible songs the band has produced. Professor Perplexity is embarrassing, Mistaken Identity nonsensical. The last two songs are bland and would be b-sides on any other album.

The only truly good tracks are George's Tower, which is haunting but far too short, and The Union with it's excellent guitar riff and reminds me of Go To See Boys.

Perhaps the solo albums have taken their toll on the band as both SF and SC solo efforts are far superior to this album.

Sadly this album will go the way of On The Leyline and the Self Titled Album, pulled out only when I've overplayed everything else.


Kingston Digital SSDNow V+100 96 GB Solid-State Drive SVP100S2/96G
Kingston Digital SSDNow V+100 96 GB Solid-State Drive SVP100S2/96G

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hoped for more, December 4, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This became my boot drive for a Windows 7 installation on a dell pc. Only a few years old (see specs below), I expected to see huge speed increases, in particular boot times and loading within games. While the machine is faster once loaded, programs runner a little quicker and games have shorter load times, it's not significant. I timed the difference between booting to this in comparison to my old HDD and it shaved about 33% off the time. Not great.

Setup:
Q9400
6gb ddr2 ram
9800GT
96gb SSD
640gb HDD
1TB HDD
DVD drive
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 22, 2012 7:00 PM PDT


Social Media Analytics: Effective Tools for Building, Interpreting, and Using Metrics
Social Media Analytics: Effective Tools for Building, Interpreting, and Using Metrics
by Marshall Sponder
Edition: Hardcover
34 used & new from $5.83

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dissappointing, December 4, 2011
I'll be brief. I can't recommend this book. It neither covers easy to understand software for everyone, or how to us the high end expensive tools. The majority of the book covers social media analytics software companies, it reads like an advert, which is unsurprising as it appears the author owns, has worked for or with the majority of the companies.

Sadly I took few actionable items away from reading this book, which is a shame, as there's definitely room for some good books in this area.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 4, 2013 12:23 AM PST


Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs
by Walter Isaacson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.65
1001 used & new from $0.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable look at a unique individual, November 27, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Steve Jobs (Hardcover)
Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson offers an insight into the greatest marketing mind of this century.

While reviewing the book, it's difficult not to review Steve Jobs' life. The mastermind behind Macs, iPhones, iPads, iPods, and more, Steve had a complicated life at home and at work.

Steve's strengths inspired the meteoric rise of Apple to become the most valuable technology company in the world. Focusing as much on the user experience as the hardware, Steve's attention to detail and perfectionism helped grow a passionate, dedicated userbase. Initially positioning Apple as the rebels (see the 1984 advert) and targeting those that "Think Different", Apple grew to become the mainstream, the norm, and (at a push) "big-brother" like.

Their legendary marketing and strong branding (simply white) helped them maintain their reputation as cool, their products desirable and "must have", despite high prices and a walled-garden environment. While reading this book won't make you a professional marketer, it will help you understand the marketing decisions made for each product.

Having been hand-picked by Steve to write this book and with unique access given to interview Steve and his inner circle, you would expect Walter Isaacson to tone down Steve's darker side. He doesn't. We see Steve abandon a daughter, deceive his colleagues, insult those around him and hurt the ones he loved. Even growing older and with illness, Steve showed no signs of mellowing, even blaming the same doctors that helped save his life for allowing him to become ill (after Steve turned down a stomach pump that could have stopped the illness).

Before reading the book I disliked Steve Jobs' business practices (I'm a fan of open, not closed, technology). With greater insight I'm left feeling sorry for a truly conflicted individual that, while working at "intersection of the humanities and science", lost much of his humanity along the way.


Street Smarts: Beyond the Diploma
Street Smarts: Beyond the Diploma
by Jim Randel
Edition: Paperback
Price: $17.96
35 used & new from $5.18

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The knowledge you didn't realize you were missing, July 25, 2011
A lot of the books I review delve deeply into very specific topics, this is not the case with Street Smarts. Offering just one page per topic it covers everything from marketing yourself to buying a car, and everything in between.

The cover suggests it is for someone graduating from student to working professional, and while they certainly would benefit from reading this book, anyone can learn something from Street Smarts.
Jim Randel succeeds in showing you where your knowledge gaps are, areas you may not even have considered. He exposes your weaknesses and gives you ideas on how to turn them into strengths. He really covers a lot for such a short book. The concepts aren't original, but the presentation is. It's expert content, expertly curated. That's where the value lies.

And that's my one negative. Half the pages in this book are empty, containing either a quote or a picture. So really you're buying a 125 page book. This space could easily have helped provide even more pertinent information or covered a wider range of topics.

Despite this I fully recommend this book for what it achieves in such a short space. It's a quick read and it won't solve all your problems, but it will help identify them and set you on the right path.

Disclaimer - I was given a free copy of this book by the Publisher.


Likeable Social Media: How to Delight Your Customers, Create an Irresistible Brand, and Be Generally Amazing on Facebook (And Other Social Networks)
Likeable Social Media: How to Delight Your Customers, Create an Irresistible Brand, and Be Generally Amazing on Facebook (And Other Social Networks)
by Dave Kerpen
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.76
165 used & new from $4.43

136 of 158 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best social media book out there, June 22, 2011
I've read and reviewed a lot of books on Social Media and this is the first one I've given five stars. It's that good.

I'm a marketer, specializing in the digital realm and I've become increasingly annoyed at the self proclaimed Social Media Experts (SME's) out there. Most are full of hot air and sell snake oil. This is not the case with Dave Kerpen.

This book is clearly written with great examples by someone who has a vast knowledge of this area. Even better, he uses examples of his actual work within the book for us all to learn from (most social media books don't). Each chapter also ends with exercises for you to start considering how to implement the concepts into your business.

There are two aspects that separate this book from the rest. 1. Dave comes at it from the point of the user receiving the marketing and 2.Dave can easily be found on all social media sites giving out free advice, using the methods he describes in the book to grow his readership and business along with it. He walks the walk.

While I don't agree with every element of the book, my quibbles are not worth your time. Just understand that this book is worth purchasing.

I will be suggesting it to everyone I work with that suddenly wants to enter the social media space, but isn't sure why.

Disclaimer: I received a review copy of this book from McGraw Hill.


The Old Rules of Marketing are Dead: 6 New Rules to Reinvent Your Brand and Reignite Your Business
The Old Rules of Marketing are Dead: 6 New Rules to Reinvent Your Brand and Reignite Your Business
by Timothy R. Pearson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.17
75 used & new from $2.94

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read for anyone involved in branding, May 5, 2011
The Old Rules of Marketing are Dead (TOROMAD) is a book focused mostly on branding, brand reinvention and the core of your business. These sections are strong and should be read by anyone wanting a foundation in marketing and marketing messages. They cover everything from communicating and respecting your customer to understanding product quality, reputation and how to survive a recession. This book excels when using extremely relevant examples.

There's also a lot of good information for non-marketers, those wanting to understand what they do. It delves into why the CMO deserves a place at the management table.

The book does have one failing and that's the author's understanding (or lack of) of social media. He dismisses it. Says that you can't calculate ROI, that blogs only speak to existing customers and a number of other thoughts that I have seen in my daily job, are wrong. Ignore these parts and you have a very good book.

Disclosure: I received this as a review copy from McGraw-Hill


Curation Nation: How to Win in a World Where Consumers are Creators
Curation Nation: How to Win in a World Where Consumers are Creators
by Steven Rosenbaum
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.06
125 used & new from $0.02

31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Justification Nation, March 24, 2011
I'd like to start by saying that the author clearly has a passion and vast knowledge of the subject. He is the right author for a book on curation and has a lot of great contacts to source information from. However...

Curation Nation starts in an odd fashion, even by just looking at the cover. This book has two tag lines - "Why The Future of Content is Context" and "How to Win in a World Where Consumers are Creators". The most apt title title is the first. It is a 'why' book. But the reason you'd buy this book and the larger weighted subtitle is the second, which really isn't accurate at all. This is not a how to book, Steven even says so in reply to a review here on Amazon... "But it's not a how-to book".

The book falls foul of it's own subject. The book is poorly organised. The first quarter moves rapidly from introduction, to customer service, to how-to then general social media information. The rest of the book is just variations of 'Curation is important'. Which it is, but I'd suggest many of the actions Steve calls Curation (which involves adding value) are not.

The most interesting chapter is 'tools and techniques', but it is short and low on information. An opportunity to get the new curator started is lost as the book goes on to feature famous old media person after famous old media person who bought their way into new media.

Steven then goes on to attack search. "Search is broken. It's over. Done. Gone". Yet the examples he provides makes little sense. Why is it even in the book? Is search really considered a threat?

The book is also full of grammatical and spelling errors, the type of which a spell checker wouldn't pick up but a proof reader would have. Very odd.

I feel sad to give this only 2 stars considering the passion that went into it. This could have been a really good book had it focused on the 'how-to' and provided people the tools and techniques to get going. Instead it's just convincing readers of something they already know.
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Mining the Social Web: Analyzing Data from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Other Social Media Sites
Mining the Social Web: Analyzing Data from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Other Social Media Sites
by Matthew A. Russell
Edition: Paperback
33 used & new from $9.96

15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but lacking in practical examples, March 8, 2011
Mining the Social Web by Matthew Russell, published by O'Reilly, is an overview of data mining popular websites such as Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and more. It even goes as far as touching on the semantic web and the not-so-popular Google Buzz.

Each area is covered with a brief explanation of how to set up any programs, a look at the API, some examples of the mining code and a couple of suggestions on how to use it. The book covers a lot of ground which is either a blessing, or a curse, depending on what you're looking for.

I found this book only partially useful because it really didn't delve deeply into any one area. It could have focused solely on Twitter, showing more business, or personal specific examples. Instead we had sections on the semantic web and e-mail mining, while interesting, are not specific to a 'social web' book. Linkedin makes an appearance, one example used being grouping all your contacts with the same job title. How useful is this really? I understand it's an example but that's what I wanted more of - really useful examples I could apply to day-to-day business activities.

I'd recommend this book to anybody with some programming knowledge (Python being a huge help) who wants to know a little about a lot. For those looking for in-depth social mining techniques, I'd look elsewhere.

Disclosure: I received a free electronic copy of this book as party of the O'Reilly Blogger program
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 7, 2013 5:10 PM PDT


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