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Joseph H Pierre "Joe Pierre" RSS Feed (Salem, OR USA)
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Quicken 2005 Premier Home & Business [Old Version]
Quicken 2005 Premier Home & Business [Old Version]
Offered by lidorvn
Price: $90.00
3 used & new from $85.96

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I should rate it ONE, June 22, 2005
I've used Quicken for years and Bragged that I write all my checks with the program. Then I got 2005, and my bank got bought out. Now, I've jumped through all the hoops, called both Quicken and my bank, been to my bank twice personally, and can't get sny psssword to work that will satisy both Quicken and the bank. (They use different ones.) It looks like I'm going to have to go back to paper checks.

Still not solved, and to say I'm frustrated is the understatement of the year. Try ro find "customer support."

I wish I could get them on the same page. I could dictate a password. They want you to change passwords frequently!! HOW, for God's sake!


Fire Lover
Fire Lover
by Joseph Wambaugh
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.99
133 used & new from $0.01

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Non-fiction. Very well written story of a fire-bug, December 6, 2004
This review is from: Fire Lover (Mass Market Paperback)
This is the story of perhaps the most prolific fire-bug in the history of the United States, John Leonard Orr, who is now serving a life sentence without possibility of parole, in the U.S. Penitentiary at Lompoc, California, where in due time he will be transferred to the California State system.

The story leads the reader through Orr's life as a reject from LA Law Enforcement, a failed LA Fire Dept. academy starter, to the acceptance by Glendale Fire Dept., a much lower-paid position, where over a period of years he became a Captain/Arson Investigator.

As an avocation, the Fire Captain, sworn to protect the public from fires, was starting them by the hundreds, and then grabbing attention by solving "How" they were started. He seemed to have an intuitive grasp of where to find the points of origin, and the incendiary devices.

Orr was a copy "wannabe," who tried constantly to impress the police with his acuity and bravery, effecting arrests (although it was not his job). He carried guns in the shower. But he was all a sham.

Eventually, Orr was caught, of course, and tried, and convicted. The evidence against him was as damning as in the O.J. Simpson case, but there was no race card to throw in, and no jury nullification factor.

He caused the deaths of a least four, and perhaps five people, in one fire at Ole's Dept. store, and he wrote a supposedly fiction book, which reads like a very poorly written diary, and the contents of which were damning and led to his conviction.

Orr thought he was smater than anyone else, but his own big mouth and braggadocio was his ulitimate dowlfall.

I ordered this book and Orr's own "masterpiece", Points of Origin, after watching a presentation by Court TV. He will not profit from his writing, as it goes to restitution, but even if he did, if the quality of his writing talent has anything to do with it, he'll die penniless.

Joseph Wambaugh, on the other hand, is a wonderful craftsman, also from the LA Police Dept., where he was a detective sergeant. In addition to this book, he wrote The Onion Field, The Blooding, and The Choirboys.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre, Retired

Oregon Dept. of Corrections


Flying Blind: How Political Correctness Continues to Compromise Airline Safety Post 9/11
Flying Blind: How Political Correctness Continues to Compromise Airline Safety Post 9/11
by Michael A. Smerconish
Edition: Hardcover
121 used & new from $0.01

18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An eyebrow raiser!, November 24, 2004
This is quite a book, describing the effect of political correctness on our national security. Almost unbelievable!

Fact: In early 1942, then-Governor of California, Earl Warren, who eventually became Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, with the collusion of President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt (D), had all of the Japanese/American residents on the Pacific Coast and Hawaii, including U.S. Citizens, interred in what can only be accurately described as "concentration camps." Their property, in most cases, was confiscated and sold, including prime agricultural land.

The reason?: It was thought that they represented a threat, and the U.S. government was fanning racial hatred in time of war against our enemy. We have since paid token reparations on an individual basis, a couple generations and many ruined lives later.

How things have changed!

Today, we are at war with Islamic Fundamentalist Terrorists. In 1979, the U.S. Embassy in Iran was attacked by young Muslim Male extremists mostly between the ages of 17-40.

In 1983, the U.S. Marine baracks in Beirut was blown up by young Muslim Male extremists mostly between the ages of 17-40.

in 1985 the cruise ship Achille Lauro was hijacked and a 70-year-old American passenger in a wheelcair was killed and thrown overboard by young Muslim Male extremists mostly between the ages of 17-40.

In 1988, Pan Am flight 103 was bombed over Scotland by young Muslim Male extremists mostly between the ages of 17-40.

On October 12, 2000, 17 U.S. Sailors lost their lives on the U.S.S. Cole, bombed by young Muslim Male extremists mostly between the ages of 17-40.

On September 11, 2001. four airliners were highjacked and flown into the World Trade Center and Pentagon by young Muslim Male extremists mostly between the ages of 17-40.

In December, 2001, a young Muslim male extremist tried to light a shoe bomb on a commercial jetliner.

In 2002, reporter Daniel Pearl was kidnapped on murdered by young Muslim Male extremists mostly between the ages of 17-40.

Since then, the scenario has been much repeated, with captives, including a woman humanitarian worker, in Iraq, being shot and beheaded, etc. The culprits, as you can see, are not hard to identify in this country, when they venture here to do their mischief.

But this author tells us that if more than two members of the same ethnic group, or who appear to be of the same ethnic group, are stopped at the airline for secondary screening, the airline will be fined for "profiling." If, for example, you have four or five young Muslim Males mostly between the ages of 17-40, you may only stop two of them for further searching or questioning, or be fined for profiling.

The world has changed, but not for the better.

If police are aware that cocaine smuggling in South Florida is being carried out massively, and that 90 percent of the traffickers are black males in new, big shiny black Cadillacs, who would you expect them to keep an eye out for on the highway?

But, they can't single them out. That would be profiling.

Has the country gone nuts, or what?

That is this author's question.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre

author of Handguns and Freedom...their care and maintenance

and other books


Points of Origin: Playing With Fire
Points of Origin: Playing With Fire
by John L. Orr
Edition: Paperback
19 used & new from $109.84

10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Written by a firebug, November 20, 2004
This book was written by a convicted firebug, who was a fire inspector for the Glendale, California, Fire Department. The manuscript was found in his belongings after he was apprehended, during a search of his home, on a search warrant.

The story was on the A&E Channel, describing many of the fires he set. Some were in buildings, and in one, children died. Not a paragon of virtue. Although the book is supposed to be fiction, it is patterned after actual facts as only he knew the details. He often astounded members of his department with his deductions on how the fires started; but he was not brilliant. He had first hand knowledge.

The proceeds of the sale go to remuneration of the damages his victims suffered, as is common on books by criminals. A book by Joseph Wambaugh is a good companion to this one, if you want to look into a sick mind.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre

author of Handguns and Freedom...their care and maintenance

and other books
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 17, 2013 1:11 PM PST


Diving The Seamount
Diving The Seamount
by Tom Rapko
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.03
34 used & new from $1.19

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and insightful, November 18, 2004
This review is from: Diving The Seamount (Paperback)
This is a good little (130 page) book. It could have used the publisher's offered editing service, though. There are many instances of the use of an obviously wrong word. Nothing, however that seriously detracted from the story.

The cover photo was outstanding, and because of the half-dozen hammerhead sharks shown, I must assume that it was shot by the author, who claims to be a photog.

Frankly, I was hoping for a non-fiction book about diving, replete with many underwater photos. The Sea of Cortez is a renowned diving area, and Ray Cannon's book, The Sea of Cortez, is an example of what can be done with such a book.

This is a good first book for a young author who obviously loves diving.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre


Walking with the Saint: Spiritual Practices & Insights To Enhance Your Journey Through Life
Walking with the Saint: Spiritual Practices & Insights To Enhance Your Journey Through Life
by Mary Anne Ayer
Edition: Paperback
66 used & new from $0.01

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I am conflicted about this book, November 14, 2004
Generally I am appreciative of books in this genre, dealing autobiographically with an author's spiritual quest. I know such books are difficult to write, and to express a spiritual journey in language that resonates with an audience. If it is a lay audience (ordinary people without a background in specialized jargon), then it becomes necessary to, somehow, find words that will express mental processes that are, finally, inexpressible. And, of course, all books involve primarily mental processes.

On the other hand, if the expected audience is composed of people sophisticated in what some call "new age" jargon, using Hindi terms like 'chakra,' 'Sat Guru,' and esoteric ideas such as 'Etheric Body,' and oneness with God ("Tat Tvam Asi,") then such a book can be compared to 'preaching to the choir,' which is usually not very enlightening. That is, NEW light is rarely shed.

I know how difficult it is, because I tried to write a small book describing my own non-Christian 'religious experience.' The book was The Road to Damascus: Our Journey Through Eternity.

In it, I tried to describe my own experience. Critics reviewed the book unfavorably, as trite, a Christian apologia (although even a cursory examination showed otherwise), shedding no new light, while I was trying to describe the most earth-shaking experience of my life as honestly as possible. I've since concluded that trying to write such a book is probably a mistake. One cannot describe the indescribable.

So, I hesitate to criticize Ms. Ayer's effort, here. But, I find nothing new. Nothing that the Vedas and the New Testament have not already adequately stated; adequate, that is, for those who can hear the message.

I do sense a confused woman, here. Maybe I'm wrong. But, she seems unable to decide whether she is a Christian, or a Hindu. Though the two religions have some common points, there are marked differences. Christians believe that Christ was the ONLY son of God. Hindus believe that we are all aspects ('sons'?) of God. That the individual soul is not different than the soul of God. And, there are certainly some points which she accepts unquestioningly, from the New Testament, which even a cursory study of the history of the beginnings of that document--specifically the historical doings of the Council of Nicaea--will cast in doubt: evidence of editing, additions, subtractioons, changes of meaning and WHOLLY INVENTED parts of what became the canon of scripture now generally accepted. A frank attempt by Costantine's scholars to reduce the various factions of Christianity to a single, cohesive belief system. An endeavor that was certainly successful, though--at what price?

There are a great many homilies used here from a variety of sources, including Hindus, Christians, and "Saints." I am somewhat put off by the whole concept of Saints, Avatars, and Bodhisatvas. One quote she has, though, meets with my total approval:

Those who know, don't speak;

Those who speak, don't know.

There is a photograph of the author on the back cover. It shows a woman iof indeterminate age, with apparently bleached blonde hair and much eye-makeup, with an expensive white turtle neck garment. I do not mean to be hyper-critical, but this is not the image of an ascetic. Perhaps, like all of us, she is simply trying to look her best. She is very attractive.

This is a good book, with much to recommend it. The quotations alone, that it incorporates will be worth the reading. It obviously represents a great deal of effort. How much original insight it incorporates is for each of us to judge. Any thought that you have not encountered before, is new to you. I recommend the book to you, although I cannot endorse it without more personal knowledge of the author.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre

author of The Road to Damascus: Our Journey Through Eternity

and other books


The Master Sniper
The Master Sniper
by Stephen Hunter
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.99
221 used & new from $0.01

19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War in the Pacific is not the only theater he wrote about, November 10, 2004
This is not another Bob Lee Swagger tale, although it is about a sniper. Not a Marine Corps sniper, but a Wermacht sniper, in the last days of World War II. Apparently, Stephen Hunter likes to "reach out and touch someone" in his stories. He does a lot of stories based on snipers.

Hunter, by the way, spent his military service in the Army, not the Marine Corps. His bio does not discuss his Army experience, but he has encyclopedic knowledge about firearms, and if he makes a statement about a given model of firearm, or its ballistics, you can bet that he's done his research. He's done a lot of reading on the subject, but how much experience he has, again, is a questionmark. Not, I think, a competitive shooter.

This tale looks at the Office of Strategic Services (reinvented as the CIA) of "Wild Bill" Donovan during WWII, (much like Claire Chennault's Civil Air Transpory was reborn as Air America, the CIA outfit) and the Brit intelligence apparatus, for part of its setting. I was interested to see, again, a reference to Ernest Hemingway--not too flattering. He was also in Hunter's novel, Havana--drunk there, too. I wonder what Hunter has against Papa? Apparently just doesn't like him. I always did.

Another theme in this book is a strong current of sympathy for the Jewish people--not that they didn't deserve it, but I have noticed in Hunter's other books an almost obsessiveness about showing how badly treated were the blacks in the old South. He does seem to get caught up in these matters, a champion of the "underdog", although he uses variations on the "n-word" freely throughout all of his books, and I've read several of them.

These are not just fault-finding comments. Stephen Hunter is currently my favorite author in his genre, as I've said before. He's a wonderful storyteller. But, I think I've accurately detected both his political bent and his agenda, if he has one besides simply writing great stories. He's that rarity, a liberal who knows something about firearms, and may even be infatuated with them. I wish him well, and hope he continues to write great novels to a ripe old age.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre, USN (Ret)

author of Handguns and Freedom...their care and maintenance

and other books
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 15, 2010 12:48 PM PDT


Hot Springs (Earl Swagger Novels)
Hot Springs (Earl Swagger Novels)
by Stephen Hunter
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
189 used & new from $0.01

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Veterans' Revolt of 1946, in Hot Springs, Ark., November 9, 2004
Loosely based on an actual historical event, when returning World War II vets decided to clean up the corrupt cesspool that was Hot Springs, Arkansas, Stephen Hunter freely admits that he has taken great liberties with history. But when there is a conflict between a cool plot twist and history, as Hunter declares, the former will always win. He is a storyteller first, last, and always.

Hunter is a good storyteller partly because he spends considerable time researching his details in order to get things right, and make his stories plausible. Good fiction must be plausible. In this effort he has done his usual fine job, using books and experts to make certain that his details fall together on such things as the firearms he introduces (the Thompson submachine gun, for example, as well as combat enhanced .45 model 1911A1 Colt government model, and other weapons). He names some of his resources in the Acknowledgement chaper of the book.

One place where he apparently lacked adequate research though, was in describing a sailboat, where, no doubt he thought he could "wing it" with what knowledge he thought he had. Such tiny details trip up many an author who tries to spin a yarn about something he has no knowledge of, making a fine writer and careful researcher like Hunter stand out from the rest. And, he certainly does.

The detail? A "sheet" is not a sail. It is a rope. Some insist on calling it a "line." Its purpose is to control a sail.

Hunter uses the word to indicate the number of sails the boat will spread. He might better have indicated them by name, for presumably the boat was speading its jib, main, and mizzen, assuming that it was a ketch or yawl (not clarified). And, Stephen, there is no "twenty-two bells." On a 24 hour clock, 2200 is ten PM. There are only eight bells, which are sounded, incrementally, a half-hour apart, and then at the sounding of eight bells, it begins again with one bell.

Hunter apparently, judging from the speeches he puts in his protagonists mouth, doesn't like swabbies, and this is swabby language. But, remember this, The Marine Corps is part of the Navy, and any boot Marine should know the significance of the bell system of watch-keeping.

But, like Ruash Limbaugh would say, "Just kidding! Just Kidding!"

Stephen Hunter writes a helluva book, even if, as I suspect, he is really a bleeding heart liberal Democrat. He's currently my favorite fiction writer.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre, USN (Ret)

author of Handguns and Freedom...their care and maintenance

and other books


Violent Screen: A Critic's 13 Years on the Front Lines of Movie Mayhem (Expedition Series)
Violent Screen: A Critic's 13 Years on the Front Lines of Movie Mayhem (Expedition Series)
by Stephen Hunter
Edition: Paperback
Price: $17.90
58 used & new from $1.15

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A favorite author of thrillers is a movie critic, November 9, 2004
I've read many of Stephen Hunter's novels, and have some more yet to read. This book, Violent Screen, intrigued me by its title because I have long noted that Hollywood, populated as it is with a preponderance of liberal, anti-gun, anti-violence sob sisters, cannot seem to make a movie without featuring gun violence, homicidal car chases, and other socially unacceptable action on a grand scale.

The average citizen of the United States has never, WILL never, in a normal lifetime, be witness, even once, to most of the violent acts that, if you judge our society by what Hollywood portrays, is a normal daily occurrence on our streets.

The so-called "Wild West," for example, depicted by Hollywood, with its stand-up quick-draw shoot-outs, is the product of the fevered imaginations of screenwriters and Eastern pulp fiction purveyors. If the truth were known, Eastern cities were far more violent than the Western villages of the nineteenth century.

But, Stephen Hunter is not judgmental about such things. His appreciation for their product goes beyond such judgments. His criticism is of their craft, not their agenda. Perhaps that is as it should be.

Despite the fact that his novels show evidence of a writer with encyclopedic knowledge of firearms, and it is evident that he is a shooter, which he himself confesses, his movie reviews show a different man: one who is sensitive to the feminist cause, and a sensitive portrayal of the "alternate life-style." While his novels, particularly the Bob Lee Swagger series, are filled with violence, crude language, torture, and denigrating racial depictions, in Violent Screen another writer emerges: a thoughtful, careful thinker whose sensitivities are subtle and nuanced.

There is no doubt that Stephen Hunter is a skilled writer, with an extraordinary vocabulary, and a wonderful ability to tell a story that holds you entranced. What this book shows me is that he is also a man I'd like to know. He is a critical thinker of the first rank, whose opinions I can respect.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre, USN (Ret)

author of Handguns and Freedom...their care and maintenance

and other books


Pale Horse Coming
Pale Horse Coming
by Stephen Hunter
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: $7.99
182 used & new from $0.01

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, he uses real people in his tale!, November 9, 2004
Shooters who have read their work will recognize the real gun writers that Stephen Hunter patterns some of his characters after in this tale. Most are dead now, and at least one escapes me. Elmer Keith, Bill Jordan, Jack O'Connor, Ed McGivern, well-known gun writers and experts all, and Audie Murphy, actor and decorated warrior, are easily recognized by their physical descriptions, as well as the false names assigned to them, and in many cases their real-life predilections and stomping grounds fit the bill.

The character known as "Charlie" escapes me, but given his loud-mouthed bragging about how many men he has killed, I doubt that he is based on any real person at all. He does not fit anyone with whom I am familiar, and so I suspect that he is pure Hunter fiction. If not, he is lawsuit bait, and I hope I never meet his real-life counterpart.

This is another fine action thriller by Hunter using a couple of his protagonists from other stories, Earl Swagger, an Arkansas Marine, fresh out of WWII, and Sam Vincent, a former State Prosecutor.

This story, a little different from Hunter's usual fare, develops the old Yankee theme about the abysmal cruelties suffered by blacks in the deep South; in this case, Mississippi. Like most such tales, it is considerably overdrawn, and in fact a caricature of the real South, in which, in fact, I, an Oregonian, lived for a couple of years in the mid-'thirties. (By the way, Mr. Hunter, an accurate colloquial rendition of New Orleans in the local patois is more like Nyaw'luns, than the N'Awleens you seem to favor in this book, at least as I remember it from my youth).

I am awed by Stephen Hunter's genius when it comes to spinning a tale. Usually he does not let political correctness intrude and spoil the story. In this case he comes close, but the story survives. He knows more about firearms than the average fiction writer. Whether his knowledge is simply derived from reading gun magazines, or whether from some actual experience with firearms, it is difficult to tell. As for his knowledge of prisons and prison routine, I can tell you he has a lot to learn, speaking from twenty years experience on the subject.

What he describes here is a caricature about as accurate as a political cartoon compared to reality, even in the deep South of the 'thirties, where I saw my first chain gang working on a highway shoulder with balls and chains on their ankles under the shotgun of a cracker guard. But, this is a common fault of screenwriters as well. Most prison movies (Cool Hand Luke, The Longest Yard, The Shawshank Redemption, Escape From Alcatraz, etc., etc.), where the American public gets most of its information about prisons, unfortunately, tend to show the inmates as poor, misunderstood, or even innocent victims of the brutal "guards." It is disheartening to the men who work the toughest beat in law-enforcement to see themselves portrayed thus year after year, by Hollywood's mythmakers.

But, in this story at least. it all comes under the heading of "poetic license." There can be no doubt that Stephen Hunter is an exceptionally fine writer in his genre, who holds his audience spellbound. I love to read his stories, and hope he writes many more and lives a long, highly productive, successful life. I'm not even miffed by his cracks about the Navy (from Earl Swagger's mouth). I served with the Marines (TAD) for a year in China, even wore their uniform, and have great respect for them, myself.

Joseph (Joe) Pierre, USN (Ret)
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 14, 2009 4:19 PM PDT


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