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Nikki's Secret
Nikki's Secret
Price: $4.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Fails to deliver, March 24, 2014
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This review is from: Nikki's Secret (Kindle Edition)
Generally I don't review a book that I dislike, but in this case I have to make an exception. Very rarely would I stop reading a novel when I'm 80% finished, but I did so in this case. Although this novel held the promise of being a good read based on the projected story line and that it was a realitively lengthy tale with a titilating cover, it failed to deliver miserably. The plot concerns a transgender woman living in stealth who happens to be a high school teacher. Naturally, her background is going to be discovered and the novel is about that aspect of her life. That's the redeeming part.

What I couldn't stomach was all the gratuitous and almost arbitrarily placed sex. Our heroine Nikki happens to be married to two, yes TWO men! The "steamy" scenes occur all too frequentlly amd seem to come out of nowhere, serving to act as filler to prolong the agony of this book and redirect it away from the plot. It feels as though there are two books intertwined that just don't belong together.

You also have a spate of extremely prejudiced, over-the-top characters...police, parents and others, who are not just bigots, almost all of them insist on calling our ostensibly very feminine protagonist "Mr." and referring to her as male. This comes across as an almost laughable parody of the prejudicial behavior of society. Of course there is such a thing as discrimination, but this stuff is so overt it borders on ridiculous. Then again, "ridiculous" is the watchword for this novel.


Era of a New Dawn (Boyz2Gurlz)
Era of a New Dawn (Boyz2Gurlz)
Price: $2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Top notch!, March 18, 2014
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Era of a New Dawn (Boyz2Gurlz) by Dawn Marie is a very accurately described and readable tale. It’s about a young man with secret cross dressing proclivities and very little direction to his life. Our protagonist receives a ticket to attend a female impersonator stage show. He soon learns that whoever got him there had something else in mind. His presence at this event turns out to be a set up as he is "identified" as a potential guest drag performer and virtually goaded to go on stage "en femme." Behind the scenes and under the skillful guidance of a crew of talented makeover artists, he is quickly transformed into an authentic looking showgirl. What he doesn't know, but will soon find out is that his secret feminine yearnings were known all along to this top-notch troupe of drag performers. It turns out that one of these players is about to have a sex change operation and because of this, can no longer be considered a bonafide member of the group. Our unwitting protagonist Darwin has been "selected" because of his feminine characteristics since the contract of the “about-to-be-changed” performer calls for her to replace herself if she no longer has her original parts intact. Will Darwin agree to journey down this path and join the troupe and does he have what it takes to become a top notch drag entertainer? And if he goes this route, how far will it take him? One can only imagine what future feminization and eventual love lies in store for Darwin, as he soon becomes the lovely Dawn.


The Private Secretary
The Private Secretary
Price: $3.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Totally enjoyable, March 5, 2014
A very sexy and enthralling novel about the feminization of a rather naive young man. The author is an excellent and gifted writer who has a knack for tantilizing the reader as her main progonists slip with ever increasing ecstacy, further and further down the bunny hole.


The World Turned Upside Down
The World Turned Upside Down
Price: $7.50

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fine historical gender novel, March 2, 2014
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"The World Turned Upside Down," by HW Coyle is a really unique, wonderful and well-written historical novel set in the context of a serendipitous gender transformation. It is also a novel about the rights of women, betrayal, bargaining chips, expert negotiations and military strategy.

As the story unfolds, a series of tragic events virtually forces the male-born main character into a female gender role, a seamless transformation accomplished in a most unusual and creative manner. Unlike most gender change novels, the main protagonist is not motivated by dysphoric feelings or the emergence of the female persona of an intersex infant mislabeled at birth. There is no divine intervention or magic spell at work, only a confluence of unusual events playing out and resulting in a heroic decision on the part of our hero/heroine. What happens afterwards is somewhat reflective of a Shakespearean tragedy where individuals are trapped in the web of great events and can never extract themselves.

In addition to the unique gender transformation aspect and the wonderful characterizations that the author brings to life in most realistic fashion, Coyle has us meet some of the great figures in American and British history. The novelist obviously did her research on the subject and displays a wonderful knowledge of the politics, battles, key figures and logistics of the American Revolution. I particularly enjoyed her vivid descriptions of New York City as it was back then, replete with references to the "Village of Greenwich" (now, of course called Greenwich Village).

I found it extremely interesting and quite moving to look back some 250 years to the founding and the raison d'être for the United States of America. It makes one think of the way things were back then and at other times when patriots rallied together for a common cause. It gives one pause to see how we have veered off our original mission so dramatically and how special interest groups have nearly immobilized and brought the political process of the United States to its knees. This begs the question, "Is it only all-out war against a common enemy that unites our feelings for the common good?" But, that is just an aside. Buy this book. I found it well worth the money!


Changed into an Asian Schoolgirl
Changed into an Asian Schoolgirl
Price: $2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Cop killer gets his due, February 21, 2014
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Mindi Flyth is a master of erotic transgender fiction and “Changed into an Asian Schoolgirl” is a wonderful and vivid example of her dark writings in this genre. Presenting a story that takes place a bit into the future, a cop killer on death row is offered a special deal by the criminal justice system. Given the option of execution or receiving freedom after undergoing a special medical experiment that will transform him into a female, our nasty protagonist opts for the later. It sounds crazy, he thinks, but with just three weeks from the gas chamber, anything is better than dying. Our racist criminal Mike soon becomes Michelle, now in the body of an 18 year-old Asian schoolgirl.

Change is not easy though and Mike fights his transformation every step of the way. Then, as his defenses begin to crumble, slowly and inexorably he comes to the realization that they must have brainwashed him to accept this. In addition to his body transformation, it begins to dawn on him they had done something to his mind so it actually felt good. But, there was still a little part of Mike left inside that had to fight it. That “Mike part” couldn't actually enjoy this awful thing they were doing to him, or could he?

I’ll leave it to the reader to learn what happened, but as the author asks somewhat rhetorically, “Wouldn’t being a happy girl be so much better than being an angry man?”


Harem
Harem
Price: $2.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing little book, February 20, 2014
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This review is from: Harem (Kindle Edition)
Page for page this novella is one of the sexiest gender transformation works you will ever read. The author is a fine craftsman who clearly takes great pride in his writing. In "Harem," he has produced an extremely well-written, balanced and harmonious descent (or perhaps really an ascent) into female servitude. If you're into this genre, you will love it!


Killing Me Slowly
Killing Me Slowly
Price: $3.49

5.0 out of 5 stars I have to add my two cents..., February 19, 2014
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This review is from: Killing Me Slowly (Kindle Edition)
I think that this book stands out as the best work of this wonderful author. It's the story about a young British Royal Marine, a combat-hardened chap, who as a child prayed to God to change him into a girl. As luck would have it, one day because of circumstances beyond his control, he finally gets his wish. This occurs in a most unusual, though somehow plausible manner. The story offers great character development and a glimpse of some rather touching relationships of the key character. One in particular that stands out and perhaps will move the reader is the interaction with the father of this very special person. The novel has lots of positives going for it. But the most powerful and eloquent part of this book is the protagonist's own acceptance of the female gender role that is thrust upon him. This is done in such a sensitive way that the reader will be astounded at the ease and grace that a male born person can embrace and have a female gender role become completely natural and without shame.


OEM: An FtM/MtF romance
OEM: An FtM/MtF romance
Price: $3.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting and sexy, February 13, 2014
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Here's a little book that just keeps building in intensity as two sweet people slowly but surely come to grips with their gender variance. A very interesting plot in which a bet between two friends becomes so much more than just a friendly wager. As the story unfolds and the real character of the protagonists begin to emerge, the story deepens and keeps getting better and better until it peaks at just the right moment. Another fine work by a masterful writer of the tg genre.


Becoming a Woman: A Biography of Christine Jorgensen (Sexual Minorities in Historical Context)
Becoming a Woman: A Biography of Christine Jorgensen (Sexual Minorities in Historical Context)
Price: $22.52

4.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading, February 7, 2014
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No study on the subject of gender dysphoria could be complete without referencing the account of the transsexual whose sex change shocked America in the early 1950s. Christine Jorgensen in her memoir, "Christine Jorgensen, a Personal Autobiography (1967)," outlined her journey from George to Christine. Jorgensen was one of the first individuals of the modern era to undergo what was in the 1950s commonly termed a "sex change operation." "GI Turned Blond Beauty," screamed the headline of the New York Daily News in December 1952. On the cover of the paper was a photo of an attractive young woman waving to the cameras as she exited a transatlantic flight in New York. While in Denmark, she had undergone a radical and experimental operation to turn her into a woman. The story went on to describe the history and process of how the former Army private George Jorgensen was transformed into Christine.

From a young age the article described, George had felt as if he was really a "female trapped in a male body." Unable to repress these disturbing feelings or compensate for them any longer, he obtained medical help and began hormone therapy. On the advice of friends, he traveled to Copenhagen where he met Dr. Christian Hamburger. What Dr. Hamburger learned in his examination and subsequent interviews with his patient eventually led him to perform the surgery that transformed George into Christine. The Christine Jorgensen story told a tale of overcoming the shame of the "abnormality" of having been born in the wrong body. It provided an inspiration for many mid-20th Century gender dysphoria suffers and a legacy that continues to today. What would it mean to be actually able do something about a problem of this magnitude? Christine Jorgensen had placed the importance of her own personal happiness above all else. From what depths did such tremendous courage flow? In the Christine Jorgensen account, gender dysphoric boys heard the word "transsexual" for the first time. In so doing, many found a niche, an explanation, a hope for the future and a direction.

"Becoming a Woman: A Biography of Christine Jorgenson," by Richard F. Docter, PhD is a book I had long wanted to read. However, I had not done so because I thought it to be too pricey. When I became aware that it could be "rented" for a short time at a fraction of the selling price, I downloaded it immediately. After all, it is now about 62 years since Christine made those newspaper headlines for her gender transition and she remains a legend, role model and a seminal figure to the transgender community. When you think about it, the ground she broke in her 1952 transition from a male to female gender role has significantly impacted all of us, not just those of us who are transgender. It stands as an amazing tale describing how a single event has forever changed our world view concerning sex, gender roles and the bi-gender system. The impact of what Christine did back then continues to evolve, and like the ripples in a pond, will go on and on. For as long as there is a bi-gender system and there are people who from an early age, have the idea or thought that they were born in the wrong body, there will be gender dysphoria.

On balance I found the Docter biography to be a worthwhile and well-researched read that brought me back to the 1950's and my first realization that one need not remain categorized in the wrong sex for the rest of their life. And although this account provided a good amount of interesting and missing information about the life of Christine Jorgenson, it was not without its faults. There was a tendency to provide excessive and unimportant information to the reader. The author also gave way too much data about some meaningless things such as sales receipts and income statements, and did so in the minutest detail. I thought that such areas could have easily been condensed and his points made more concisely. Although extremely well researched, this biography also had a propensity toward redundancy. Refreshingly though, I found it to be nicely proofread and relative free of grammatical mistakes. Because of my interest in Christine's story, I stuck with it to the end and I'm glad that I did. However, the repetition and fixation on triviality left me with the weird sensation that the author might have been paid by the page. I know this couldn't be true, but the feeling was reinforced when I noticed that the last 30% was devoted to footnoting and bibliography. Lastly, and probably in part because of Christine's own secretiveness, this work left more questions unanswered than it answered. It's not the author's fault, but we probably will never know about many of the intimate parts of Christine's life. There were many hypotheses and projections drawn about her motivations, possible love interests and other areas of behavior, but because of the dearth of available facts, not many definitive conclusions can be formulated, although the author made some valiant attempts to try.

One thing that emerges clearly from this book is that Christine, in addition to grappling with her gender identity issues, was also consumed by the excesses of substance abuse through alcohol and nicotine addiction. Her self-destructive behavior in this area, her propensity toward poor decision making, her variable and volatile mood swings, her fixation on friending the great and the near great and her willingness to cut people off at the knees if she felt even slightly betrayed or disagreed with, begs the question, "was she also driven by some other overriding issue such as Narcissism or Borderline Personality Disorder?" We may never know, but the fact remains that Christine Jorgensen's impact and legacy will endure.


A rough kind of justice
A rough kind of justice
Price: $6.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cautionary Tale, February 6, 2014
Set in the not too far distant future and using a very interesting premise, "A Rough Kind of Justice" by Janet Nicola James addresses the issue of how society and the criminal justice system may sometime evolve to keep pace with an increasingly violent and sexually predatory population. When Paul, a 30-something heterosexual male who lives life in the fast lane is accused of the rape of a minor, a cascade of events is set in motion that changes his life forever. Paul, who is not entirely without culpability, soon becomes a victim of his own excesses and the malpractice and dishonesty of the medical and judicial system.

It won't give away much and will surely whet the appetite of any prospective reader of this genre to learn that through the negligence of the Penal System (pun intended) Paul has his private parts completely amputated. Through a confluence of sad events he quickly transforms into someone only vaguely resembling his former self and in the process he also becomes a highly sympathetic and likeable character. Paul is then sent to a Woman's prison because where else would you send a convicted felon in such a condition? The novel goes on to outline how Paul, now with no testosterone in his system, begins a feminization process and turns his life around. At first glance it appears that at least Paul has landed in a model female community, albeit it a prison. However, for our changeling protagonist, now known as Paula, this soon turns into a nightmarish experience, the only positive result being that he eventually comes to terms with his true self. And that's not such a bad thing, I guess.


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