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Robert C. Rogers "Robert C. Rogers" RSS Feed (Hattiesburg, Mississippi USA)

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Spanish Civil War - History of a Battle for Europe's Soul - Spain's Great War (Required History)
Spanish Civil War - History of a Battle for Europe's Soul - Spain's Great War (Required History)
Price: $2.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Would be a useful high school textbook, October 13, 2014
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It had the basic information, and is a useful history text for the high school level. However, the writing did not flow that well, and it read more like an outline than a narrative. Nevertheless, the text did a thorough job of covering the causes and effects of the Spanish Civil War. It was particularly insightful in helping the reader see what factors cause a nation to have a Civil War.


Rooms: A Novel
Rooms: A Novel
by James L. Rubart
Edition: Audio CD
Price: $20.98
33 used & new from $13.99

4.0 out of 5 stars pain, romance, suffering, novel, Christian, forgiveness, August 24, 2014
This review is from: Rooms: A Novel (Audio CD)
Rooms by James Rubart is a Christian novel about a wealthy young Seattle software developer who gets a cryptic note saying that he has inherited a house on the Oregon coast from an uncle he doesn't remember. When he goes to claim his house, he finds that he has inherited a house with weird rooms that God is using to change his life.
Some people have compared this book to The Shack, since both books call a man to a house and force him to deal with the pain of his past. However, there are many differences between the two books. Rubart is a more experienced and better writer. He uses vivid descriptions that paint a clear picture of the characters and events. Rubart does not delve into any questionable theological teachings, the way the author of The Shack does. However, The Shack is more emotionally satisfying as an answer to the problem of suffering. Rooms deals with pain, forgiveness, and includes a good romantic story, but it reads more like a science fiction novel, and for some reason, I found it harder to suspend belief and accept the alternate lives and time travel that takes place in the novel. Rooms is also very long, but I'm glad I stayed with it to the end, as the plot picks up pace, and comes to a fascinating and satisfying conclusion.


Century Series I Men's Bike , Large
Century Series I Men's Bike , Large
Offered by Peak 1 Sports

5.0 out of 5 stars Great product and great service!, July 22, 2014
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This review is from: Century Series I Men's Bike Jersey
I am very pleased with this jersey. It is great for riding in the hot summer weather here in south Mississippi, because it is sleeveless and made of material that breathes. I also like the highly visible color and stylish design. And it zips all the way down. I made the mistake of ordering a Large and had to exchange it for an Extra Large (I normally wear a large shirt, so the size seems to run small), but the distributor was very cooperative and prompt in exchanging my jersey for the right size. Thanks for the great product and great service!


Dead Lawyers Tell No Tales
Dead Lawyers Tell No Tales
Price: $9.39

5.0 out of 5 stars Better than John Grisham, July 21, 2014
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If you like John Grisham, you will probably like Randy Singer. I have read many of Singer's legal suspense novels, and I found his plot twists to be consistently good, often better than Grisham. Singer is a Christian writer who avoids profanity and has a Christian worldview to his books. As a Christian myself, I really like that. But if you are not a Christian, don't let that put you off, especially in Dead Lawyers Tell No Tales. Although his previous novels are not "preachy," this novel is even less so. Singer simply weaves a captivating story of redemption. Landon Reed, a former SEC football quarterback who went to jail for taking a bribe to throw a game, wants to redeem himself by becoming a lawyer and helping others. He is an imperfect man who nearly falls again, and then gets caught up in a law firm where somebody is slowly killing every lawyer at the firm.

From beginning to end the plot kept my interest. Each short chapter seemed to end with something that made me want to read the next chapter and learn how the plot would resolve. Singer is a lawyer himself, and is able to describe complicated legal situations in with clarity and detail. But what made this story engrossing in the first half was the theme of forgiveness and a second chance. In the second half, the plot accelerated and I couldn't put down the book until I finished. This is probably Randy Singer's best book to date.


101 Cartoons
101 Cartoons
by Joe McKeever
Edition: Paperback
Price: $17.39
16 used & new from $10.78

5.0 out of 5 stars Pokes fun at religion and life in general, May 27, 2014
This review is from: 101 Cartoons (Paperback)
Recently, I had the pleasure of enjoying some pancakes with Joe McKeever. When he noticed that the waitress was friendly, he immediately pulled out a pad and pencil, asked her to stand still and smile, and in a few moments he had drawn a wonderful cartoon of her likeness. She was so excited, another waiter came to ask about it, and he gladly drew another one. Everywhere he goes, Joe draws pictures of people. You might say that he's the quickest draw in the West.

McKeever's cartoons were published for years in Pulpit Helps and are still a regular feature in various Baptist newspapers through Baptist Press. Now McKeever has published a great collection of some recent favorites, entitled "101 Cartoons." Each cartoon is a full page, and nearly all are in full color.

McKeever has a corny sense of humor, which I like. He pokes fun at pastors, deacons, pastor search committees, hypocrites in church, seeker-sensitive churches, Calvinism, fickle church members, Facebook, smart phones, politicians, TV, the lottery, sports, health and exercise, among other things. Some of the cartoons make a serious point, such as the one that shows a man in a wheelchair in front of a church with inaccessible steps, who says, "I'll bet this is a real pretty church on the inside."

The print is large and easy to read, and as you can see from the photos, they are very colorful. It makes a great coffee table book for enjoyable conversation with family and visitors.


Redeemed by Fire: The Rise of Popular Christianity in Modern China
Redeemed by Fire: The Rise of Popular Christianity in Modern China
by Xi Lian
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $47.31
42 used & new from $33.32

4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource for understanding Christianity in China today, May 6, 2014
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Most Christians who are interested in missions are aware that Christianity has grown dramatically in modern China, despite persecution by the Communist government. But the story of how Christianity grew and what it looks like today in China remains a mystery to most Western Christians. Lian Xi, a native of China who is now professor of history at Hanover College, lifted that mystery for Western readers in 2010 with his carefully researched book published by Yale University Press, Redeemed by Fire: The Rise of Poplar Christianity in Modern China.

Xi briefly surveys the presence of Christianity in China in ancient times, and then focuses most of the book on Christianity in China in the 19th and 20th centuries. China was forced to sign treaties with Western nations that included official toleration of Christianity after 1858. For the next century, over 23,000 missionaries poured into China from the West, half of them Americans. While this mission effort did contribute to over 623,000 members in mission churches by 1949, it also led to a deep resentment against Christians by most Chinese, who saw it as a religion of foreigners that was forced upon them. This resentment erupted into violence at times, such as the Boxer Rebellion. Xi stresses that Protestant Christianity was able to become truly indigenous under Communist rule, and no longer was seen as a foreign religion. The Communist government unwittingly allowed this to happen, by settting up the officially recognized and state-controlled Three-Self Church. Most Christians rejected the Three-Self Church as guilty of ungodly compromise with the state, and turned instead to a variety of underground church movements.

Xi then follows the stories of several influential indigenous movements among Protestant Christians, including the True Jesus Church, the Bethel Band, the Jesus Family, and the Little Flock, with charismatic leaders like John Sung, Wang Mingdao, and Watchman Nee. Most of these churches held to a fundamentalist faith, a charismatic leader, pre-millennial hope, and a revivalistic, if not Pentecostal, fervor. Some half million Christians died under Communist persecution, but by 2000 there were 15 million Protestants and 5 million Catholics in the official registered churches, and an additional 30 million Protestants and several million Catholics in underground churches.

Westerners tend to idealize the faith of Chinese Christians, but Xi points out that the lack of theological training and isolation from any accountability in underground churches occasionally led to doctrinal heresies and mixtures of Chinese folk religion with Christianity, as well as opening the door to leaders who were dictatorial and sometimes immoral. Despite these shortcomings among the underground churches, Xi credits them with having a powerful appeal by offering hope to the powerless under Communist oppression. Despite the phenomenal growth of Christianity in China, it is still a minority faith in China, and expected to remain a religion of the common people, not a majority faith or a faith of those in influence or power in China.

I found Xi’s research to be thorough and highly informative, but it came across as somewhat aloof and skeptical of genuine faith. He tends to explain away the faith of Chinese Christians in terms of sociological factors. He includes stories of the moral failings of Chinese Christian leaders, but he reports very few of the stories of commitment, martyrdom and persecution suffered by Chinese Christians. Nevertheless, Xi’s research is likely to become a standard resource for any historian or missiologist wishing to understand Christianity in modern China.


When Mountains Weep
When Mountains Weep
Price: $2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Moving account of suffering of Kurds under Saddam Hussein, January 1, 2014
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I have read numerous books about the struggles of the Kurdish people, but this short book is the most powerful one I have read. Mustafa tells the story of a Kurdish boy growing up in the 1990's and 2000's under the persecution of the regime of Saddam Hussein of Iraq. Written in the first person, his account takes the reader through the time of the Iran-Iraq War and the Persian Gulf War, until after the USA establishes a no-fly zone over northern Iraq, known as "Kurdistan." His gripping account helps the reader to understand the poverty and suffering of the Kurdish people, but also reveals their rich culture, courage and determination to have a homeland. While much of the story is heartbreaking, there is also a lot of humor and a deeply emotional love story. As an American reader, I was overcome with emotion when the American soldiers showed up to help the Kurdish refugees in Turkey, but I was also deeply saddened that our nation did not come to their aid sooner. If you want to understand the Kurds, read this book!


The Da Vinci Code: A Novel (Robert Langdon)
The Da Vinci Code: A Novel (Robert Langdon)
Offered by Random House LLC
Price: $5.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Good entertainment; terrible history, December 9, 2013
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It was hard to know how to rate this book. As for quality of writing, it is an exciting page-turner. I'm not surprised that it is a runaway bestseller. However, it is terrible history, full of distortions that are easily disproved by historians. So if you're reading it for pure entertainment, fine. But if you believe this stuff is real, you are naive.


Return to Me
Return to Me
DVD
Price: $2.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Great date movie, December 9, 2013
Loved the movie! Great acting, good mix of humor and romance. Perhaps the plot was a bit predictable, but they pulled it off so well that it was quite enjoyable. Fantastic date movie.


Growing UP: How to Be a Disciple Who Makes Disciples
Growing UP: How to Be a Disciple Who Makes Disciples
by Robby Gallaty
Edition: Paperback
Price: $12.43
53 used & new from $8.41

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book on discipleship by a pastor who is doing it effectively, November 28, 2013
Robby Gallaty’s life was radically changed from drug-dealer to the pastor of a growing church. He credits the transformation not only to his conversion experience, but also to the process of personal discipleship he enjoyed under David Platt and others. His book, Growing Up: How to Be a Disciple Who Makes Disciples, shares his passion for discipleship that he is living out as pastor of Brainerd Baptist Church in Chattanooga, Tennessee.
Gallaty gives a strong Biblical argument for the need for discipleship. The focal point of his book is the suggestion that instead of depending on Sunday School classes to do discipleship, churches should have small, closed discipleship groups with a leader and 3 or 4 other people of the same gender. He uses the name “D-group” for such discipleship groups. He prefers such small groups over discipleship by one-on-one mentors, saying one-on-one mentoring is harder to reproduce and may turn into a counseling relationship instead of a discipleship process. While he gives good reasons for the D-group, he seems to overstate the case that his is the best way. After all, Gallaty himself was mentored one-on-one by David Platt, while Jim Putnam’s book, Real-Life Discipleship, describes some effective discipleship with small groups that are larger than the size that Gallaty suggests.
Nevertheless, Growing Up is a useful resource for church leaders wishing to get serious about discipleship. The book is filled with practical advice about growing in one’s prayer life, Bible study, evangelism, and discipling others. Gallaty is fond of acronyms. The last six chapters of his book form the acronymn for the discipleship process: “CLOSER” which stands for Communicate, Learn, Obey, Store, Evangelize and Renew. He suggests the “HEAR” method of Bible study: Highlight, Explain, Apply and Respond. He says the D-group needs “FAT” belivers: Faithful, Available and Teachable.
While I would argue that D-groups are not the only way to do it, the fact remains that Gallaty is actually leading his church to do something, rather than just talk about it. I would highly recommend Growing Up as a resource that church leaders can use to implement true discipleship in their churches. It is “REAL” (Realistic, Easy to Read, Applicable, and Life-changing).
In the interest of full disclosure, I received a free copy of this book for review, but I was under no obligation to write a positive review.


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