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A Year with Peter Drucker: 52 Weeks of Coaching for Leadership Effectiveness
A Year with Peter Drucker: 52 Weeks of Coaching for Leadership Effectiveness
by Joseph A. Maciariello
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $22.43
82 used & new from $13.01

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pick One: The Weekly or The Daily Drucker, January 6, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I've been in the offices of hundreds of CEOs, leaders and managers over the years, and there's one consistent book I notice: The Daily Drucker: 366 Days of Insight and Motivation for Getting the Right Things Done. While their computers boot up and they're sipping coffee, these effective executives read the one-page insight from Peter Drucker, the father of modern management.

Now, thanks to Joseph A. Maciariello, you have two options: a daily dose of Drucker or a weekly coaching session.

"A Year With Peter Drucker" is hot-off-the-press and is the first-ever book I've recommended that I have not thoroughly read--because I'm going to savor every chapter, slowly and thoughtfully, in 2015. It's a no-brainer pick. The contents:
* 52 short chapters (each week is about five pages)
* BIG IDEA: short introduction
* READ: insights from Drucker's writings
* REFLECT: color commentary revised and updated by Maciariello
* PRACTICUM-PROMPTS: in-the-ribs questions and insights from Maciariello

From the book: "In Week 1, we begin with a consultation Drucker had in early 2002 with senior executives of World Vision International. His subject was `What Do Effective Leaders Do to Create High-Performing Organizations?'"

My favorite Drucker insights from Week 1:
* "The only definition of a leader is someone with followers."
* "When you do it, do it your way, what works for you. Do not try to be anybody else."
* "Leadership is an achievement of trust."

"No two leaders are alike," Peter Drucker said. "Some are very gregarious, some are very aloof, some are charmers, and others are like dead mackerel. Some are communicators, and some praise, and others many never praise. They all have two things in common: they get things done, and you can trust them."

Maciariello asks in his "Practicum-Prompts" for Week 1, "Are you developing leaders in your organization, or are you developing bureaucratic, rule-following functionaries?"

My take-away today:
Let's be honest. Many of us prefer the rule-followers. Perhaps...an over-reliance on rules indicates a culture thin on trust.

Enjoy, and savor, this treasure chest of a book!


3rd Annual Nonprofit Governance Survey
3rd Annual Nonprofit Governance Survey
by Ecfa
Edition: Paperback
Price: $8.84

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Tool for a Board Member Self-Assessment, December 31, 2014
There are a few surprises among the Top 10 Highlights from the executive summary of the ECFA 3rd Annual Nonprofit Governance Survey.

Highlights include board giving, CEO succession, the gap between knowing and doing, operating reserves and measurable goals. Here are the 10:

1. Boards affirm distinctiveness of Christ-centered governance.
There has been a dramatic and encouraging change in board member thinking, over 3 years, about the distinctives between "secular" board governance and "Christ-centered" board governance.

2. Strengths and spiritual gifts: more knowing than doing.
While more than 95% of CEOs, board chairs and board members say it is important to leverage the God-given strengths of every board member, only about 17-21% of boards have completed a strengths assessment. Somewhat more encouraging, 33-44% of board members say they know the spiritual gifts of their board colleagues.

3. Healthy governance: not there yet.
On the governance continuum of "Micromanagement (1) to Healthy (10)," about 35-40% of CEOs and board members rated their boards at 7 or less--but about 90% would like to be at "Healthy Governance" (8, 9 or 10) within 12-18 months.

4. In rating the three aspects of governance, fiduciary governance rated high, but generative governance rated the lowest.
Board members agree that they are very effective in their "Fiduciary Governance" roles, but much less effective in their "Generative Governance" roles--the re-imagining of the organization, in light of trends and opportunities.

5. CEOs and board members agree...
...that all board members should be givers and encourage others to give, but... while a healthy 87% to 91% agree that board members should be annual givers--less than 42% of their organizations provide training to equip and inspire board members on the "how to" of inviting others to give.

6. About one-third have operating reserves of 6 months or more, while up to 84% want at least 3 months of reserves within the next 24 months.
Based on their last fiscal year, 57% or more of survey participants said they had three or more months in operating reserves--and 30% to 33% reported reserves of six months or more.

7. Over one-third of board members recognize they dip into tactical versus strategic issues always or frequently.
Yet overall, CEOs and board members said several unhealthy boardroom habits are usually avoided in their board meetings and/or addressed by the board chair.

8. Majority of board members not prepared for CEO succession.
In response to key questions "every board member must ask," only 30-35% of board chairs and board members (the lowest response of the 13 questions) said they were prepared to name their next CEO.

9. Fundraising continues to be top area needing improvement.
For the third year, CEOs, board chairs and board members were asked to select the Top 5 areas needing the greatest improvement in their ministries. Four areas have remained the same for all three years of the survey.

10. Almost 60% of CEOs and senior staff have annual measurable goals.
Over 85% of CEOs say that donors are interested in mission impact--yet more than one-third of CEOs do not have board-approved CEO annual measurable goals. But good news: 84% of CEOs say their boards understand their role and God's role in goal-setting and kingdom outcomes.

Here's a great way to leverage this survey: Photocopy the 20 "Board Member Self-Assessment" questions (page 60) for your next board meeting. Then ask, "What are the Top 3 areas that need improvement in our board work?"

The book also lists a wide continuum of board resources and books, including one of my favorites: Owning Up: The 14 Questions Every Board Member Needs to Ask.


Wellspring: 31 Days to Whole-Hearted Living (LTI Devotional Series) (Volume 1)
Wellspring: 31 Days to Whole-Hearted Living (LTI Devotional Series) (Volume 1)
by Stephen A. Macchia
Edition: Paperback
Price: $11.69
24 used & new from $9.63

5.0 out of 5 stars 31 Days, 31 Weeks or 31 Staff Meetings to Whole-Heartedness, December 22, 2014
Here's a perfect book for starting the New Year. Steve Macchia's Wellspring: 31 Days to Whole-Hearted Living features 31 very short chapters (one-a-day for a month) on these powerful themes: The Grateful Heart, The Discerning Heart, The Hopeful Heart, The Thoughtful Heart, The Discriminating Heart and 26 more hearts. In the chapter on The Foolish Heart, he writes:

"Fools consider their heart as their own and left to their own devices end up foolishly inconsiderate toward all others. It's almost as if a foolish heart is the ancient term for what we know today as a narcissist."

This would make a short, but poignant, staff meeting study for your weekly or monthly staff meetings. (The best leaders delegate some of their reading to others!)

To go even deeper, read Macchia's excellent book, Crafting a Rule of Life: An Invitation to the Well-Ordered Way.


The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
by Daniel James Brown
Edition: Paperback
Price: $10.20
137 used & new from $6.20

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars MIB! MIB! MIB!, November 28, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Oh, my. How do I describe this book--and the extraordinary value of reading it together with your team? If I write a dull, been-there-read-that review, you might surmise the book is equally dull. It's not!

What if...I bet the farm and predicted that "The Boys in the Boat" will be my 2014 book-of-the-year pick? (Would that get your attention?)

What if...I said this true story of "Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics" included my pick for the most exquisite description--I've ever read--of what a high performance team looks like?

What if...I told you that Bill Butterworth, the author of On the Fly Guide to...Building Successful Teams, wrote me recently after I had reviewed Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption? He noted, "Unbroken is the best book I've read in the last couple of years! Wanna know what comes in at Number Two? It's called The Boys in the Boat. I couldn't put it down. Everybody I've recommended it to hates my guts because they can't put it down once they start it."

Author Daniel James Brown writes narrative nonfiction books and his primary interest as a writer is "in bringing compelling historical events to life as vividly and accurately" as he can. Trust me, he can!

Back before American football owned it all, sports fans in the 1930s (a tough time) embraced university rowing teams with remarkable fanaticism. In Seattle, the lakeshore crowds at the eight-oar crew races between the University of Washington and the University of California at Berkeley rivaled the "12th man" stupor over the NFL Super Bowl champs, the Seattle Seahawks.

What if...I were still leading a team? Here's how I would leverage the power of this book:
--Buy one book (or Kindle version) for each team member--and provide a "read and reflect" learning tool.
--Plan a team-building retreat in the next 30 to 90 days.
--At the retreat, invest time every morning and evening--listening, listening, and more listening as our team talked about "Elements of Teamwork," as described in The Boys in the Boat.
--Enjoy every afternoon in an experiential team-building activity: Rowing (if possible), ropes courses, zip lines, climbing walls, confidence courses, etc.

Really--the insights, the drama, the real life stuff-in-the-trenches, is so, so insightful. Some, like Butterworth, will read the book non-stop. Others might enjoy slowly savoring each chapter--including the PowerPoint-worthy insights from George Yeoman Pocock, the master craftsman and leading designer and builder of racing shells in the 20th Century.

"To be of championship caliber, a crew must have total confidence in each other, able to drive with abandon, confident that no man will get the full weight of the pull..."

"Pocock-built shells began to win U.S. Intercollegiate Rowing Association championships in 1923." According to Wikipedia, "he achieved international recognition by providing the eight-oared racing shells which won gold medals in the 1936 Summer Olympics and again in 1948 and 1952. In this era, nearly every collegiate and sport rowing program in America used wooden shells and oars built by Pocock."

Trust me--the reverential side trips down historical alleys are stunning. Brown excels in fluid detail. The writing: elegant. The insights: elevating.

Here's a keeper from pages 234-235. Listen to the wisdom as Master Boatbuilder Pocock coaches Joe, a young rower with promise and dreams--but a nasty childhood:

"He suggested that Joe think of a well-rowed race as a symphony, and himself just one player in the orchestra. If one fellow in an orchestra was playing out of tune, or playing at a different tempo, the whole piece would naturally be ruined.

"That's the way it was with rowing. What mattered more than how hard a man rowed was how well everything he did in the boat harmonized with what the other fellows were doing. And a man couldn't harmonize with his crewmates unless he opened his heart to them. He had to care about his crew. It wasn't just the rowing but his crewmates that he had to give himself up to, even if it meant getting his feelings hurt.

"Pocock paused and looked up at Joe. `If you don't like some fellow in the boat, Joe, you have to learn to like him. It has to matter to you whether he wins the race, not just whether you do.'"

Then this clincher:

"He told Joe to be careful not to miss his chance. He reminded him that he'd already learned to row past pain, past exhaustion, past the voice that told him it couldn't be done. That meant he had an opportunity to do things most men would never have a chance to do. And he concluded with a remark that Joe would never forget.

"'Joe, when you really start trusting those other boys, you will feel a power at work within you that is far beyond anything you've ever imagined. Sometimes, you will feel as if you have rowed right off the planet and are rowing among the stars.'"

Unlike most other sports, says the author, "One of the fundamental challenges in rowing is that when any one member of a crew goes into a slump the entire crew goes with him." How do individual slumps affect morale on your team--or in your family?

One of the University of Washington coxswains would often shout to the eight oarsmen, "MIB! MIB! MIB!" Brown writes, "The initialism stood for `mind in boat.' It was meant as a reminder that from the time an oarsman steps into a racing shell until the moment that the boat crosses the finish line, he must keep his mind focused on what is happening inside the boat." What acronym could your team use to keep everyone focused?


Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation
Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation
by Parker J. Palmer
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $10.68
221 used & new from $5.27

5.0 out of 5 stars The Clearness Committee Creates Chaos, November 21, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Yikes. It's almost December--and then we'll blink and raise a glass to the New Year, and do it all over again--expecting different results. Yikes, again.

So...before you grieve another year of unfulfilled promises to yourself (career-wise or other)--invest 109 pages in your calling. Read. Reflect. Listen. Pray. Discern. Jump.

Parker Palmer's stunning quick-read, "Let Your Life Speak," will help you think backwards and forwards. And his confession--that he failed to listen to his heart and squandered valuable years--is a warning to all of us (no matter how many candles on our last cake)...that vocation and calling matter.

He begins:
-- "...a funny thing happened on the way to my vocation."
--He was guided by Frederick Buechner's inspiring insight: "The place God calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet."

He confesses:
--"I had simply found a `noble' way to live a life that was not my own, a life spent imitating heroes instead of listening to my heart."

He learned:
--"Before you tell your life what you intend to do with it, listen for what it intends to do with you. Before you tell your life what truths and values you have decided to live up to, let your life tell you what truths you embody, what values you represent."
--"My youthful understanding of `Let your life speak' led me to conjure up the highest values I could imagine and then try to conform my life to them whether they were mine or not."

He adds: "If that sounds like what we are supposed to do with values, it is because that is what we are too often taught. There is a simplistic brand of moralism among us that wants to reduce the ethical life to making a list, checking it twice--against the index in some best-selling book of virtues, perhaps--and then trying very hard to be not naughty but nice."

He explains the book's subtitle, "Listening for the Voice of Vocation" with this:
--"Vocation does not come from willfulness. It comes from listening."
--"Vocation [rooted in the Latin for `voice'] does not mean a goal that I pursue. It means a calling that I hear. Before I can tell my life what I want to do with it, I must listen to my life telling me who I am."

Parker Palmer's Quaker roots add color and authenticity to this remarkable little book--a collection of essays, edited into a book-length gem.

It's tough to narrow down my favorites stories--I read most of them to my wife, Joanne--but certainly these two:

Favorite Story #1: The Clearness Committee.
A presidential search committee for a small educational institution invited Palmer for an interview. "So as is the custom in the Quaker community, I called on half a dozen trusted friends to help me discern my vocation by means of a `clearness committee,' a process in which the group refrains from giving you advice but spends three hours asking you honest, open questions to help discover your inner truth. (Looking back, of course, it is clear that my real intent in convening this group was not to discern anything but to brag about being offered a job I had already decided to accept!)

Gulp! One stunning question rocked his world (see pages 44-46)--and he said no to a career-enhancing opportunity.

Favorite Story #2: Outward Bound.
Hanging from a cliff, 110 feet above ground in his first Outward Bound experience (more like "Outward Down"), Palmer had a profound moment (pages 82-85). Later he reflected, "I chose the weeklong course at Hurricane Island, off the coast of Maine. I should have known from that name what was in store for me; next time I will sign up for the course at Happy Gardens or Pleasant Valley!"

He describes five shadow-casting monsters: First, "insecurity about identity and worth." Next, "the belief that the universe is a battleground, hostile to human interests."

The third one is a real poke-in-the-ribs. "A third shadow common among leaders is `functional atheism,' the belief that ultimate responsibility for everything rests with us. This is the unconscious, unexamined conviction that if anything decent is going to happen here, we are the ones who must make it happen--a conviction held even by people who talk a good game about God."

The fourth shadow is fear, "especially our fear of the natural chaos of life. Many of us--parents and teachers and CEOs--are deeply devoted to eliminating all remnants of chaos from the world."

The fifth shadow that leaders project is, "paradoxically, the denial of death itself." He's savvy! "Leaders who participate in this denial often demand that the people around them keep resuscitating things that are no longer alive." If you're working on a strategic plan right now, you must read pages 89 to 91!

Think about this:

"We will become better teachers not by trying to fill the potholes in our souls but by knowing them so well that we can avoid falling into them." So...who is helping you identify your potholes--and how might that impact your "true self" vocation?


Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards (Governance)
Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards (Governance)
by Richard T. Ingram
Edition: Paperback
20 used & new from $16.50

5.0 out of 5 stars The Generally Agreed-Upon List of Board Responsibilities, November 6, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
There are a couple of zillion books on board governance, so how do you sort through the clutter to find the best one?

For example, I'm often asked, "What governance book would you recommend we read before our next board and senior team retreat?"

My standard response is to ask a series of questions. What books have they read? Any new board members? Any stuck-in-a-rut board members? Do they need the basics on governance, or a kick-in-the-behind? Is it time for an inspirational book on decision-making and spiritual discernment? Are they readers or listeners? (Maybe a TED Talk?) Are they way too busy? Then maybe just a really, really skinny book--with big print and lots of white space? Faith-based or not?

One size doesn't fit all. So in addition to the governance books I've reviewed previously on Amazon, here are two ideas:
* Purchase four recent governance books and ask four board members to give 5- to 10-minute reviews at your next board meeting or retreat.
* Or...delegate your reading to four board members and then, based on their feedback, select one book for the entire board to read.

Consider this one: "Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards (Second Edition)," by Richard T. Ingram (just 90 pages).

The first title of six in BoardSource's "Governance Series" delivers the generally agreed-upon list of the 10 roles and responsibilities of nonprofit board members. (Faith-based boards will likely add one or two more.) The book includes an excellent 20-point self-assessment for board members, with probing questions like:
* "Are there ways in which your talents and interests can be more fully realized at or between board or committee meetings?"
* "Have you and the board taken steps to deal with real or apparent conflicts of interest in your board service?"
* "Which aspect of your service on the board has been the least satisfying and enjoyable?"

Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards: The Companion Workbook (58 pages) is also available.

Here's my favorite quotation (on CEO performance reviews) from the book:

"In the end, although we may not be able to precisely define what outstanding leadership is, we know it when we see it! Let's admit that this very subjective process is more art than science, more human than anything else.

"We can and should use various objective measures or strategic indicators of the organization's progress on its financial condition, for example, as part of the assessment process--but whether a leader stays or goes so often hangs on much more subtle factors."


Board Essentials: 12 Best Practices of Nonprofit Boards
Board Essentials: 12 Best Practices of Nonprofit Boards
by David L. Coleman
Edition: Paperback
Price: $16.98

5.0 out of 5 stars It's Short, Sweet, and Skinny!, November 6, 2014
What do you say when you're asked: "What governance book would you recommend we read before our next board and senior team retreat?"

My standard response is to ask a series of questions. What books have they read? Any new board members? Any stuck-in-a-rut board members? Do they need the basics on governance, or a kick-in-the-behind? Is it time for an inspirational book on decision-making and spiritual discernment? Are they readers or listeners? (Maybe a TED Talk?) Are they way too busy? Then maybe just a really, really skinny book--with big print and lots of white space? Faith-based or not?

One size doesn't fit all. So in addition to the governance books I've reviewed previously on Amazon, here are two ideas:
* Purchase four recent governance books and ask four board members to give 5- to 10-minute reviews at your next board meeting or retreat.
* Or...delegate your reading to four board members and then, based on their feedback, select one book for the entire board to read.

Consider this one: "Board Essentials: 12 Best Practices of Nonprofit Boards," by David L. Coleman.

This is your skinny book (just 113 pages). Coleman has culled from dozens of resources and produced 12 best practices--short chapters, long on practical tools and wisdom. Here's a topical taste: mission, membership, definition of governance, board roles and responsibilities, the CEO's role, the CEO and the board chair, board policies ("speak with one voice"), board meetings, fiduciary responsibilities, the board development committee--and much, much more.

Coleman, though he understands nonprofit life as a former foundation grantmaker and faith-based organization leader, has crafted this short-and-sweet book that works for both Christian organization boards and secular boards.

My favorite quotation in the book is a Peter Drucker keeper:

"The first task of the leader is to make sure that everyone sees the mission, hears it, lives it. If you lose sight of your mission, you begin to stumble and it shows very, very fast."


Best Practices for Effective Boards
Best Practices for Effective Boards
by Dwight M. Gunter
Edition: Paperback
Price: $14.44
59 used & new from $8.89

5.0 out of 5 stars How Many Board Members Does It Take to Change a Light Bulb?, November 6, 2014
I get this question a lot: "What governance book would you recommend we read before our next board and senior team retreat?"

My standard response is to ask a series of questions. What books have they read? Any new board members? Any stuck-in-a-rut board members? Do they need the basics on governance, or a kick-in-the-behind? Is it time for an inspirational book on decision-making and spiritual discernment? Are they readers or listeners? (Maybe a TED Talk?) Are they way too busy? Then maybe just a really, really skinny book--with big print and lots of white space? Faith-based or not?

One size doesn't fit all. So in addition to the governance books I've reviewed previously on Amazon, here are two ideas:
* Purchase four recent governance books and ask four board members to give 5- to 10-minute reviews at your next board meeting or retreat.
* Or...delegate your reading to four board members and then, based on their feedback, select one book for the entire board to read.

This should be one of your four options: "Best Practices for Effective Boards," by E. LeBron Fairbanks, Dwight M. Gunter II, and James R. Cauchenour.

Years of board leadership and board service for these three co-authors would rival almost any other trio. The best practices have been culled from 1) a lifetime of service as a denominational education commissioner (working with 54 educational institutions in 36 countries), 2) as a board chair and business leader, and 3) as a seasoned pastor/author and board member.

With almost 40 pages covering 11 documents in the appendix, you could skip the book and strike gold in every resource: "Leader Effectiveness Review Grid (22 leadership behaviors)," "Board Standing Policy Manual," "Rules of the Road for Christlike Conflict Management," and a "Board Survey" with 22 questions.

Can a book that articulates Christ-centered character standards for board members also meet the high bar of governance excellence? Yes! The guts of the book, 12 chapters, include helpful discussions on:
* "Ears In, Fingers Out" (great shorthand for the board role)
* "Take Time" (slowing decision-making down to hear from God)
* "Yes! to Missional Change" (choose your battles wisely)
* "Role Models of Generosity and Stewardship" (why board members must set the pace in generous giving and inspiring others to give)

In his chapter, "Yes! to Missional Change," Pastor Dwight Gunter asks "How many Christians does it take to change a light bulb?" His answer: "Seven. One to change the bulb and six to resist the change." (Insert "how many board members" and it's just as funny.)

Co-author LeBron Fairbanks, founding director of BoardServe, which serves as a global intervention and coaching resource for boards, shares my favorite quotation in the book--this from a CPA firm:

"In the long run, only integrity matters. In fact, without integrity, there will be no long run."


Serving as a Board Member
Serving as a Board Member
by John Pellowe
Edition: Paperback
4 used & new from $17.59

5.0 out of 5 stars The Only Bad Question Is the One You Had, But Didn't Ask, November 6, 2014
I'm frequently asked, "What governance book would you recommend we read before our next board and senior team retreat?"

My standard response is to ask a series of questions. What books have they read? Any new board members? Any stuck-in-a-rut board members? Do they need the basics on governance, or a kick-in-the-behind? Is it time for an inspirational book on decision-making and spiritual discernment? Are they readers or listeners? (Maybe a TED Talk?) Are they way too busy? Then maybe just a really, really skinny book--with big print and lots of white space? Faith-based or not?

One size doesn't fit all. So in addition to the governance books I've reviewed previously on Amazon, here are two ideas:
* Purchase four recent governance books and ask four board members to give 5- to 10-minute reviews at your next board meeting or retreat.
* Or...delegate your reading to four board members and then, based on their feedback, select one book for the entire board to read.

Definitely...consider "Serving as a Board Member: Practical Guidance for Directors of Christian Ministries," by John Pellowe.

In his foreword to this excellent book, Jim Brown, author of The Imperfect Board Member: Discovering the Seven Disciplines of Governance Excellence, notes "now it seems like `governance consultant' is a pre-painted shingle that goes with every early-retirement, golden parachute check that gets handed out. The web is fraught with blogs and e-books on the topics of boards."

Based on a seminar, and a DVD of the same title, the book is one of the best Christ-centered governance books available. Right from the get-go in the first chapter, "Readiness to Serve," Pellowe speaks to the hearts of future board members about passion and calling:

* "If the ministry's mission is not closely tied to your interests, your board service will be a draining experience..."
* "The Holy Spirit can nudge us towards those good works that God has prepared for us to do (Eph. 2:10); this nudging is usually described as a call."
* "God's individual call is normally in line with the gifts that you already have."

And he's just warming up on pages 4 and 5! He adds on page 7, "You really should be able to think theologically about the mission, governance, and leadership of the ministry you are serving. If you are new to the Christian faith, you may not yet be well enough equipped for board service in a Christian ministry."

The book's format is unique with the voices of other experts blended into sidebars. Pellowe, CEO of the Canadian Council of Christian Charities since 2003, sprinkles in his personal insights and stories (like his home church board meetings!) every few pages--fascinating stuff! Example: His story on page 126 on the "Bad" 3 Rs: boards that waste enormous amounts of time on "Reviewing, Rehashing and Redoing."

It's tough to pick just one favorite quotation or paragraph--but this grabbed me:

"You must be diligent as a director. Make sure that you ask any questions that are on your mind. As the saying goes, the only bad question is the one you had, but didn't ask. You may think that since you have a banker on your board, you do not need to ask any financial questions because someone else is looking after that. It is your duty to ask these questions anyway. Do not rely on someone else to do your thinking."


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars 50% of employees are late to work on Mondays, October 27, 2014
Doug Spada, author of "Monday Morning Atheist," is leading a "Monday Revolution" to inspire the workforce to think differently--and biblically--about Mondays. He'd also like you to stop your incessant Monday moaning.

This revolution started with a deep dive into 10 years of research and field experience. "We began this project compiling 30 specific behavioral indicators that measure the integration of faith into everyday issues and key relationships at work. Over the last several years, we have presented this Index of On-the-Job Spiritual Health Indicators to over 5,000 Christians."

Released earlier this year, the spiritual health index listed "10 Most Common Workplace Issues," and included:
* "I do not manage stress and discouragement by practicing the principle of rest and recreation."
* "I do not see my work calling as really serving society and God."
* "I am not seeking and hearing God when making work decisions."

Spada is the founder and CEO of WorkLife "where he develops innovative resources to help people experience God while they work." So with customer research in hand, another resource, "The Monday Switch Kit" was born--and "innovative" doesn't begin to describe it.

Along with co-author Dave Scott, Spada defines a Monday Morning Atheist as "someone who believes in God but who works like He does not exist."

"When God is involuntarily or intentionally switched OFF we don't address the serious flaw in our independent nature and we suffer the consequences."

What's needed? It's the practice of keeping God switched ON each Monday, because "Monday is the gateway to your entire spiritual work week. When you start your week poorly, you may find you are unable to recover for several days or even weeks. On Mondays you need to focus on thriving not surviving."

Why focus on Mondays?
* "For most of us, Monday is our least favorite day of the week."
* 50% of employees are late to work on Mondays
* Productivity is around 30% on Mondays
* "And most of us don't even smile until 11:16 a.m. on this dreaded day."
* "More heart attacks and suicides happen on Mondays than any other work day."

"Millions of Christians look great on Sunday, then switch God OFF by Monday morning--a distinct switch to a form of practical atheism. No God on Monday! This reality is undermining God's purposes for our work and our lives. Monday's are hurting workers, families, churches and business alike."

THANK GOD IT'S MONDAY!

To help, WorkLife has created irresistible resources to help individuals, small groups, the workplace, and the church.

The authors quote Jacques Maritain, "There are pseudo-atheists who think that they believe in God, but who in reality deny his existence by each one of their deeds."

Monday Morning Atheist addresses three false assumptions, labeled "Short Circuits," and what to do about them:
* Short Circuit #1: Only some of life is spiritual.
* Short Circuit #2: I'm alone and it's all up to me.
* Short Circuit #3: My work is just a waste.

Leaders and managers take note: A national survey reported that "over 55% of us are dissatisfied with our jobs." That's epidemic--but there's a remedy.


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