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Eclipse (Twilight)
Eclipse (Twilight)
by Stephenie Meyer
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $19.99
3786 used & new from $0.01

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If you loved the first two books, do NOT read this one, December 23, 2008
This review is from: Eclipse (Twilight) (Hardcover)
I personally found myself completely and utterly infatuated with the Twilight Saga after reading the first two books and seeing the film version recently. The love story between Edward and Bella had an almost dreamlike quality to me and I am sure to many others. For me, reading 'Eclipse' ruins much of what the series had before. After finishing the book, I have personally blocked the book off. To me, the Twilight Saga ended after 'New Moon' because I fail to believe that the Edward and Bella and even Jacob I've learned to love could do the things they do in this third book.


Use Your Illusion I
Use Your Illusion I
Price: $8.99
323 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars The Illusion Masterpiece, December 2, 2005
This review is from: Use Your Illusion I (Audio CD)
For the common rock fan, the term "Guns n' Roses" is synonymous with "Appettite for Destruction."

Rarely are the follow-up double albums, Use Your Illusion I & II even mentioned today among the casual fan.

But, the diehard G'n'R fan such as myself know better. In the G'n'R fan forums of today, which together boast tens of thousands of daily visitors, the general consensus is that the Illusion albums deserve in their own right to be named one of hard rock's finest achievements.

Critic reviews of the albums were poor due to both albums having a good amount of "filler" which I, even as the most hardcore of fans, find true. The Use Your Illusion's or UYI's for short, are not albums that I can find myself listening straight through like Appettite. In fact, I don't think I've ever even heard some of the songs more than once.

But for those songs that have left a lasting impression, I will touch on them briefly.

Use Your Illusion I is the harder rocker of the two Illusion's. Songs include:

"Dust N' Bones" which is a fine example of a laid-back rocker that features a catchy end chorus long with a solid guitar solo.

"Live N Let Die" - a single off the album and cover of the Paul McCartney classic. Although the studio version is nowhere near as good as seeing this song performed live, it'll still leave you with a desire to see the Bond flick.

"Don't Cry" - Izzy's power ballad which features a very powerful message, a tear-dropping solo from Slash, and an absolutely memorable ending with both the majestic vocals and riffs.

"Double Talkin' Jive" - an Izzy rocker that although only 2-3 minutes in length, makes you want more. A song that's expanded to 14-15 minutes in length live, DTJ is an absolute unknown as far as great g'n'r rockers go. The ending to the song features a Spanish guitar tune that is reminiscent of the Eagles' 'Hotel California.'

"November Rain" - greatest ballad of all-time, no competition. No one who thinks November Rain is not a great song has heard it enough times to respect it for what it is - a masterpiece. Axl's ode to undying love is a build-up of majestic proportions. Everything about the song is perfect from its beginning piano piece to the slow vocal buildup to the guitar solos to the classic outro.

"Coma" - my personal favorite G'n'R tune at the moment. If you haven't already listened to this song 3-5 times on full volume - please do so, I promise you that you won't be disappointed. The last 3 and 1/2 minutes of this song are simply rock n' roll at its purest. Axl's vocals in belting out what its like to live life like its a coma is truly unique even among G'n'R's catalogue.


Sir Gawain and The Green Knight (Oxford World's Classics)
Sir Gawain and The Green Knight (Oxford World's Classics)
by Helen Cooper
Edition: Paperback
48 used & new from $0.01

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reading underneath the decisions of Gawain, November 4, 2003
Keith Harrison's translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a masterful classic that creates a new world in the reader's mind dating back to the times of Arthur's Round Table. Detailing the travels of the knight Sir Gawain, this tale exemplifies the genre of writing characteristic of Arthurian romances. The style sees the use of alliteration in pentameter showing a great appreciation of the ideals of poetry to accompany the basis of recreating a story passed down through generations. In addition, the short story does a prototypical job in portraying the values of the chivalric life. Using the pentangle as his model of excellence, the poet brings about a new understanding within the reader of the underlying morals that are at the heart of every Arthurian knight.
But even without a deep respect of the style of writing, the reader finds in Keith Harrison's SGGK a great retelling of a story that follows the up's and down's of Gawain and his quest for the Green Knight. Within the visible, physical struggle, an inner, mental conflict between the knight's own mindset as a romance hero and his all too obvious humanity becomes the dominant force in the narrative. The inner struggle is something that every human being, from past ages or modern cultures will face.
The deeper meaning in SGGK provides a backbone to a story beautifully translated into modern poetry. Because of the story's symbolic undertones, the recommendation is for the reader to read through the story once for its basic hero story and next to answer the question of why the Green Knight did not kill Gawain to upend his side of the deal. The realization then becomes the connection that Gawain's weaknesses have with your own human flaws. Because of the correlation between Gawain and the common man, this story has survived the test of time and space.


Sir Gawain and The Green Knight (Oxford World's Classics)
Sir Gawain and The Green Knight (Oxford World's Classics)
by Helen Cooper
Edition: Paperback
48 used & new from $0.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reading underneath the decisions of Gawain, November 4, 2003
Keith Harrison's translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a masterful classic that creates a new world in the reader's mind dating back to the times of Arthur's Round Table. Detailing the travels of the knight Sir Gawain, this tale exemplifies the genre of writing characteristic of Arthurian romances. The style sees the use of alliteration in pentameter showing a great appreciation of the ideals of poetry to accompany the basis of recreating a story passed down through generations. In addition, the short story does a prototypical job in portraying the values of the chivalric life. Using the pentangle as his model of excellence, the poet brings about a new understanding within the reader of the underlying morals that are at the heart of every Arthurian knight.
But even without a deep respect of the style of writing, the reader finds in Keith Harrison's SGGK a great retelling of a story that follows the up's and down's of Gawain and his quest for the Green Knight. Within the visible, physical struggle, an inner, mental conflict between the knight's own mindset as a romance hero and his all too obvious humanity becomes the dominant force in the narrative. The inner struggle is something that every human being, from past ages or modern cultures will face.
The deeper meaning in SGGK provides a backbone to a story beautifully translated into modern poetry. Because of the story's symbolic undertones, the recommendation is for the reader to read through the story once for its basic hero story and next to answer the question of why the Green Knight did not kill Gawain to upend his side of the deal. The realization then becomes the connection that Gawain's weaknesses have with your own human flaws. Because of the correlation between Gawain and the common man, this story has survived the test of time and space.


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