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Customer Reviews: 5
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Helpful Votes: 92




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Colin L. Miller RSS Feed (SIERRA VISTA, AZ USA)
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Guide to Microlife (Science: Life and Environmental Science)
Guide to Microlife (Science: Life and Environmental Science)
by Kenneth G. Rainis
Edition: Paperback
41 used & new from $39.92

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book for an Introduction to Microlife, December 20, 2009
After getting my Celestron 44340 LCD Digital LDM Biological Microscope I needed a photographic inspiration and a good guide to the microlife I would be finding. Many of the microscopic creatures were unknown to me, and this book helped identify what I'd found. The book has colorful, detailed photos and I identified a number of diatoms & algae, bursaria, scenedesmus, peranema, flatworms, rotifers, copepods, ostracods, amphipods, fairy shrimp, vorticella, and tardigrades.


Victorinox Swiss Army Midnite MiniChamp Pocket Knife (Translucent Sapphire)
Victorinox Swiss Army Midnite MiniChamp Pocket Knife (Translucent Sapphire)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cool little Swiss Army Knife, December 20, 2009
The MiniChamp is the biggest little Swiss Army Knife out there, with more attachments than you'll know what do with. But it's very useful, with a bright white LED flashlight, mini ballpoint pen, scissors, and numerous blades. My only CON is that it looks so nice, I don't want to carry it around because I know the shiny transparent blue plastic cover will be covered in scratches in no time.


No Title Available

4.0 out of 5 stars Nice mini blacklight, December 20, 2009
It's a keychain-sized blacklight LED flashlight. It can be used to shine on paper money and see if the security thread glows, or shine on the hands of a watch to get them glowing. The only CON is that the activation button has to be pressed several times before the light comes on. Why is this _annoying_ feature necessary when there are things such as a green laser pointer (that in an eyeblink can burn the retinas of yours or someones else's eyes) lights up immediately when its button is pressed? The only good thing about the safety button is that it can't be accidentally turned on in your pocket and run down the battery.


Celestron 44340 LCD Digital LDM Biological Microscope
Celestron 44340 LCD Digital LDM Biological Microscope
2 used & new from $274.95

73 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Microscope for the Digital Age, December 20, 2009
I had an ordinary optical "200x" microscope and saw a few shaky, interesting things in a drop of water on a glass slide, I but had no good way to take a photo. Holding a digital camera up to the eyepiece was problematic at best. I'd heard of USB microscopes that connected to a PC, such as the QX3. Checking the reviews on Amazon quickly dissuaded me from that. Then I found the Celestron 44340. It had a built-in 2MP digital camera. Images were saved to internal memory and transferred to the PC via USB cable, or to a SD card. I was also concerned about getting good images. In books like Guide to Microlife (ISBN 0-531-11266-7), there were excellent photos in darkfield illumination, as well as the usual brightfield. The Celestron 44340 did both, although darkfield only worked at the 4x and 10x objectives. I got a set of glass slides, glass cover slips, some depression slides, eyedroppers, and containers. After the summer rains, there were many places to collect samples, as well as from shorelines of rivers and lakes. I was able to successfully image in brightfield and darkfield rotifers, amoebas, flatworms, copepods, ostracods, shrimp hatchlings, vorticella, bursaria, diatoms and algae, and a variety of fast-moving ciliates. In addition to digital photos of up to 2 megapixels in size, I also recorded movies of a few seconds to a few minutes, sometimes switching between 4x magnification to 10x or 40x to get more details, and even switching between brightfield and darkfield. If I found something interesting, I could use software to extract a still image. The only CON I can think of is that when the microscope is turned off then back on, the internal date and time resets to 1/9/2031 8:00 PM, so any photos or movies taken all have that date, unless you manually set it every time.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 17, 2013 9:41 AM PST


Butterflies of North America (Kaufman Focus Guides)
Butterflies of North America (Kaufman Focus Guides)
by Kenn Kaufman
Edition: Paperback
49 used & new from $2.97

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reference for identifying butterflies!, October 6, 2003
This is a great reference book for identifying butterflies. I especially liked the detailed photos and illustrations that showed butterflies as they would generally appear in nature. Other books often show the butterfly with wings open, but not with wings folded up, for example. This book shows both, including the differences between male and female butterflies and other details, so it makes it easy to compare your photo with the book's. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who takes lots of butterfly photos and wants to identify what you've photographed.


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