Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Beach House $5 Off Fire TV Stick Labor Day Sale in Wine Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation STEM Toys & Games
Customer Discussions > Gold Box forum

Veteran's Day USA - Sunday, November 11, 2012


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 10, 2012 12:43:07 PM PST
JC says:
War is Hell.

This is not a post to discuss the rights and wrongs of wars... nor is it to discuss the political chess pieces that the men and women of every country have endured... it is to HONOR those that have served their country. There have been many that have given their lives not to protect their country but have given the ultimate sacrifice to protect their Brothers in Arms.

This is a a tribute to those in the US that have received the highest recommendation given by their nation... and for some... other nations... the Medal Of Honor. In so many cases they are recognized for going 'above and beyond' to save the lives of others around them. It is MY honor to say THANK YOU.

http://www.cmohs.org/

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 1:09:18 PM PST
We do that in Australia too to remember the end of WWI and the Aussies who fought during the war. We call it Remembrance Day. At 11:00am on the 11th of November everything stops for a minute's silence.

Posted on Nov 11, 2012 5:02:08 AM PST
SLAYER® says:
Nov 11, 1918:
World War I ends

At 11 o'clock in the morning of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the First World War--known at the time as the Great War--comes to an end.

By the end of autumn 1918, the alliance of the Central Powers was unraveling in its war effort against the better supplied and coordinated Allied powers. Facing exhausted resources on the battlefield, turmoil on the home front and the surrender of its weaker allies, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire, Germany was finally forced to seek an armistice with the Allies in the early days of November 1918. On November 7, the German chancellor, Prince Max von Baden, sent delegates to Compiegne, France, to negotiate the agreement; it was signed at 5:10 a.m. on the morning of November 11.

Ferdinand Foch, commander in chief of all Allied forces on the Western Front, sent a message by telegraph to all his commanders: "Hostilities will cease on the entire front November 11 at 11 a.m. French time." The commanders ordered the fighting to continue throughout the morning of November 11, prompting later accusations that some men died needlessly in the last few hours of the war. As the historian John Buchan has written of that memorable morning: "Officers had their watches in their hands, and the troops waited with the same grave composure with which they had fought." As watch hands reached 11, "there came a second of expectant silence, and then a curious rippling sound, which observers far behind the front likened to the noise of a light wind. It was the sound of men cheering from the Vosges [mountains] to the sea."

The Great War took the life of some 9 million soldiers; 21 million more were wounded. Civilian casualties caused indirectly by the war numbered close to 10 million. The two nations most affected were Germany and France, each of which sent some 80 percent of their male populations between the ages of 15 and 49 into battle. At the peace conference in Paris in 1919, Allied leaders would state their desire to build a post-war world that would safeguard itself against future conflicts of such devastating scale. The Versailles Treaty, signed on June 28, 1919, would not achieve this objective. Saddled with war guilt and heavy reparations and denied entrance into the League of Nations, Germany complained it had signed the armistice under false pretenses, having believed any peace would be a "peace without victory" as put forward by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson in his famous Fourteen Points speech of January 1918. As the years passed, hatred of the treaty and its authors settled into a smoldering resentment in Germany that would, two decades later, be counted--to an arguable extent--among the causes of the Second World War.

But that would all come later. On November 11, 1918, the dominant emotion for many on and off the battlefield was relief at the coming of peace, mixed with somber mourning for the many lives lost. In a letter written to his parents in the days following the armistice, one soldier--26-year-old Lieutenant Lewis Plush of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF)--eloquently pondered the war's lasting impact: "There was a war, a great war, and now it is over. Men fought to kill, to maim, to destroy. Some return home, others remain behind forever on the fields of their greatest sacrifice. The rewards of the dead are the lasting honors of martyrs for humanity; the reward of the living is the peaceful conscience of one who plays the game of life and plays it square."

------------- www.history.com --------------------
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Gold Box forum
Participants:  3
Total posts:  3
Initial post:  Nov 10, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 11, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.

Search Customer Discussions