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Amazon voucher notice for a free $500 Amazon.com gift card...does anyone know if this is a hoax or legit?


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Showing 1-25 of 27 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 20, 2011 2:34:38 PM PST
MNM says:
Amazon voucher notice for a free $500 Amazon.com gift card...does anyone know if this is a hoax or legit? I received on via e-mail and wonder if it opens me computer up to any one who wants to sell something. They want me to participate in a survey. I am suspicious of everything.

Posted on Dec 20, 2011 2:37:19 PM PST
Rhea D. says:
I won the Nigerian lottery and all I have to do to claim my Million$$$ is to wire $3000 to a Nigerian Prince. Does anyone know if this is a hoax or if it is legit?

Posted on Dec 20, 2011 2:38:20 PM PST
Simple rule to live by: if it sounds too good to be true, it is.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2011 2:43:40 PM PST
Sheila (NJ) says:
It's a hoax.

Posted on Dec 20, 2011 2:44:42 PM PST
B. White says:
First off... Amazon would probably let you know as soon as you signed into your account here on this site if you actually did 'win' something from them.

If it comes in an e-mail, I always figure it for a hoax... ESPECIALLY if they don't use your name, misspell something in the e-mail, or give you a link that you have to click on.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2011 2:45:31 PM PST
2Debbie says:
It does sound too good to be true Martha. You can just do a simple search for $500 Amazon gift card scams. It's probably one of those. For example, here's one that deals with facebook and the $500 Amazon card - http://www.hyphenet.com/blog/2011/12/13/500-amazon-gift-card-survey-scam-hits-facebook/

You're smart to be suspicious of everything these days! Sorry you won't get a $500 gift card . . . but on the other hand it's better to be safe than sorry.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2011 2:46:07 PM PST
3 Crows says:
Martha you had better be suspicious. It's probably a spoof message to glean data from you. I get over 30 spams and spoofs a day, many of them offering me something for nothing. I don't even read them anymore, and just let my spam filter trash them. If you get an unsolicited email with an offer you can't refuse, trash it as quickly as you can or quicker. If nothing else they will sell your email address if you answer it at all, then you will soon be flooded with spam. When you answer it tells the sender he has a live body and makes you a target. Have Fun and Profit!

Posted on Dec 20, 2011 2:46:26 PM PST
medialint says:
Don't click on any links unless you verify for sure it's going to http://amazon.com. A lot of phishing is going around for sites purporting to be amazon. I've one claiming my Dell laptop as shipped, and another purporting to be a confirmation of my order for a Kindle. Neither of which I ordered, and the links went to sites which were not amazon. Probably a great time of year to be a hacker.

Posted on Dec 20, 2011 2:46:55 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Mar 26, 2012 2:59:59 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2011 2:52:44 PM PST
Simple rules...

If an email refers to you by your email address rather than your real name, they are phishing. This is why none of my email addresses are my name. Even if your name is in an email from a friend be wary. Your friend or family may have a virus that uses their address book to send emails that look real. They simply say "hey joe, check this out" but your name and address was mined by the virus. Ask yourself, would this person send me this email?

If you hover over links in an email and their actual address link displayed on the bottom of the window does not match the displayed address and/or the url is not a domain name like http://amazon.com, DO NOT CLICK.

Many more rules to live by, but these two will cover most scenarios.

Posted on Dec 20, 2011 3:21:38 PM PST
MommaCat says:
Click on Help (upper right of your screen)
Click on Unexpected E-mail from Amazon?
Click Reporting Phishing or Spoofed E-mails to Amazon

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2012 1:29:58 PM PST
J. Wood says:
I got an email about it and clicked on the link but it went to a URL which wasn't Amazon so I stopped there!
I think it's a hoax as it didn't come to my dedicated Amazon email address which is strange.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2012 1:51:21 PM PST
esanta says:
NEVER EVER CLICK LINKS ON EMAILS IF YOU'RE NOT CERTAIN OF THEIR ORIGIN.
You may end up contaminating your system with pretty nasty stuff and exposing all your private information.

Posted on Jan 23, 2012 1:58:21 PM PST
Islander says:
WOW!!! For a change...very good advice from everyone.

Posted on Jan 23, 2012 1:59:44 PM PST
BBP says:
Yes, DO NOT CLICK on email links. Hover over them and see if they really say http://www.amazon.com at the bottom of your browser instead of another address like 'somefakeurl.com/2e9ddf9234511f11'. All that stuff at the end might be a tracking identifier to confirm your email address. Once you click on it, you've just confirmed that you are a real person and the real fun begins for the spammers.

Also use longurl.org to expand out and see and redirects safely.

Posted on Jan 23, 2012 2:01:38 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 23, 2012 2:12:22 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 25, 2012 5:36:20 PM PST]

Posted on Jan 23, 2012 2:20:02 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 23, 2012 2:44:02 PM PST
Serendipity says:
I had an email a few weeks aga supposedly from Amazon; it looked very official, even had their logo in it, and their auto signature when they send the emails. I was suspicious because it said that my account will shut down if I didn't enter the following info - name, street address, phone # and a few other details. It did not ask for any cc details. I phoned Amazon and they asked me to send them a copy of the email and headers and they checked into it and said it was a hoax that they would never send something like that as my account is in good standing and even if it wasn't they would ask me to contact them directly. I never heard the outcome but I haven't received anything else simililar.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2012 7:21:36 AM PDT
R. Allan says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2012 7:25:46 AM PDT
Peregrinn says:
When everyone who commented on this had already steered the OP clear of the obviously fraudulent offer, why would you bother to revive this thread with your not-very-clever response?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2012 8:05:23 AM PDT
Grumbler says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2012 8:06:02 AM PDT
Jeep Girl says:
duh

Posted on Mar 11, 2012 10:13:13 AM PDT
R Allen is channeling SLAYER today, he being Amazon's preeminent dead-thread raiser. Actually, if you believe Peregrinn's 'not-very-clever response' assessment he's mirroring SLAYER perfectly.

Posted on Aug 27, 2014 5:12:28 AM PDT
Draygeaux says:
Mine was for a $1000. Nobody gives a $1000 gift voucher for free. Luckily mine went to my spam folder and I was able to report it.
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Discussion in:  Gold Box forum
Participants:  26
Total posts:  27
Initial post:  Dec 20, 2011
Latest post:  Aug 27, 2014

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