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Customer Discussions > Gold Box forum

School bullies used to perform a valuable service for their high schools


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Showing 1-25 of 37 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 21, 2012 6:28:27 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
In grade school teachers got to know their students well enough to know when one of them needed counseling. But high school teachers are far less likely to identify a kid in need of help because they see their students for only 45 minutes a day and loners go unidentified. One way these troubled kids came to the attention of the school was when they were the subject of bullying.

Now in an environment of zero tolerance for bullies, these troubled kids are more likely to be left alone by the bullying types, meaning troubled kids like Adam Lanza are more likely to fall through cracks with no one noticing.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 6:33:45 PM PST
Susan says:
So you think they'd be better off getting the crap beat out of them every now and then?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 6:46:58 PM PST
Allen Borum says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 6:50:54 PM PST
My high school bully was murdered just a couple of years after high school.
I guess he bullied the wrong person...

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 6:56:53 PM PST
Prospero says:
In the case of Columbine, revenge for being bullied was the motive. So, another Epic Fail for you. SO sad.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 7:11:42 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 21, 2012 7:13:43 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 7:25:17 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 21, 2012 7:29:41 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
No. It's realpolitik in the school system. Bullies unintentionally did something constructive if they picked on a kid and that was what brought him/her to attention of school officials as a disturbed young person. With bullying a no-no, these troubled kids stay under the radar and the schools haven't figured out how to get help for a troubled kid who wants to remain invisible. Occasionally, one of these invisible kids does something horrifying.

It's simply a theory that occurred to me after re-reading Freakonomics. A theory. People are trying to figure out why these episodes occur and I'm postulating that this change could be a contributing cause. I'm not saying bring back bullying. I'm saying, keep track of your students, all of them, especially the ones who don't want to be kept track of.

Posted on Dec 21, 2012 7:30:14 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Dec 21, 2012 7:57:59 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 7:51:46 PM PST
Prospero says:
My kid races slot cars QuintBy. ANd I try to get in to what she enjoys. Lol, got a problem with that? DO you actually click on someone's profile everytime they don't agree with you? Lol.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 7:57:00 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 21, 2012 7:58:27 PM PST
JMM says:
QuintBy,

Did you ever consider that these disturbed kids became that way as a result of bullying? If we let young people be their individual selves, without being harassed or ridiculed, then we might see fewer of these incidents.

Of course, you have to have a thick skin - a little bit of teasing and playing around is to be expected from kids and teenagers. But there's a difference between a little bit of horseplay and actual physical/mental abuse that some kids are unfortunately subjected to these days.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 7:57:57 PM PST
Prospero says:
"especially the ones who don't want to be kept track of. "

That would be bullies. Look, it's a funny theory and all and brainstorming is always useful, but issues like you are trying to "theorize" about are multifaceted. Taking a scientific approach, Columbine would make it obvious that your hypothesis fails.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 7:59:32 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 8:04:05 PM PST
Prospero says:
I wil start capitalizing then - LOL. You are seeing it because I am laughing - heh.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 8:26:50 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 8:32:21 PM PST
JMM says:
Then the answer is that teachers, parents, friends, etc need to step up and identify these troubled kids. The answer is not to have these kids bullied.

BTW, just because someone is shy or quiet doesn't necessarily mean they are troubled. We can't all be the popular ones, some people are just a bit more comfortable in their own thoughts. Many people have the ability to be function just fine from a social perspective, yet they prefer to spend a lot of time alone. This doesn't mean they need help, nor should they be bullied.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 8:37:09 PM PST
Susan says:
That's a good possibility. When I was in high school the guidance councilor, Mrs Johnson, always called students into the lounge or cafeteria area and talked to them one on one. Not really for any reason, but to just get to know a little about each person and I think she always knew who she needed to keep an eye on for help.

I've always thought that shy/ timid people and down on their luck people were picked out to be bullied. I've also thought that these people being picked on think of ways to get even with the bullies in their spare time. Maybe that's what has led to some of these shootings,, just plain old retribution they thought of in advance.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 8:46:52 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 8:56:18 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 21, 2012 8:56:51 PM PST
JMM says:
I think you are definitely right about some of your points. While I doubt the act of being bullied is a voluntary one, the victim does often choose not to report the situation to an adult.

I think one reason for this is that certain kids are less likely to advocate for themselves if they feel telling an adult won't solve the problem or if they fear it will make the bullying worse. So many instances where a child tells an adult about bullying ends up with the bully getting a "warning" - then the bully just retaliates. This is why enforcing zero-tolerance policies is so important in my opinion.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 8:57:03 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
Very good point, JMM.

Posted on Dec 21, 2012 8:58:54 PM PST
Bixby says:
If you have grandchildren and one is a quiet, shy child will you explain to him/her that the bully is doing them a service by pointing out to everyone every single day of thier school year that the grandchild is shy/quiet and weird for being that way because your afraid the kid is a secret murderer in the making and now you can get them the help they need OR are you going to give them a hug, tell them its wrong to bully and that they are just fine the way they are??

Posted on Dec 21, 2012 9:08:23 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
I went to Catholic grade school and Catholic high school in the late 1960s. We had a boy I'll call 'Lou' who came to the class and ritualistic slapped his face and said 'eeehhh'. Not regularly, but if we were taking a test and the ambient noise level was low, the sound that he made seemed so absurd that you had to choke down your own weird sound. He was an obvious target, and there was one boy in particular who would chase him around the asphalt school yard trying to kick him in the groin. I don't think anyone who witnessed that came away think that Lou was the sick one. So, as hard as it is to sympathize with bullies, the fact of the matter is thatr they too are also exhibiting their own troubled nature.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 9:13:38 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 10, 2013 7:08:43 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 9:29:34 PM PST
W. Wehmann says:
So funny to see the bullying right here in these posts by the anti-bullying 'adults.'

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 21, 2012 9:43:23 PM PST
Bruce K. says:
W. Wehmann, indeed. I've taught my sons that the way to deal with bullies is to treat them civilly, explain to them why bullying is wrong and then send them on their way with a hearty "FU".

Posted on Dec 22, 2012 6:23:15 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 10, 2013 7:08:53 AM PST]
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Gold Box forum
Participants:  17
Total posts:  37
Initial post:  Dec 21, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 24, 2012

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