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Microsoft Windows 8 Pro Special Deal Ends Jan. 31st


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Showing 1-25 of 162 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 29, 2013 3:47:15 PM PST
gapperguy says:
I already upgraded my computer with Windows 8 Pro and the free Media Package. Total cost was $39.99 from their website. This deal ends on Thursday so anyone considering the upgrade needs to act fast. It took a little learning curve, but I like Windows 8 now.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 4:16:15 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 29, 2013 4:18:33 PM PST
Vista 8, Windows NT 6.2, is already tanking and is taking out the entire PC industry even faster than it was declining before.

It has gotten so bad that some PC shops are charging $125 to downgrade to Vista 7, Windows NT 6.1.

Valve is now openly recommending Ubuntu GNU/Linux to its customers, on their front page, and pointing out that it runs their video games faster, and including a link to the free download.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 4:18:07 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 29, 2013 4:20:12 PM PST
Why would you pay $40 for an upgrade (not even a full version, which costs well over $100) and brag about a "free (as in beer) media codec package"?

I just install gstreamer's codecs and ffmpeg and I can use them however I want, and share them under the terms of the GPL/LGPL Free (as in Freedom) Software, just like the rest of the system.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 4:43:26 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 29, 2013 4:47:50 PM PST]

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 4:47:50 PM PST
I really like Xp pro with SP 3. It's a solid o/s and does everything I need. Also, I have a $2,000 high speed document scanner made by Canon and they couldn't be bothered to update drivers for windows 7 or 8, so I have to hook up an old xp pro notebook to it. I feel like I'm before forced to upgrade to windoze crap when I update my pcs, and would just stick with XP pro if I could.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 4:47:53 PM PST
Some OEMs don't include Windows, and invest that $90-$100 into better hardware instead, or proper customer support which speaks English, or a combination of the two.

Dell figured they'd cheat people out of an extra $50, figuring that all things being equal, there are some people out there, like me, who, if left with no other option, would pay more for the system to not come pre-infected with the Windows malware itself. In fairness to Dell, Windows only does cost them maybe $20 because of all the crapware they bundle onto the system. (The cheaper licenses, like Home, are sometimes even money makers, because Dell can foist the same amount of trial crapware onto a Windows SKU that costs them less.)

Oddly, the pricing scheme they chose for Ubuntu GNU/Linux was the same as the program they had (have?) which charged customers an extra $50 to not include all the crapware. (Well, aside from Windows itself.)

Other than the shoddy reliability, difficulty in dealing with device drivers (which are all proprietary and might not even work with anything but the most recent version of Windows from when the hardware was sold, and which the device maker may or may not ever fix bugs after the initial driver release), the Digital Restrictions Malware (DRM), the 7-8 page long EULA that describes all the ways that Microsoft can sell off your private information, and how you are forbidden from using the copy you paid for, and are forced to agree that you do not own the software, and are just in a rental agreement that Microsoft can unilaterally end at any time, for any or no reason, you are forced to submit yourself to this thing called "product activation", and even after all that, you have to drain your computer's resources, which could be better spent running programs you actually want to use, to run antivirus software, which doesn't work, and often costs $50-60 a year for the "full version" that doesn't time out, quit updating itself, and spam you with pop-ups that are designed to psychologically manipulate you.

Norton, for example, had one that went something like "Say, that's a nice computer you have there, it would be a shame if something happened to it....Click here to give us your money."

Every time I am asked to work on someone's Windows computer that "slowed down and is barely responding at all", there's always an antivirus program there that has been shut down by the malware and is not protecting the system. Gee, that was $50-60 well spent.... Plus, "Computer Repair Technicians" manage to make $70-80 an hour in some cases just to fix this crap, at least for another week, until more of it comes along. Some of them, such as Best Buy, will even claim you should just give up and buy a new computer, which will come with Windows, and leave you back where you started, eventually.

Why not make a real upgrade?

http://www.ubuntu.com

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 4:51:57 PM PST
OldAmazonian says:
because it's hard?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 4:52:12 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 29, 2013 4:52:37 PM PST
Isaac Fischer: "I really like Xp pro with SP 3. It's a solid o/s and does everything I need. Also, I have a $2,000 high speed document scanner made by Canon and they couldn't be bothered to update drivers for windows 7 or 8, so I have to hook up an old xp pro notebook to it. I feel like I'm before forced to upgrade to windoze crap when I update my pcs, and would just stick with XP pro if I could."

Yes, I have an HP printer that they stopped making Windows drivers for sometime around Vista. I don't know if they'd still work in Vista 7 or 8, but the drivers had bugs that I've seen other users complain about, that HP has obviously never bothered to fix. Judging from what I see on their site, HP's printer driver bundle for Windows is hundreds of megabytes because it includes bloated crapware.

Someone I know who has a similar Officejet model "upgraded" to Vista 8 and now their scanner doesn't work.

Why do people put up with this crap? The only reason HP does it is so you have to buy a new printer. That's part of the "hidden upgrade costs" of Windows. You have to throw out a lot of working hardware and spend hundreds replacing it because the hardware maker didn't feel like producing new drivers. New drivers cost them money to develop. They cost hundreds of dollars to get Microsoft to digitally sign.

Leaving the users suffering with a driver full of bugs that hasn't been updated in 6 years and last fully worked one or two Windows releases ago is not only free for them, it's a money maker, because they get you to replace hardware that should still work.

The HPLIP package still operates my all in one printer just fine. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 4:56:25 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 29, 2013 4:58:48 PM PST
Or you could just order a system from Zareason or System76.... I guess...

I wouldn't just replace a working computer to replace the OS, but if your existing system is decrepit and due for a replacement anyway (Probably anything that dates back to before 2003 or so), it may be worth it to just start out with a system that does things right the first time rather than trying to wedge a decent OS onto a system that was built by cost-cutters in the Windows XP era.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 5:00:47 PM PST
gapperguy says:
Funny, I've got no problems with Windows 8 Pro and all my hardware including an all in one printer are working just fine.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 5:03:18 PM PST
Well, I should step back for a minute, I suppose.

There is one way HP can still get you for a new printer. They can stop making cartridges for the old printer. I finally had to throw out a printer from 2001 around 2008 or so and figured that I may as well just get an all in one while I was at it.

I may not do that again, because some of them are introducing an anti-feature into the printer firmware (the software that runs on the printer itself) that will cause it to refuse to scan or fax anything if you're out of ink.... Yeah...

Mine doesn't do that, but thanks to the whole "internet of things" BS, the newer models could add that later and force the "upgrade" on you to the new firmware that does that.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 5:04:39 PM PST
quote: Funny, I've got no problems with Windows 8 Pro and all my hardware including an all in one printer are working just fine.

hmmm, yea, funny, I dont think anyone on this thread was claiming all hardware won't work with Windows 8. I just noted I have an expensive scanner that doesn't work with it, and that's because Canon won't update the drivers.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 5:06:25 PM PST
Some manufacturers *do* upgrade their drivers and fix bugs and support new versions of Windows, and pay Microsoft $500 a year to sign their new drivers, many MANY others don't. You're at the mercy of their whim, just as when you depend on any other proprietary software.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 5:06:59 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 29, 2013 5:12:25 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 29, 2013 5:14:07 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 5:41:47 PM PST
Disco says:
The way you carry on are you sure you aren't 17 now? If you don't like Widows 8 just don't buy it. No sense working yourself into a foaming mouth rant over it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 5:44:49 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 29, 2013 5:53:54 PM PST
Bryan S says:
I really like MS-Dos 6.22, but seems there is no support for it! On the serious note I don't like the idiot-interface of Win8, Windows7 is ok, didn't like Vista compared to Xp SP3. I wouldn't upgrade to Win8 when they are charging $125 to downgrade to Win7.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 6:06:21 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 29, 2013 6:11:01 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 6:12:46 PM PST
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Posted on Jan 29, 2013 6:13:38 PM PST
The user reviews of Win8 are in and they are not good. There is no reason to go from Win 7 to 8 now, and even less after the price is raised.

Poor choice, MS.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 6:17:01 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 6:39:26 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 29, 2013 6:43:18 PM PST
Well, regarding price, piracy is built into their business model. It goes on as long as they tolerate it. If they clamped down today, they'd lose half their users to GNU/Linux tomorrow. Because Windows isn't worth $150 or more to most users who see the real price up front. They have the ability to detect and shut down any pirated copy of Windows they want to deactivate. It doesn't even really have to be pirated. Before the invasion of Iraq, the US government had Microsoft shut down Iraq's computers that were running Windows.

To Microsoft, tolerating piracy would be like an airline that price gouges, but allows enough passengers to sneak onboard without paying to fill up the empty seats, just in case they'd think about going to a competitor.

Eventually, the idea is that you starve the competitor anyway, and it doesn't matter if they had better deals because people could get your product "for free", and that sucked the air out of the market for competition.

"We'll figure out how to get them to pay in the next decade" - Bill Gates on China in the 90s.

Well, Free Software (as in freedom) can go on without a lot of paying users because it doesn't cost much of anything to compile and distribute. If you have a few users that pay for support (Red Hat/SUSE/Ubuntu) or buy a few applications from your software store (Ubuntu), you can afford to let everyone else just keep using it for free, and that's OK.

(Of course there are community distributions that aren't there to make money in the first place and if the donation box covers the bandwidth costs and hosting fees, it goes on. Again, you can have most people not pay anything and go on just fine.)

The point of Free Software is that it's intended to be a social movement. It's there to correct the market abuses that proprietary software inflicts on its victims.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 29, 2013 7:29:42 PM PST
gapperguy says:
I've seen many negative reviews. The features are there and you just need to learn some new ways of doing things. Honestly, it took me at least 2 weeks to warm up to Windows 8. Now, I know what I'm doing and it's fine.
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Discussion in:  Gold Box forum
Participants:  21
Total posts:  162
Initial post:  Jan 29, 2013
Latest post:  Feb 3, 2013

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