Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on March 29, 2013
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I've read many books about the Dakota War, and all of those cited by Mr. Berg. 38 Nooses is by far the most readable book I've read on this subject, and that is saying a lot because I've enjoyed most of them, and found the majority to be very informative. Mr. Berg blends wonderfully detailed historical facts taken from a variety of primary sources with a style of writing that flows nicely. The reader is able to picture the events of this bloody conflict in way I've seldom found in non-fiction books. Anyone with any interest at all in this topic will not be bored, therefore allowing the importance of this chapter in our history to shine through. High schools should teach this topic using this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on January 5, 2013
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I've read dozens of Books on Lincoln, the Civil War, and the Indian conflicts yet had never heard this story. This intrigued me enough to give this book a try and I'm so glad that I did!

Berg's book reads like a novel while bringing out the facts regarding this conflict and looking at it from all of the different perspectives from that time. Personally, not really knowing the history made it a much better read for me as I turned each page in anticipation of what would happen next. Instead of comparing it to other works it was just a really entertaining and thought provoking look at some important but almost unknown history.

Berg does an excellent job of pointing out the facts while not getting bogged down in meaningless minutiae as many historians are prone to do. As good historical works also do it makes me want to dig even further into this chapter in US history.

I won't go into the facts of the conflict as I think not knowing them made this so much better for me. I'll just say that I am amazed at this history and really impressed with Berg's writing and his sense of what to include and edit out of a historical work.

This seems almost like a great Western movie with the Civil War looming in the background except for the fact that it is all true.

I'll just say if you thought you knew everything possible about Lincoln, The Civil War or the American Indian you probably will find some things in this work that you didn't know that will change your perspective on those subjects.

Just an excellent find in historical reading that I just can't praise enough.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on March 27, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
If you are interested in the Dakota Conflict of 1862, this is the book to choose as a primer. I wish this book had been around about 20 years ago when I started studying this "war" in earnest. No other book I have read in past years is so complete in dealing with the little details as well as the big picture. I thought I knew all the stories; this book showed me I did not. All participants in this episode of American history are treated with detached objectivity, some perhaps being granted more favorable treatment than they deserve, depending on your viewpoint, I suppose. Perhaps that is the sign of a good narrative: seeming to treat what I might consider to be the bad guys with more sympathy than they deserve, and not praising my favorites highly enough.

No knowledge of the second half of the 19th century in this country is complete without studying this episode.

Good job, Mr. Berg!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on January 21, 2013
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
The sweep of the American Frontier is in many ways the story of the sweeping away of the American Indian. Although Scott W. Berg does not use the term genocide in this new book it is the overall power of that crime that fills his pages. Here we learn of what I believe may be an event many readers have not heard of. That in 1862 during the hard fought early days of the Civil War a band of young Dakota warriors went on a killing spree in the new state of Minnesota savaging several hundred white settlers who happened to be living on land given the Dakota by treaty. Little Crow found he had little choice but to lead his tribe in rebellion. Six weeks later the war was over and over 300 Dakota were tried by a military tribunal and condemned to be hanged. Eventually charges for many were commuted by President Lincoln and only 38 Dakota were hung. A mistake lead to one Indian being hung despite the fact the President had commuted his sentence. This hanging became the largest mass execution in American history.

Much of the story hangs on the story of two individuals. The first being Sarah Wakefield who along with her Children became captives of the Dakota's. She was seen as an "Indian lover" by her fellow captives. Berg asks if this was truly the case. The other individual is Episcopal Bishop Henry Whipple who defended the Indian side of the story and met with Lincoln in an attempt to save the condemned from hanging. These two separate narratives elevate Berg's very interesting and somewhat sad and disturbing book.

The book does a great job weaving the reader back and forth from the Indian war in Minnesota and the Civil War battlefields indicating the Dakota Rebellion was a sideshow and distraction. When you read of the hate, the mistreatment, government corruption and lies and as Scott put's it the need for "private revenge" you are almost brought to tears that so many could have been so wrong, immoral, and unjustified all in the name of manifest destiny resulting in a deadly clash of cultures.

The Dakota uprising and what other Indian tribe's learned from watching Little Crow's destruction and his Dakota tribe's treatment such as the hanging, murder, and relocation lead to better inform future strong anti-settler Indian leaders like Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull. Always outnumbered and knowing they could never win they still would not bend to the will of history for over 40 more years. In the end they became players in Wild West Entertainments and as to the Frontier it was left with very few buffalo and Indians that got in the way of "progress". This is a grand book about an important small piece of the puzzle that no American should take lightly as just Frontier entertainment.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Great Book Very well written. Good balance between Civil War an Indian Wars. Would recommend it to anyone. A good page turner.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
So much of what's written about the history of US - Native American relations is biased to the point of being polemical rather than historical. That's changing - see 2009 Bancroft Prize winning "The Comanche Empire" by Pekka Hamalainen. Native Americans were hardly passive victims, but rather active and often times effective (if not ultimately outgunned) actors in a struggle for control over land and resources in North America. This book is a great read. One suspects that the author Berg struggles hard to control the impulse to scream "genocide". Regardless of his motivation, he has created an immensely readable and balanced account of the Dakota War of 1862. Using the story and words of captive Sarah Wakefield, along with Rev. Whipple and others, he blends the personal with the military/political/economic aspects of the conflict. It gives the book momentum, making it hard to stop reading in our eagerness to find out what happens to Little Crow, Wakefield, Chaska, Sibley, et. al. I'd like to have a beer with Berg to discuss his view of Lincoln in greater depth.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on February 24, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I'm torn after reading this one. I've read many stories about this incident and after seeing an entire book dedicated to it, I was excited. After reading it, I'm less than impressed. Either every other version of Little Crow's War I have read was vastly overstated, or this author is the epitome of understatement. He glosses over the actual details of the events and dedicates most of the book to linking Lincoln, the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation to the "Indian situation" in the Northwest. I thought the book was, in most places, very tedious and rambling. I've read a lot of the books on Native Americans and find that this story was much more closely tied to the coming conflicts with the Plains Indians than it was with the Civil War. Admittedly, I am much more interested in the "actions" of history than in the theory. Allowing for that, this book was especially hard for me to finish. If you're a Civil War buff, you'll probably find it very interesting. If you're more interested in the Indian Wars, you'll probably be disappointed.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on January 31, 2013
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
A good overview of the MN frontier and a little known Native American uprising. Mr. Lincln had his hands full with the Civil War and the Sioux had their hands full dealing with an unjust 19th century BIA. This is a well documented, well writen examination of a very tragic event in which the Indians, once again, come out on the short end. A very interesting book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on March 18, 2013
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I read all Native American history I can and this was one of the best I've read in awhile. This story should
be read by everyone, because almost no one is aware of this part of America's history. Well written, it keeps
you interested from cover to cover.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on February 11, 2013
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Scott Berg's account of how President Lincoln handled the Sioux uprising of 1862 in the midst of the Civil War sheds light not only on an important chapter of American history, but also adds luster to the remarkable image of our 16th President. Berg digs deep into the native American crisis and treats the Sioux with sensitivity without caving to the "politically correct" syndrome. They did, after all, butcher several hundred people. Berg uses the number 600 without explanation. President Lincoln said it was 800. Whatever the total, it was a terrible event, the bloodiest massacre in our history that set up the largest public execution in our history. History buffs all over owe it to themselves to learn this story, and they will find no better source than this brilliant book by Scott Berg.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Through Dakota Eyes: Narrative Accounts Of The Minnesota Indian War Of 1862
Through Dakota Eyes: Narrative Accounts Of The Minnesota Indian War Of 1862 by Gary Clayton Anderson (Paperback - July 15, 1988)
$14.19

The Dakota War of 1862: Minnesota's Other Civil War
The Dakota War of 1862: Minnesota's Other Civil War by Kenneth Carley (Paperback - July 15, 2001)
$18.29

Over the Earth I Come: The Great Sioux Uprising of 1862
Over the Earth I Come: The Great Sioux Uprising of 1862 by Duane P. Schultz (Paperback - June 15, 1993)
$14.55
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.