Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

105 of 109 people found the following review helpful
on September 25, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I've been running consistently (that is, more than three times per week and for at least twenty miles total) for over thirty years and have completed marathons, ultras, and Ironman triathlon distance races. Until I read this book, I wanted to have inspirational music plugged into my head and constantly searched for new play lists when the current one lost its magic to motivate. After reading this book, instead of seeking a mood created by music in order to have a good run, I now create my own mood or head out looking to see what I can find by being in the moment. There is enough on meditation in this book to quit looking for external stimulus in order to create internal motivation. You can create your own motivation and enjoy running (or any endurance event) without outside assistance beyond what you can perceive from your surroundings, whether in the woods or the city. This book is full of moments when I stopped reading to underline something and nod to myself. Very good read and excellent practical advice.

For an amazing read of what is possible in the realm of human endurance, check out The Marathon Monks of Mount Hiei.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
60 of 67 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I love Sakyong Mipham's other books and I bought this expecting to also like it for its insights into how our minds work. What I didn't expect was that within 15 minutes of picking it up, I would be lacing up my running shoes and heading out the door. I haven't run for over 6 months and thought, well maybe my running days are over. Now I know that they are--as a form of punishment. This book reopened the door to running as a joy. As I continue to read, the depth of the book continues to unfold. Yes, you can use it as a source of inspiration to take care of your body. You can read it as a primer on mindfulness and awareness. But you can also read it as a guide to creating happiness and peace within yourself. A surprisingly deep--but still quite pragmatic--book. Highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
The book isn't what I expected and hoped for. I wanted to read about how to meditate while running; how to focus my mind and keep it off thoughts of fatigue during endurance events. Instead, I would describe the book as somewhat of a compare and contrast between running and meditation. He describes how the pursuit of running can be justified and helpful for meditators. The author is very good at teaching meditation concepts and has an easy writing style. I did learn a few new insights about meditation. He describes running and gives anecdotal experiences from his own journey. The book, therefore, is good if you're already a meditator who's considering getting started in running, but isn't what I was looking for.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
33 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on January 16, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Having been a runner for 50 years and a meditator for 40, I was naturally interested in this book. My reaction after a first read was the same as I had with the author's other two books: nice, but simplistic. However, my experience with his first two books was that they somehow deepened upon subsequent readings. I gave this book another try, taking it with me on a week-long meditation retreat while I was recovering from a running injury. The advice in the book on healing from injury was helpful. More to my surprise, the book provided significant guidance on my meditation during retreat. As I have continued to re-read this book I have found my running has changed from being "good for me", driven, and slightly aversive, to being a relaxed and joyful experience that leaves me refreshed and relaxed. Oddly enough, my speed has increased. I subsequently used this book as meditation for hiking on a retreat I led in the Grand Canyon. Tiger instructions were very good for staying on the trail without falling, a must in the Canyon. Ascending Bright Angel trail at the end of a week, the Lion instructions were great for touching on panoramic awareness. What I have come to realize is that the author is very good at making profound insights accessible. A casual reading of his work may leave one with the impression that it is simplistic, but my experience has been that careful and continued attention to what he writes reveals a genius for writing on many levels of understanding at once, so that many people can benefit from what he says, and that most could benefit from reading it many times.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on May 1, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Running was my time to mentally check out, crank up the Ipod, and push our a few miles. Running with the Mind of Meditation brought richness to my running by learning to tune in to my breath instead of tuning out. The irony is that now my runs seem shorter and I cover many more miles injury free. This book teaches you how to enrich any exercise through strengthening your capacity for mindfulness and awareness.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on September 18, 2013
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
As a long-time runner and meditator, I was hoping to find a bit more substance to this book, especially after reading the Sakyong's hugely practical and helpful book, "Turning the Mind into an Ally." What I found was a bit of a puff piece on the general attitude of Buddhism sprinkled somewhat haphazardly with concrete tips on how to meditate and how to run. I believe the useful tips found throughout could probably be condensed to a single page.

This book is seemingly aimed at the novice to both Buddhism and Running, but still not as a satisfying how-to guide.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on April 16, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
As someone who is just beginning to run I found this book to be very inspiring and practical. The sections on Motivation and How to Deal with Pain are especially useful as I go through the inevitable difficulties of "building a base." When I am running and I find myself becoming distracted by worries and other thoughts, I remind myself of what I am doing in the present moment by repeating the author's words "movement is good for the body: stillness is good for the mind." It just feels very healthy.

Although the book recommends some form of exercise for everyone (walking, bicycling, swimming, etc.) the information contained within it is about how to live, not just how to exercise.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on May 30, 2013
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This book was a big disappointment to me in that it did not give me what I wanted and what I expected from the description and some of the positive reviews. It does have a lot of helpful information about meditation, and it helped me see for the first time the purpose behind focusing on the breath in meditation. Hence the three stars. I would probably like the author's other books more, the ones that are strictly about meditation. But I expected a book with specific and unique tips and techniques for what to do with your mind while running, and how to enjoy yourself more while running without an MP3. Granted, there is a little bit of this--a very little. The advice on that front is nothing that you haven't already thought of - focus on your breath, focus on your form, notice nature around you, run from signpost to signpost. And a great deal of general talk about mindfulness in all of life, which includes running. If you are considering buying the book for the purpose of enjoying running more without a MP3 player, don't bother.

The book does not seem to have a discernible structure, other than in part discussing various stages of meditation and running using animal metaphors, which personally left me flat and I found that aspect tedious. The author starts the book by saying that meditation and running are two separate things, and you don't meditate while you run. Then, throughout, the book jumps back and forth, randomly and pointlessly, between separately talking about meditation and talking about running, and the author's personal experiences with both.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
26 of 34 people found the following review helpful
on May 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful book for anyone who loves physical activity - and also for those of us learning to love it. It gives very practical instruction on how to expand awareness while going more deeply into synchronizing mind and body. I have bought 3 for friends already and they have all really enjoyed it.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on May 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I was curious to see how the author would weave together running and meditation since I've been doing both for many years. I found the book very easy to read, yet profound too. He gives many many tips on ways to bring more depth and meaning into running so it becomes a spiritual practice that synchronizes mind and body rather than just an obligation that we want to get done. I also think many principles in the book would apply to any type of movement - walking, swimming cycling etc. Its about being present no matter what we are doing and setting an intention so that more meaning is found in these activities.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed

Turning the Mind Into an Ally
Turning the Mind Into an Ally by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche (Paperback - January 6, 2004)
$13.49

The Runner's Guide to the Meaning of Life
The Runner's Guide to the Meaning of Life by Amby Burfoot (Turtleback - November 17, 2007)
$9.72
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.