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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on December 24, 2001
This book is absolutely packed with almost everything a language student could need. As it lists, there are five hundred one verbs, all arranged alphabetically throughout the book. It lists each verb in its seven simple tenses (present indicative, imperfect, past absolute, future, present conditional, present subjunctive, and imperfect subjunctive) and its seven compound tenses (present perfect, past perfect, past anterior, future perfect, past conditional, past subjunctive, and past perfect subjunctive). It has a page on pronunciation of Italian vowels and consonants, and then it goes into talking about how to conjugate the verbs. It begins with showing how to conjugate regular verbs, following this with the Italian translations of each tense's and mood's name. An example conjugation of an English verb is then shown to help illustrate what each tense means. After this comes further explanation of the verbs' tenses and moods, in which it deals with each of the fourteen given tenses. It simplifies the regular conjugation endings after this by showing what is taken away and added to each infinitive for each tense. Then finally come the five hundred one verbs, each one with at least two example sentences to help the reader understand its usage. Afterward comes a section on verbs which take a preposition, a list of phrases in Italian for dealing with everyday situation, days, months, how to count to 100, currency, weights, measures, temperatures, and clothing measurements. Lastly come two indices dealing with the verbs: first the index about irregular forms commonly found in the language, matching them with the verb from which they are inflected; then comes the index of English-Italian verbs as a cross-reference. This is an awesome choice to not be overlooked. Glancing through the book every so often will help to increase your vocabulary, and if you stick to a plan of learning so many verbs a day/week, you'll be learning them even more quickly. It's a simple and awesome book that any student or teacher would enjoy and appreciate.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on July 4, 2006
I agree with the reviews below: this is a fabulous collection of verb paradigms for both learning and reference. But a significant flaw is that neither the word stress nor the quality of the stressed vowels are indicated.

The stress on the present tense of italian verbs (and some infinitives) is not predictable from its orthorgraphy and it may appear on either the penult or the antepenult of a verb. Such information is necessary in order for a learner to acquire a correct pronunciation, and it is missing in this book.

Moreover, a stressed "e" or "o" may be pronounced either open or close in Italian verbs in the present tense and in some irregular past-tense and past-participle forms; but in this book, there is no indication of a preferred pronunciation. Such information would be of great intrest to a learner who wanted to develop a native-like accent.

In order to find information regarding verb stress and vowel quality, a learner would need to consult a second dictionary.

As an alternative, I would recommend, at least for starters, the trade paperback called "200 Italian Verbs" by Barnes and Noble. Although it is limited to 200 verbs, the stress is conveniently indicated by an acute accent on verbs with close "e" and "o" and by a grave accent on verbs with open "e" and "o". This publication is out of print but still available on line for under five dollars from used-book sellers.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2009
I have the print version of this book, and was excited to see it in the Kindle version.
I was so disappointed to find that the text on the pages showing the verb conjugations is too tiny to read! Imagine a screen capture of the printed page reduced to fit on a Kindle. The text sizing feature doesn't work on these pages.
I tried using strong reading glasses (magnifiers) to see the text, but it is too small and faint. I was hoping to be able to study on the go, without lugging the full-sized printed copy, but this won't work!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2000
This book was very helpful for the Beginner to Intermediate. A constant source for reference as well as for "pulling together" the thousands of idioms and related vocabulary which is helpful only if you can use the verb correctly. A basic and a must for Italian studenti! I lost my copy to my professor and had to buy another one. A great value.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on October 3, 2010
On a kindle, this dictionary is completely useless because you can't read the conjugated forms of the verbs on their simply photocopied book pages. Can't make it bigger either. I am amazed that Amazon marks this as a kindle edition, any customer will feel cheated, and i believe that Amazon should refund anybody asking for it.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on September 14, 2005
I'm an Italian fifteen boy and I love foreign languages. I think Italian verbs are very difficult for english people, cos' verbs change during the coniugation (like: io vado, tu vai egli va, noi andiamo, voi andate, essi vanno). I think 501 verbs are a lot!

I've found an error in the ABBRONZARE pages. Don't say TI PIACE ABBRONZARE? but TI PIACE ABBRONZARTI? and it's wrong also NON ABBRONZARE TROPPO!, that's NON TI ABBRONZARE TROPPO!

It's a good support to every course.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on May 20, 2004
This guide got me through my first year of Italian studies, with almost all of the verbs (and definitely all the tenses) I needed for basic composition and conversation. Certain verbs are missing, and the names of the tenses are in English (all students I know learn the names of the tenses in Italian; I had to read the guide in the beginning of the book to figure out what I wanted). This book worked through Beginning Italian I & II, but a more comprehensive guide is needed for Intermediate levels.
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26 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on March 25, 1998
This book leaves out accents. For examples, take the verb abitare. In the pres. ind. this verb is accented as such: Abito, Abiti, Abita, abitiAmo, abitAte, Abitano. Unlike some of the other Romance languages, typically Italian only accents words having a stress on the last syllable, e.g., società. Therefore, the authors of this book should have used some means to indicate where the stress falls in various verbs deviating from the rule that the word is stressed on the penult. This is a serious fault with this type of work!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on July 12, 2009
I am currently learning italian and I thought getting this kindle book would be an excellent tool. But you can't read the verb conjugations because they a tiny and gray. I am very dissapointed.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on January 13, 2009
My review of this book might be better if I'd started using it when I was first given it, before I'd learned much about the language. It does fully conjugate 501 verbs which can be of real value when learning to speak. However, pronunciation aids are missing (as others have noted) and I feel that this book loses all its value once you understand how to conjugate regular verbs. Italian verbs end in -are -ere -ire -orre -urre and in most cases the conjugations are identical for each verb of a particular ending. The real issue is when you come across irregular verbs like "fare" (to do) which don't follow the normal rules. The number of regular verbs far outstrips the number of irregular verbs. The selection of verbs in this book is also a little suspect as the regular verb "to gnaw" can be found but "to remember" and "to forget" are missing. So if you find yourself lost in the country and unable to ask who remembers the way back (or why the map is missing from your bag, or even if your buddy likes the view), not to worry, you can still fill time talking about the squirrel and his acorn. In my opinion, this book would be of vastly more use if it explained the regular conjugations then simply listed regular verbs, and left the full conjugations to irregular verbs. Reflexive verbs like vergognarsi (to be embarrassed) are also in short supply. Granted, these usually follow the rules (once you know what the rules are), but I had turned to the book to find out how to properly use "ho dimenticato" versus "mi sono dimenticato" (I forgot), but found no help.
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