How to Test Almost Everything Electronic
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2010
If your looking for a good introduction to trouble shooting with the how to use test equipment in circuits, this is it. I bought four
books on the subject at the same time and found this book and Electronic Trouble shooting by Tomal and Wimer to be the clear winners.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on March 13, 2008
My goal is circuit troubleshooting communication gear. There is one terrific idea in this book that is worth far more than what I paid. There is a very simple circuit to use in conjunction with an oscilloscope that proves to be a super way to test components. Buy this book one for that alone.
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45 of 54 people found the following review helpful
on November 8, 2005
Doesn't cover a whole bunch, but does make for good bathroom reading. Good beginnner book. The section on DIODE TESTING has a mistake. Horn has the diode discription and schematic symbol completely backwards. Good starter book nonetheless.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2010
OK, so I'm new to electronics. But for this not being a reference book, I sure learned a lot. Not just about electronics, but some really useful things. Like how to not blow up caps when you test them. There's a lot of good info here for a novice like me. Well done.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2010
Great book,very easy to understand, a technician can't do without.It helps me a lot to review what I have learnt 20 year ago without having to deal with the math etc.
worth every penny.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on July 4, 2010
Purchased book used. Advertised as in "good condition" on Amazon. In actuality, the book is in excellent condition. Although, somewhat dated, copyright 1993, it now could be retitled, "How to Test Not So Much Everything Electronic", it does contain much useful information. I am especially happy with the current test methods outlined for power supplies and transistor bias.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on October 21, 2010
This book is filled with practical knowledge! Applicable immediately to whatever you are trying to fix. There are a lot of "quick and dirty" test circuits to build that will help you diagnose and troubleshoot circuits.

Only a few chapters into the book I already see it's potential. I only wish there was an updated version covering some of the newer electronic devices. Very useful to the hobbyist as well!!

Cheers!

review date 10-21-2010
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on January 14, 2009
This book is less than I expected. I wish it had more about multimeters and testing automotive systems. It is also more. It shows how to build certain circuits for use in testing, but I don't think I would use them.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on July 28, 2011
This is clearly the best book I have seen yet on electronic repair. Last updated in 1993 so unfortunately still discusses obsolete technology like VCR and CRTs. Also a problem is that the author pretty much says you are crazy if you try to do a repair without a schematic. Well these days what company offers schematic diagrams? Other problem is that the books binding is really poor. The pages come loose almost immediately. Despite these issues the book is well written with diagrams where needed and just the right amount of theory to balance things out.
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on April 11, 2014
There is useful information in this book, but there are also too many areas that could be confusing or misleading to a beginner.
In one section, the author refers to using a fresh battery as a [somewhat] standard voltage source. It is true that this is commonly done and can be useful, but it is written that a fresh battery such as an AA cell should put out a certain voltage, and the next chapter gives a different voltage to use for the same cell reference. He should have specified that one is probably for a carbon zinc cell, and the other is likely for Alkaline.

There are some illustrations that do not match up with the text, and are apparently intended for a different chapter, but are printed out of place. The proof reader(s) should have caught that.

There is reference to finding wattage consumed by a device by measuring the voltage and the current and mulitplying those together to get the wattage--but it is unclear that this only works for a resistive load.

The part that really caught my eye was the opening paragraph in the chapter on circuit testing using an oscilloscope.
The author states that the typical service grade oscilloscope cannot be used to measure voltage of a circuit directly, and a the voltage of a signal on the oscilloscope screen can only be determined by comparing it to a known signal voltage from a "calibrator." I had to read this twice to make sure I was understanding what was intended by this statement. Apparently, the author was thinking of the very earliest "oscillographs" from the 1930's or 1940's, which had no means of setting internal calibration of the vertical amplifier, nor a divided graticul reference on the screen. This is the only thing I can think of that might have been meant by this paragraph. A "service grade" oscilloscope is, in reality, used for measuring voltage and frequency directly as well as just "looking" at the signal waveform on the screen...at least any typical 'scope made in the last 60-70 years.

There is reference to digital multimeters (DMMs) having a typical input [DC] impedance of 1M ohm per volt, as if they were the same as an analog VOM in circuit structure. I personally have never seen a DMM that had this impedance characteristic that was variable with voltage setting. Typically, they are 10M ohm DC input imedance no matter what voltage setting they are on. All meters vary in design and impedance, but I believe the book's statement to be atypical and fundamentally incorrect or--at least--outdated.

My opinions.
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