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146 of 152 people found the following review helpful
on November 29, 2005
I recently made a career change into the culinary world, and this knife remains my favorite after 6 months of heavy use and abuse. Whether I'm slicing a cake, carving a turkey, or chopping mushrooms, this is the knife I reach for first. (It's also the knife the other cooks want to borrow most often.)

Most importantly, the knife is extremely sharp - I remember opening the package and finding a knife that was literally razor-sharp. I sharpen it at least once a day, and it seems to re-sharpen more quickly and stay sharp longer than my other knives.

Secondly, the handle it terrific. It is ergonomically shaped and is made of a hardened rubber material, so it is much easier to grip than knives with handles of metal, wood, phenolic compound, etc... (you'll really appreciate the handle when dealing with slippery items such as raw chicken or fish).

Finally, the blade itself is nice and wide, so you can use it as a scoop to shuttle ingredients to and from your cutting board.

The one possible drawback is the weight of the knife - it doesn't have the heft of other knives I've used. However, some people may actually appreciate the lighter weight.

Can you find a better knife out there? Yes, but you'll have to pay upwards of $100 (and sometime MUCH more) for it. In my book, the price/performance ratio of this knife warrant 5 stars.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on October 29, 2006
I've had this knife for several years now and it's one of my 2 favorites. I,in fact, have 2 of them, one in the house and one in our RV.This knIfe has an excellent blade that sharpens well (I use an Edgepro sharpener) and maintains that edge over time. I have a set of Cutco and some Chicago Cutlery knives and none of them compare with the Forschner. I have several different Forschner knives and all of them are excellent. You'd have to spend considerably more to find a comparable knife. My other favorite, by the way, is a handmade chef's knife crafted by a fellow in Oregon from old sawmill saw blades. A wonderful, hefty knife. Try a Forschner, you won't be sorry.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2008
It doesn't have the heft or the feeling of luxury that I get from something like Henkels, but it has a nice, rigid blade, decent balance, comfortable grip, and it cuts nicely. Very easy to keep sharp with a steel. In other words, it is functionally absolutely correct, if not luxurious.

For 1/3 the price, I'll skip luxurious. This is my traveling knife for cooking while visiting friends with less-well-equipped kitchens or doing demos (in my home kitchen, I have a mix of Henkels, Wuesthoff, and some Chinese cleavers), and I'll certainly add a few others to my kit.

Highly recommended for the price.
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53 of 62 people found the following review helpful
on January 14, 2006
I received this knife as a Christmas present and so far, I am pleased. What struck me first about this knife is how wonderfully sharp it is. I also own a Wusthoff Santoku (which I love, too) and this knife was just as sharp right out of the box as the Wusthoff was. It is rather comfortable in the hand and the shape of the blade allows for very smooth rocking and chopping action, which is wonderful when you are chopping vegetables. It is also wonderful for carving meats, with its long sharp blade. The grip is slightly larger than I would like, making it a bit more cumbersome to hold than my Wusthoff, but that is not a big issue for me considering the price point of this knife. If price were not an issue and I had to choose between a Wusthoff and a Forschner Fibrox, then I would probably choose a Wusthoff. But being that a Wusthoff of this size would be at least $50 more, then price does come to play. If money is no object, then choose the wonderful German steel of a Wusthoff or look into the Japanese steel of a Shun. But if you are like most of us and have to consider price, then I do believe you will be happy with a Forschner Fibrox Chef's Knife.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on December 22, 2007
This Knife is a classic used in a great many restaurant and institutional kitchens by pro's-like me who may have it in hand 4+ hours a day 5 days a week. As sharp as it is out of the box...if you are good with a stone it can get sharper.

Try this. Rest the knife on the counter edge up. Drop a ripe black olive onto the edge from about 12". If a knife is REALLY sharp....the olive is impaled on the blade half sliced by just it's own weight. A knife CAN be sharp enough to shave..and yet you try the olive test-and the olive bounces off. My Forschner passed the test...or I re-steeled it. Most knives I have encountered could NEVER pass the olive test. I'd like to someday work on a Global,see what it can achieve. A co-worker's Global (way more $) was the only knife I ever got to use that felt about as sharp. Generally a forged blade-while strong-is a bit thick to get the acute angled edge.

In commercial kitchens I often have the use of a Norton triple stone,and with those you can lay down a really low angled edge then do a working bevel on the fine India stone,steel it and it's job ready.

If you cut/chop/slice in volume...you want a knife that is quick and comfortable,not heavy or sluggish or too tiny. You also want a knife you don't need to pamper and one you don't need to guard like it cost 2 days wages. This is it.
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88 of 108 people found the following review helpful
on August 20, 2009
I will start off by saying this is a good knife. For less than 70 dollars, you cant get much better. It has a comfortable handle and probably the sharpest blade(for a german profile and steel knife) out of the box; however, it has a few drawbacks. Even with proper care and maintenance( hand washing, proper storage, steeling) it will dull with moderate use in less than a few months. If you have proper sharpening equipment and do it correctly, this isn't much of a problem, as it is easy to sharpen. Some people claim that this is the absolute best knife out there, even compared to the lighter, better balanced, sharper, and longer lasting edgewise Japanese knives.(I'm not just talking about globals and shuns) If you are willing to spend more you can get many better knives from makers such as torijo, misono, massamoto, and mac. If you are looking for a great bargain, good solid knife for home use, this is pretty darn good, but not the best.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on December 25, 2008
I'm not a professional chef and I don't use my knives to make a living, so my review is only based on my home cooking use. I was faced with rebuilding my kitchen essentials and I needed some decent kitchen knives at a reasonable price. After doing much research I decided to try the Forschner knives, and I'm awfully glad I did.

These are the best knives I have ever used. I will grant that I've never been able to afford and have never used the very top end, top brand knives, but I have used a wide variety over my many years. In the past, if the blade was good, the handle was awful, and vice versa. With this knife, I was completely satisfied with the edge right out of the package and it has been easy to keep sharp. The handle design fits my particular hand like a glove.

The ten inch knife is almost more knife than I need, as a rule. I also have the 8-Inch Chef's Knife and find myself reaching for that knife first. Then again, I have a very small kitchen with a limited workspace and though it may sound goofy, the smaller knife is easier to use in the space I have. Having said that, if the eight-inch is waiting to be washed I have no qualms about grabbing the ten-inch and chopping away. While I suspect that someone who does a lot of heavy duty cutting of heavy items might like a heftier knife with a wider back, I haven't had occasion to need it.

I like the fact that I don't have to worry about maintaining a fancy handle. The only problem I have with the care of these knives is not cutting myself while washing them. Highly recommended.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on November 15, 2009
america's test kitchen, a/k/a cook's illustrated, rates this knife as the best one around (for the price), but they're talking about the 8 inch version. if you can handle a knife, you want this knife in the 10 inch version. bottom line is that the 10 inch version makes shorter work of every project, and especially the ones that involve prepping whole vegetables like cauliflower or squash that are simply bigger than what an 8 inch knife can handle in one slice (you know, that whole "economy of motion" thing). anyway, this knife is truly indispensible, and unbelievably cheap. don't waste your money on anything else.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on January 27, 2008
I have been using a 10" Dexter carbon steel cook's knife(over 50 years old/belonged to my grandfather)It is thin, sharp and has enough flex in the blade to filet and skin fish easily yet it also handles hard vegetables without complaints. It does, however get a metallic smell and taste when cutting very acidic foods. I wanted to try a good stainless modern version of similar design. The Forschner is substantially thicker, stiffer and the handle is, of coarse, quite different. The blade is about 1/4" longer and relatively close in profile. That said, it is very well made, sharp and balances easily using a slightly different grip to accomodate the chunky handle. I feel the quality of its performance far exceeds the pricetag for general kitchen use. It came with a carefully polished edge and has maintained it well so far. I have no reservations about recommending this knife. My Dexter will stay on my cutting board for carving and filleting,but the Forschner will now have a place as well.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
While starting life as a graduate student, I made the decision to get more serious about cooking to eat better and save money. A functional kitchen begins with quality cookware and a good set of knives; toward that end, I considered purchasing several of Victorinox's knife sets:
Victorinox 46892 Fibrox 3-Piece Chef's Knife Set
Victorinox 8-Piece Knife Block Set
Victorinox 7-Piece Knife Block Set
Victorinox Swiss Classic 15-Piece Cutlery Block Set

In the end I found that, at Amazon's heavily-discounted prices, it's just as economical to construct a 'custom set' by purchasing the knives individually. This also ensures that you get exactly what you want, and you don't waste money on knives that you don't want or need.

In the end, I purchased:
Victorinox 40521 10-Inch Chef's Knife, Black Fibrox Handle
Victorinox Fibrox 7-Inch Granton Edge Santoku Knife
Victorinox 5-Inch Mini-Chef's Knife with Fibrox Handle
Victorinox Honing Steel 12-Inch Round Regular Cut, Black Plastic Handle
Henckels 20-Slot Super Knife Storage Block

All of these products are very highly reviewed, and together they form an excellent introductory knife collection at a reasonable price.

This 10" Chef's Knife is definitely the workhorse of the set. While its large size is rather intimidating, it is incredibly light and very easy to handle. The cutting edge is amazingly sharp and, when cared for properly with handwashing and regular honing on a quality steel, it maintains its edge extraordinarily well. This knife far exceeds the quality of anything you will find in a brick-and-mortar store at a similar price point. While I'm sure that you could spend $100+ on a professional forged chef's knife that would perform better, this product more than meets the needs of the typical at-home cooking hobbyist.
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