Customer Reviews

188
4.3 out of 5 stars
PORTER-CABLE 4212 12-Inch Deluxe Dovetail Jig
Price:$157.99 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

189 of 193 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
I purchased the P-C 4212 jig primarily to help me make drawers quickly and accurately. Before buying it I was worried that the jig would be too fussy or time consuming to set up properly, or that it might not make good joints. After reading lots of reviews I decided to take the plunge and I am happy to say that my fears were mostly unwarranted. So far the performance of this jig has been excellent. The manual is well written and the instructions are easy to follow and precise. By taking my time and following the steps to the letter, I made near perfect half-blind dovetails on my first try. With a bit of troubleshooting and tweaking (which are explained in the manual), I soon had great looking joints coming from this thing.

One word of advice, every cut made with this jig must be backed up or you will get some serious blowout from the router bit exiting the rear of the board. In a normal operation such as making half blind dovetails, the pin board and the tail board are clamped together in the jig to provide this support, but remember that since they are offset, the last "tail" cut is not backed and will blowout if you don't add a scrap board to back it up. Also, don't forget to go to the P-C website and download the advanced joint manual. It really explains all of the fancy joints you can accomplish with this jig.

Overall, I am very pleased with this purchase, both from a performance and value-for-the-dollar standpoint.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
177 of 184 people found the following review helpful
on February 1, 2005
Verified Purchase
I bought this jig several weeks ago. It was easy to set up and use. To date I have only made half blind dovetail joints. Everything worked fine. I felt the manual was not as clear as it could have been but after a few mistakes I was able to make flawless joints. The quality of the unit appears to be quite good. Nothing flimsy or cheap. I was attracted to the carbided tipped bits but a little concerned that I may find a delay in getting the 'custom' PC bits if something happens to the original bits (I notice that Amazon does not offer the bits for sale yet!). I am a little concerned that PC did not provide lock nuts for the templet stops but, surprisingly, the set nuts have not wandered from their set points. Also, the knobs that set the tension position on the material clamps have a tendency to loosen up and if one is not careful the material may not be secured as tight as it should be. Finally, it would have been nice if PC had put the part numbers on the templets so that a novice could easlily identify them. Overall, a good product at a reasonable price.

Since I originally reviewed this item I have read where many other people have had almost no success in obtaining the dovetail bits for this unit. I have also learned that PC and Delta are now being bought out by DeWalt on 4/1/05 which might only add to the difficulty (at least temporarily) of getting these bits. Fortunately, I called PC and they sent me to their distributor in Atlanta which had 8 of the 43776PC bits. You can reach them at 404-608-0006.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
101 of 103 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2005
First let me tell you what NOT to buy. I first bought the Craftsman Professional Dovetail Fixture. (...) What a piece of crap! Cheap plastic, difficult to adjust accurately. I spent an afternoon and two evenings trying to get it right, and never was successful. Returned it to Sears and ordered the PC 4212. What a difference. Solid steel, easy to use. After an hour of setup and familiarization, gave it a try with some scrap and it worked perfectly. Emboldened, I made a drawer. Perfect on the first try. To those concerned about the PC router bits, I notice that Home Depot in our area is now carrying a complete line of PC router bits. Bottom line, I am very pleased with this jig.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
71 of 73 people found the following review helpful
on January 13, 2008
Verified Purchase
Jan'2008

I'll preface this by saying this is the first DT jig I've used. Everyone I know says that once you get it setup and use a dedicated router that it will product 100's of perfect joints. I'm hoping so.

I was having a hard time getting it to produce a good half blind DT. Gave up after 2.5 hours and several feet of wood. Came back the next day looking for why and found the left offset guide was bad. The offset guide keeps the tail (vertical) board 1/2" to the right of the pin (horizontal) board. The two guide edges were not parrallel. A few wacks with a hammer in a metal vice got it close. Some masking tape took care of the rest. PC says the part is on backorder till JUNE!!! I have to wait 6 months to get a critical part?

The next problem is the offset guide hold down mechanism which is one hex bolt. It does not force the guide edges to be 90 degrees to the template. In fact, when you tighten the bolt it puts clockwise pressure on the guide taking it out of square to the template. To correct this I used a machinists square against the template ) to get it right. Easily doable but should have been in the instructions or used a better design. The PC tech I talked with suggested putting a washer under the bolt head to reduce the twisting action.

The third issue is the template.

The template is fastened to the face and unsupported in the back. using a Wixey angle guage I found it is slanted amlost 2 degrees to the back. A little bending fixed that.

Also, the the template was bowed up in the middle of the front by 1/32". I cautiously bent it back down in the middle. The other thing I think helped was to put hand pressure on the front MIDDLE of the template when tightening it's fasterners (place boards under each end). The manual shows and directs you to use hand pressure on the ends. Even worse it shows putting the pressure on the rear of the template which probably caused the slant to the rear. With these two changes I can seat a tail board right up to the template and have it level with the pin board - hurray!!!

I'm very close to getting a tight HB DT, expect to have it today. But I am not happy with having wasted so much time and a 6 month backorder for a defective part.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
55 of 58 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon March 6, 2009
When I first got interested in wood work the whole idea of dovetail joints was very compelling. It is kind of what defines furniture and cabinet making, the focal point for many people. "Ooh, dovetail joints..." they exclaim when they open a drawer. I imagine zillions of dollars are spent every year on dovetail-making tools.

The Porter-Cable 4212 is a solid, mid-level dovetail jig. It makes excellent joints, but only the standard evenly-spaced variety. The more expensive brands with adjustable fingers will make random joints that look hand-made (sort of). They will also allow for different spacing for drawer fronts and rears, a common design.

The PC is solid and well-made, far more substantial and better designed than the budget models I have seen and used. The price is fair for what you get.

Some reviewers have complained about less than perfect components. All tools made for the garage workshop must be adjusted, checked, rechecked and sometimes tweaked. If you are going to do nice work on a semblance of a budget, you just have to "tune" all of your tools.

The manual really is not very good. The photos are murky and don't show the details they are supposed to. Simple line drawings would have been better. The text is all over the place and topics appear to be randomly placed on the pages. The Super Collider manual is probably easier to figure out.

I do not like the proprietary router bits. That is not doing the consumer any favors. Amazon does not even sell them. Check with Google to see how far away these thing are. I had to drive 20 miles to a specialty woodworking place to get one, and paid dearly for it.

This jig has no dust collection system. Expect a shop full of dust. You will be absolutely covered in dust and chips. You will have to wear real eye protection, the best mask possible and ear protection. This is all uncomfortable stuff. We all hate it, but you will be sorry, or worse, if you don't. You might as well go out and get the best and most comfortable protection possible or you will just be miserable.

Things that may help you work with this jig (and maybe others):

1. Making dovetails is an extremely precise endeavor, perhaps the most close-tolerance thing you will do in making furniture and such. You have to measure and re-measure, work slowly and recheck every setting at regular intervals. One change in the way the boards are clamped in or the adjustment of the router leads to disaster. The manual even says that a one degree deviation from square will ruin things.

2. Practice on scrap wood of the same exact thickness as your final project.

3. It does not hurt to mill up a couple of extra boards in case you screw up and have to re-do something.

4. Fluted dovetail bits, not the straight ones, act like wedges and tend to pull down and out of the router, or put a strain on the depth adjustment. You have to really crank down on the clamping nut. And it may still pull out.

5. You will have less of this pulling if the bit is sharp. Get it over with and buy spares. Figure at least one dovetail bit per 10 or more ply drawer sets. This is not an inexpensive hobby or job, so don't try to save $25 by using dull bits. New, sharp bits are a requirement for doing this properly!

6. To make sure your bit depth is constant for the entire project, score a line with the dovetail bit the whole width of the drawer side before you plunge it into the slots to actually cut out the slots. This acts like a reference line that allows you to see if the bit is getting out of adjustment so you can stop before any big damage is done. You have to actually see this, so you have to kneel down to eye level. This makes the eye protection mentioned above all the more important.

7. Putting a little silicon spray on a rag and wiping the top guide and the router base will make it easier to slide around. Don't get any silicon on the wood, hence the rag and not a direct spray. The plastic router base does not slide on the aluminum very well.

8. Try, try, try to not use plywood. Routing dovetails in plywood is not a fun or satisfying experience. It is a nasty splintery product that is simply not suitable for this at all. I bought some "drawer grade" ply that had a reasonably attractive finish. I found that even this "specialized" product was awful stuff, almost impossible to use. The veneer was actually thinner than paper, amazing that this is possible.

I guess I won't get an invite to the Plywood Cartel Association Gala Ball, but this is a product that is best used for structural sheathing and boarding up vacant buildings.

Try to use actual wood. It isn't all that hard to get boards down to a half-inch, it looks better and it is a far more satisfying experience. You don't have to hide the edges, either, so you save that time. The bits last far longer, too.

Lastly, think about not using a jig at all. The occasional small drawer project can be done by hand just as well. All you need is a chisel and a dovetail saw. And, as your mother will tell you, it is good for you.

I'll bet those old cabinet makers could chop out a drawer or three in less time than it takes to set up, test and then finally turn out machined joints. The couple of old dressers I have use clearly hand-made dovetail joints. They used hand-made dovetails on an assembly line when machine tools were readily available. It was probably faster. Today, they would use a computer-controlled mill to make them and they would be absolutely perfect.

Interestingly, the quality of the joints is less than what many people would expect. They clearly were done quickly. They are a fine way to hold things together for a few hundred years, but would never make it to the cover of a woodworker magazine. So, think about the need for absolute and total perfection on some of your projects.

So, I recommend a jig only if you are going to make an entire set of kitchen drawers, or more.

Even then, look into the excellent modern manufactured metal drawer systems by Blum and others. You just add simple wood, or other material, rectangles and get options like full-extension, soft-close sliders as well. This is a super high-end way to go and will that cost you more than buying jigs, routers, real wood, nice sliders, etc?

Also, there are custom, pre-made drawers available through catalogues. Their dovetails are obviously made with expensive machinery and are perfect. Again, this may be cheaper and better. You can add your own fronts and concentrate your efforts on what shows.

This review began with the allure of dovetail joints. I snuck into a high-end, appointment-only cabinet "studio" and played with all the drawers. Not a dovetail in sight. Is this the end of them, or is it an opportunity to make stuff that is more distinctive that what even rich people enjoy in their $200K designer kitchens?

I went the dovetail route for my kitchen re-do, even made ply look good (I have impressive hacking skills thanks to having terrible or no tools for most of my life). If someone opens a drawer they will see dovetails and the too-expensive sliders will ease it back with impressive precision. The 4212 is about the least expensive way to do this with about about as much ease as a garage-shop woodworker can expect.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on January 27, 2005
I really like the fit and finish of this jig. I have nothing else to compare it to, however, this piece is very well made. The templates are solid and the clamps hold strong. I have only used it to make half blind dovetails and the first ones fit perfect. The depth stop and template alignment lines are great. There was no adjustments needed. Just clamp the work pieces in, align the template and set the bit depth and you have a perfect cut. The only reason that it is not five stars is the fact the bits are Porter Cable proprietary bits.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
on May 24, 2005
Well this is the first dovetail jig I have owned.

After setting it up and doing some playing on some scraps to figure out how to work the thing I must say I was very pleased to turn out some great joints first try!

The cam locks work great, the depth adjustments are way cool!

My only gripe is the manual SUCKS! It is way too vague for someone who has never used a dovetail jig before. I mean sure I figured it out but the manual was kinda a fill in the blanks puzzle. It took some messing around to figure out what in the world it was trying to tell me. After you get passed that it is a great item! It is really too bad that Porter Cable did not take more time with the manual and make it so dumb guys like me could figure it out a little easier!

The only other thing that is kinda a negative is the bits, I have so far not found any in my area and have not found that many online either, but I am sure as time passes they will show up.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2006
After researching several of the dovetail jigs in the $75 to $175 price range (and using them in a night school class) I decided the Porter-Cable 4212 would give me most bang for the buck. I bought one, and after just a few minutes of set-up, I was cutting pretty decent half-blind and through dovetails in scrap lumber. The jig did this right out of the box; minor tweaking on my part produced near-perfect joints. It's a well-built, solid unit.

However, I was very glad that I had some previous experience with dovetail jigs. The Porter-Cable manual is TERRIBLE! Bad explanations combined with outright wrong (and poor quality) photos would make it difficult for an inexperienced person to figure it out. The interesting thing is that P-C has recently run slick fold-out advertising in the woodworking magazines on how to make dovetailed drawers, and those explanations and photos are great. Maybe they ought to have their advertising copywriters do the manuals, too. I would have given the jig a 5-star rating if it had come with a decent manual.

I suggest that owners of the 4210/4212 jigs go to the P-C website and download the "Advanced Instruction Manual" for this jig. Although it doesn't include competitive sources, it does give the specifications for various sizes of (non P-C) router bits that can be used. The manual also contains advanced tips and techniques for neat weird things you can do with this jig.

Also, if you are doing box/finger joints, you must supply your own 1/2" straight cutting bit.

To sum it up: if you don't need a professional Akada or Leigh $500 jig, the Porter-Cable 4210/4212 is probably the best of the under $175 jigs. Plus points: It is very substantially built, easy to use, and quite accurate. Minus points: terrible manual, and somewhat odd-sized and hard to find router bits.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on July 28, 2005
this is a great jig. i have a small wood shop in belize and needed a way to make quality drawers. i had never used a dovetail jig before but this jig is a lot easier to use than most of the others sounded. after reading the directions until they were very clear i went to my shop and in about 5 minutes of set up time i made perfect half blind dovetails. this jig also makes through dovetails, box joints, and slidding dovetails. although its limited to 12" the slidding dovetails would work great for bookcases. it seems that if taken care of this jig would last for many years of use in a busy shop. thanks porter cable.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on February 24, 2006
Verified Purchase
This is a superior dovetail jig in most every way. Although it looks like it will do only simple half blind of through dovetails with a set spacing and pin/tail size it is does much much more. By going to the PC site and downloading the advance manual you will easily be able to cut variable spaced dovetails and on much much longer stock also. By making a simple mounting board removing the tail/pin jig from the unit and clamping this setup to your wider board you can dovetail cabinet or drawers deeper than the advertised 12". I just completed a blanket chest that is 26" deep and got superb dovetail using this method on all four corners. I used the variable pin/tail spacing the advance manual described and flew through the entire operation. I did use a fronter board to prevent tear out and got a very nice looking joint out of it. You can also use this method to take the jig to the router table rather than the router to the work. One very smart piece of engineering from PC.

Many of the reviewers stated you were locked into buying bits from PC only but I have found them on the net from 2 other sources plus the manual has a chart to allow you to used different size and readily available cheaper bits also. I haven't tried these different sized bits yet but will on my next project. I wand a joint that will have tiny pins/tails that will look hand cut.

The half blind set up on the drawers works much like most of the jigs out there but is easier because of the scribed locator lines and especially the BUILT IN depth stops. Very simple and easy to use.

All in all this jig is not in the same league as the Leigh but it doesn't cost $700 either. I really have no negatives to make note of on this fine accessories. Don't be afraid to buy it. You will be happy with it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 13 answered questions


Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.