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295 of 359 people found the following review helpful
on June 16, 2011
My son has autism and is allergic to gluten among other things. I was so excited to see that Rice Krispies had come out with a Gluten Free version until I read the ingredients. BHT is NOT healthy! It is an ingredient in jet fuels, rubber, petroleum products, electrical transformer oil, and embalming fluid. The MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) for BHT says the following: Do NOT let this chemical enter the environment. Combustible. Ingestion causes Abdominal pain. Confusion. Dizziness. Nausea. Vomiting. The substance may have effects on the liver. The substance is harmful to aquatic organisms. When Chex went gluten-free, they did the same thing. Yes, taking out the gluten is healthy, but adding BHT is not! I would have loved to have been able to buy my son "normal" cereal, with cute characters on the front. He would have loved it, but in the autism community, we are trying to get the toxins out of our kids, not put them in. I will continue to be a Erewhon Twice Rice Cereal customer. At over $4 per box, the price is steep, but I know the only ingredients my son is ingesting are organic brown rice, organic brown rice syrup, honey, and sea salt and he loves it. Shame on Kellogg's for putting BHT in our children's cereals!
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on August 19, 2012
I thought this was a good idea too but they flubbed up on the additives. I won't order this again and suggest trying Barbara's Organic Brown Rice Kripies as they did it right.
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27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on June 4, 2011
These taste just like the Rice Krispies I remember as a kid!! I cannot even express my joy in being able to make AND eat Rice Krispie treats with my children. It is a tradition that many take for granted, unless you can't have gluten. These Rice Krispies still provide the "snap, crackle, pop" like the original version but don't contain gluten. I think I need to start a weekly delivery via subscribe and save. They make me feel normal. :)
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on August 3, 2011
One of the main draws of this cereal was not only that it was gluten free, but also that it was made with whole grain brown rice. Whole grains both taste better and are better for you, and with the variety of whole grain products on the market today, there is no reason why anyone should settle for less. Unless, of course, you are gluten-free, and then your problems take on an entirely different nature. So it is with an eye for health and not just for Celiacs that I write this review.

First of all, as a gluten-free cereal, it does what it sets out to do: recreate the experience of regular Rice Krispies. And it does! The familiar snap, crackle, and pop are there, and though the cereal gets soggy a bit more quickly than the original, the diference is negligible. And of course, since there's no gluten, it won't make those of us who are gluten-sensitive sick.

But nutritionally, how does it compare to its gluten-laced counterpart? Well, first of all, it's heavier. The serving size is merely one cup compared to the original's 1 1/4 cups per serving. But one serving of each is still 33 grams. The gluten free version is very slightly lower in calories (120/serving as opposed to 128), but a little higher in fat (1 gram of fat and 10 calories from fat as opposed to 0.3 grams of fat and 3 calories from fat). It seems like a lot, but both are still extremely low-fat, and a serving of gluten-free rice krispies has a whopping 2% of the daily recommended amount of fat. Interestingly enough, the original has 0.1 g of saturated fat, while the gluten-free version has none at all.

The gluten-free one is lower in both sodium (190 mg vs. 299 mg) and sugar (<1 g vs. 3.1 g). It's higher in dietary fiber (1 g vs. 0.3 g) and protein (3 g vs. 2.3 g). Those last two may seem pretty insignificant, but if you're on a gluten-free diet you have to work hard to get as much fiber as you can (because most of it in a normal diet is found in whole wheat bread).

Where am I going with this? Well, it would seem that the gluten free rice krispies , though having a tiny bit more fat than the original, overall is moderately to significantly healthier. And not just for people on a gluten-free diet--vegetarians would benefit from knowing that the gluten-free version has more protein in it, and it is a good complement to the other incomplete protein in soy milk or almond milk.

On the issue of the ingredients: Traditional Rice Krispies contain rice, sugar, salt, malt flavoring, iron, Vitamin c, Vitamin E, niacinamide, Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B1, folic acid, Vitamin B12, and Vitamin D. Gluten Free Rice Krispies contains whole grain brown rice, sugar, and a tiny bit of salt and BHT. Impressive enough as it is that the gluten-free version can have fewer ingredients, supplements, and coloring agents than its original counterpart, it still contains the preservative BHT. BHT is there to increase the shelf life of your cereal and to maintain the vitamins naturally found in brown rice. However, while BHT is marketed in health food stores as a healthy supplement, some people are concerned about it causing adverse health effects. Regardless, it is approved as a food additive by the FDA, and we consume it in vastly greater quantities in many other types of food, such as soy sauce and potato chips.

Unless you are actively avoiding any and all forms of BHT or BHA (and if so, I congratulate you for your determination), I would recommend you give this cereal a try. It is tasty, healthy, and a great way to start the morning!
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28 of 36 people found the following review helpful
on January 27, 2012
I was super stoked when I saw that Kellogg's was offering gluten free Rice Krispies. I mean, it's rice so it should be gluten free, right?! Well, like communism, that's a great theory. These GF krispies could not be farther from what actual rice krispies taste like. Blerg. They taste like cardboard and turn to mush in your mouth, even when you use them to make rice krispie treats.

I think it was the choice to use brown rice. I'm not sure why they chose to do this, possibly because many people who are gluten free are also very concerned about eating "natural" foods. I'm all for balanced nutrition and whole grains, but for the love of god, I'm gluten free because I have Celiac. I've given up enough. Must I also suffer through Rice Krispies that taste like sticks?! If I wanted some hippie-dippie cereal, I would have no problem choosing one from the vast array of buckwheat twigs and no-sugar added corn knobs at Whole Foods. But I don't want that; I want Rice Krispies. I desire to drench these little pellets in melted marshmallow and margarine, so let's not kid ourselves: this is not a health food to many people, and I'm not sure why they tried to turn it into one.

In short, these get a "participant" ribbon for showing up. If they would have tried to stay closer to the original recipe without the malt flavoring, then we'd be talking about a big ol' blue 1st place award, but alas, it was not to be.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on June 27, 2011
I was thrilled to find the new gluten free Rice Krispies at Walmart for only $3.11 a box. However, I was not thrilled with the taste. The cereal does snap, crackle and pop right when you add milk and is nice and crispy. However this doesn't last long. They get a little soggy and strange tasting. I put some blackberries on top and that made it more eatable. So eat fast while it is crispy. The brown rice just doesn't do it. Why couldn't Kellog have used white rice like the original? I am new to gluten-free foods and was really looking forward to this cereal.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on February 22, 2012
I have not been gluten free for that long that I don't recall what Rice Krispies tasted like, and this GF cereal version is not a good approximation of the original. The cereal has little if any flavor. A big food company like Kellogg's should be able to come up with an acceptable barley Malt substitute that adds some of the original flavor. With GF Rice, Corn, Cinnamon, Honey Nut Chex now widely available in grocery stores, at reasonable prices, and which taste EXACTLY the same as the original versions, why would you want to choose a cereal as bland & flavorless as these GF Rice Krispies. C'Mon Kellogg's, you can do better.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on June 15, 2011
Another reviewer was upset about the price being more than regular Rice Krispies) and though this does upset me too, it became a small issue after I tasted the gf version of Rice Krispies. They taste just like the regular version and I am so excited about making GF Rice Krispie treats! They are still cheaper and taste better than any other GF rice krispie type cereal. I am not sure when or if GF Rice Krispies will be available at a store in my area-so THANK YOU for making these available to us here online!
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14 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on June 23, 2011
I was thrilled to see Kellogg's coming out with a gluten free version of Rice Krispies...that is until I saw that they were going to be made with brown rice. That is the absolute first mistake. They should have just followed suit with the way General Mills altered all of their Chex cereals and replaced the malt with molasses. I decided to give these a try just for giggles. Well I can say that I am very disappointed and I now have four boxes of Rice Krispies that are going to waste. The texture is just like all of the other brown rice cereals out there -- hard and burnt-tasting. Kellogg's, you can't be using brown rice to make Rice Krispies, it just doesn't work! I have yet to try these in Rice Krispie treats, lets hope the marshmallows and butter mask the flavor. The texture is nice for a few minutes until the milk gets to them but then its like eating paste. With the evolution of gluten free foods it is so much easier to get gluten free versions of traditional favorites to taste like the original. Gluten free consumers are no longer willing to lower their standards -- PLEASE Kellogg's, take a cue from General Mills and make this cereal gluten free without changing the recipe entirely!

Update: I tried making Rice Krispie treats. I was sure to add extra marshmallows to mask the toasted flavor. They were pretty decent I will say but I'm still disappointed that I now have 4 boxes of cereal to make Rice Krispie treats with, hopefully I can use the boxes before they expire.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on July 28, 2011
Definately not the tastiest Gluten Free cereal out there. If Kellog's is trying to compete with General Foods they have a long way to go.

I was very disappointed in the taste and consistancy of this product. And the price, like that of most GF products is crazy. And no one offers coupons for the Gluten Free products.
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