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4.6 out of 5 stars
Until the Quiet Comes
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Format: MP3 Music
It seems like every time Flying Lotus is mentioned, his connection to the family's connections to the jazz world is also brought up. On first glance, it feels like a piece of trivia - Flying Lotus is related to the Coltrane family? - but after listening to his music, it starts to make perfect sense. The brand of electronic that Flying Lotus crafts has a certain jazz-element to it, and once you hear it, you can't miss it. This connection to jazz feels stronger than ever on the LA-based producer's UNTIL THE QUIET COMES; tracks like "All the Secrets" and "See Thru to U" have a freeform fusion feel them, and at other times, the way that Flying Lotus's compositions come together (and drift apart) feel like an accomplished jazz piece.

This album isn't extremely accessible - it darts between ideas and sketches of songs, and there isn't a truly consistent through-line to guide listeners. Often, UNTIL THE QUIET COMES feels like a sketchpad where Flying Lotus was able to throw down ideas while in the studio. The producer leaves just enough room in these compositions for listeners to lose themselves in, but often these songs are over just as they find their footing. The second half of the album feels more cogent, with tracks flowing into one another, and transitions happening a bit more naturally.

There are a few guest moments on UNTIL THE QUIET COMES. Sometimes these collaborations feel inconsequential: "See Thru to U" features Erykah Badu and "Electric Candyman" features Thom Yorke, but these guest spots feel like they could have done by anyone; it doesn't feel like there's much for them to do here. The other spots (with Niki Randa and Laura Darlington) also have the same vaporous absence of personality (on part by the vocalists), but it works, because the voices become just another instrument in Flying Lotus's arsenal. The spacey weirdness Thundercat brings to "DMT Song" makes it a winner, and it often evoked memories of Mr. Bungle's work in the 90's.

UNTIL THE QUIET COMES is an interesting followup to COSMOGRAMMA - his previous album was packed with instrumentation. Here, the producer lets his songs breathe, but often at the expense of some of these tracks feeling not completely finished or though out. This album does reward repeated listens, and I would suggest that listeners give it a few samples before giving up on it. Essential tracks to sample/download: "Putty Boy Strut," "All In," and "DMT Song." There's something here for everyone, but it's up to them to explore UNTIL THE QUIET COMES.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on October 4, 2012
Format: Audio CDVerified Purchase
Not that he had much growing to do, but this CD is a step up from Cosmogramma. Hopefully you're buying it now. I listened to it via NPR's 'First Listen', then ended up listening to it another few times before writing this. People say albums are 'growers'. In this case, it isn't really that the album's growing, but that you need to be able to understand what the album's doing. It's kind of a rush of sound.
Unlike Cosmogramma, Until the Quiet Comes doesn't tend to show off. The beats are fairly minimalistic - there are multiple things going on but if you want you can pick each individual beat or groove out easily. It gives the beats air to grow in, like planting a flower and watching it bloom because there aren't any leaves blocking its light.
Until the Quiet Comes is best when you listen to it straight through. I liked Cosmogramma specifically because I would put it on and not hear most of it - I would be doing something while listening to it and would occasionally tune it out. But at the end of the CD I always felt better, somehow. I would notice it was off not by the absence of sound, but by the bad mood that came with its absence.
I smiled after this CD was finished. I'd been lulled into not analyzing certain parts - I think that's by design. The high points are very high, and the low points don't exist.
If you like electronica or whichever of the many genres FlyLo fits into, you should pick up this album. He's the only artist, at this point, whi's gotten to the point where I instantly buy his CD's.
I'd say my favorite tracks, in order of appearance on the album, are All In, Getting There, All The Secrets, Putty Boy Strut [the video is also fantastic], Hunger [the section after 2:22], me Yesterday//Corded, and Dream to Me.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 14, 2012
Format: VinylVerified Purchase
I played this whole record straight through as soon as I received it. An amazing achievement. In 2008, my girlfriend at the time, with assistance from a mini clip in an adult swim commercial, introduced me to Flying Lotus. In 2010, Cosmogramma found it's way into my bloodstream (see "Computer Face//Pure Being" to gain a full understanding). This album is exactly what previous reviews have stated; like an endless dream with a few nightmare sequences. When I die, I'd like to think the positive aspect of dying would be playing this album in the background. Euphoric measurements with room for relation to the listener. My favorite band is Radiohead and Thom Yorke on this record is a (+). There's also usage of a Jonny Greenwood guitar composition, previously released because Greenwood and Ellison never got around to collaborating during these recording sessions. In any case, it is evident that Flying Lotus continues to grow as a musician-composer-producer, for the better. **This product works well with Tangerine Kush. Enjoy!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on October 2, 2012
Format: Audio CD
FlyLo ambitiously stitches together a diverse array of musical styles on Until The Quiet Comes to produce a mesmeric lattice-work of psychedelic wonderment; with winding basslines, stuttering drum beats, bright keyboards and pitch shifted vocals featuring heavily throughout this albums duration. Although that might sound like an unpenetrable and potentially alienating concoction on paper, Mr Ellison's consumate compositional skills bring all these disparate elements together, by filtering them through his unique lens of jazzy electronica much like he did on his previous opus "Cosmogramma". "UTQC" is an all together more apporachable work than it's predecessor though, with FlyLo choosing to create a lush soundscape of mind altering mood pieces with the aforementioned elements, rather than densely packing everything together to produce something as abstract and otherwordly as "Cosmogramma". Fans of electronic music in general should find plenty on "UTQC" to drool over, but those of you who have a penchant particularly for Amon Tobin's brand of Jazz infused breakbeat and/or Matthew Herbert's soulful microhouse will be especially taken by this albums three dimensional fusion of experimental jazz and multifarious electronica.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon October 2, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Steven Ellison is US Electronic artist Flying Lotus and his new album "Until The Quiet Comes" is a woozy psychedelic affair filled with fractured rhythms and trippy synth sounds ("Heave(n)", "Tiny Tortures", "All The Secrets", "The Nightcaller" to mention a few). It sounds like inter-galactic Jazz.

He was brought up in the home of his grandmother, Marilyn McLeod, a Motown producer who penned hits like Diana Ross's "Love Hangover" and Anita Baker's "Same Ole Love", while his great-aunt was the late Alice Coltrane, wife of John Coltrane, so he does have a musical pedigree which comes through in his music.

All the 18 tracks are brief with a few guests popping up at random; Niki Randa on "Getting There" and "Hunger", Erykah Badu on the tribal "See Thru to U", Thundercat on "DMT Song", Thom Yorke on the fuzzy tempo-shifting "Electric Candyman", and Laura Darlington on "Phantasm". It must be mentioned that the vocals in most cases act as extensions to the elegiac soundscapes, never quite standing out and taking over.

Sketchy, spontaneous sounding, yet truly captivating.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2012
Format: MP3 MusicVerified Purchase
I was familiar with Flying Lotus due to word of mouth, but I hadn't really given his music enough attention to form an opinion of my own, thus my thoughts on "Until The Quiet Comes" are from a rare perspective of ignorance and this, I believe, always benefits the product, which exists as the singular portal into the Qualia of someone else, whose life and universe is a mystery yet to our own. Without awareness of the artist, his/her identity is sought through encounter with the art which, in circumstances, creates a more intimate bond with the work as opposed to its creator. In the digital age, the age of celebrity, this type of listening experience happens less and less, though when it is possible it is especially intriguing. This may be the last record Flying Lotus could make with that type of unique charm and this is due to the especially well regard this record has surrounding it and the potential successes and attention it will bestow on its mysterious creator(who may or may not be an inter-dimensional petunia smuggler), although I'm quite aware his earlier work has been exceptionally applauded as well. Commencing immediately following my initial listen of "Until the Quiet Comes" I was struck by how it had felt like a dream, or like dream language regurgitated from the psyche of a musicologist with intimate knowledge of Jazz, drug culture, cinema, R&B, futurism, nature, technology, street life, cartoons... As a dream it is difficult to grasp any one song on "Until the Quiet Comes" as a fully developed entity existing alongside equally developed separate entities, as each individual track is the embryonic symbolization of one hundred influences absorbed in experience into the subconscious of its creator, manifesting to the conscious, or listener, in dream language and disappearing before it has fully gestated into a traditional song state. It is nearly hallucinatory listening to the entirety of the album in a single sitting, as there is imagery ingrained into the shifting soundscape that refuses to adhere to an identifiable shape, merely teasing the listener as it unfurls in the red night, leading one into a psychedelic frenzy or calm, depending on the environment, as a strange narcotic could if it were as gentle as a companion; dusted, hazy light spun in drunk butterfly colors from a rickety projector directed at no point of focus and shot through with purple smoke...or...a sketch pad filled with unrealized notations of a beautiful madness that nearly attain a profoundness before breaking into an entirely new but similarly enlightened stream of consciousness so that you never get the full idea but only vague associations that result in a quite vivid listening experience man, one that may result in a long-winded critique muddled with abstract metaphors that don't quite capture the full magnitude of the feeling, but does well enough to hopefully convince any reader who has made it thus far to purchase "Until the Quiet Comes". It's a worthwhile trip.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 26, 2013
Format: Audio CDVerified Purchase
Flying Lotus or FLotus
(nobody calls him FLotus)
made a pretty dope chill album it's darkly and atmosphere while simultaneously being super relaxing and chill
the dopest of vibes light one up and fade into the sounds
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 14, 2013
Format: MP3 MusicVerified Purchase
Because it doesnt get better than flying lotus. Good beats. Lots of feeling you pick up from subliminal sounds. All Collected together in each piece so direvtly. Love it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 8, 2013
Format: MP3 MusicVerified Purchase
There are one or two tunes on here that I feel are absolutely essential, and very visionary and individually deserve 5 stars. Much of the rest is interesting, quintessential Flying Lotus, but only 4 stars overall because of the semi-fruitful nature of all the experiments. Good to help chill and derail typical musical formats and mindsets. Loaded with interesting sounds and beat structures.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 3, 2013
Format: MP3 MusicVerified Purchase
Anyone that likes FlyLo or beat music will love this. The tracks change frequently so it's not a beat tape of looped beats. This is MUSIC.
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