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Ravenous 1999 R CC


Available on Prime
(529) IMDb 7.1/10
Watch Trailer

Captain John Boyd's promotion stations him at a fort where a rescued man tells a disturbing tale of cannibalism.

Guy Pearce, Robert Carlyle
1 hour, 41 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Horror
Director Antonia Bird
Starring Guy Pearce, Robert Carlyle
Supporting actors David Arquette, Jeremy Davies, Jeffrey Jones, John Spencer, Stephen Spinella, Neal McDonough, Joseph Runningfox, Bill Brochtrup, Sheila Tousey, Fernando Becerril, Gabriel Berthier, Pedro Altamirano, Joseph Boyle, Damián Delgado, Fernando Manzano, Alfredo Escobar, Gerardo Martínez, David Heyman
Studio 20th Century Fox
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

146 of 156 people found the following review helpful By ewomack VINE VOICE on April 6, 2003
Format: DVD
This is going to sound strange, but "Ravenous" is a very intelligent movie about cannibals, vampirism (of an unusual sort) and the history of the west. At it's heart is a metaphor about power, exploitation, and ravenous greed. It is much more than simply a thriller, horror, slasher picture.
It is set during the time of westward expansion in the youthful United States, which is significant for discovering what the movie is all about. This movie wouldn't make sense in 20th century Manhattan, or in 1930s Chicago. It is set during a time when european settlers still had a long way to go towards 'conquering' most of North America.
Without giving too much away of the bizarre and twisted plot, the movie explores not only cannibalism, but cannibalism as a means of regaining life, energy, or power. You eat another, you take the life energy of that person. This notion of cannabalism (which is more along the lines of mythology than of a slasher movie) allows the movie to be completely unpredictable, disturbing and poignant all at once. At the end of the movie, one realizes that it would've been almost impossible to have guessed what was going to happen at each plot turn. If you enjoy bizarre, almost surreal surprises, this movie is packed with them.
The crucial moment in the film is towards the end when Robert Carlyle's character is rhapsodizing about "manifest destiny." Here it is revealed that what's behind the ravenous hunger depicted in the film is a statement about how the west was won, and perhaps still being won. There's a lot in this film to chew on (it's impossible to avoid stupid puns when writing about movies in which people are eaten, sorry), and "Ravenous" does not belong in the same category as B-slashers or gore or shock flicks.
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56 of 60 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 4, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Underrated, this is a hardcore, dark, macabre masterpiece. Guy Pearce (Captain John Boyd) is a soldier, who, though decorated, is actually a coward. After faking death in a battle against Mexicans, he is tossed among the dead in the enemy's encampment. He crawls out from a beneath a pile of oozing bodies and successfully takes the base from the enemy. His commander knows he isn't a real soldier and so, as he is disgusted by the sight of him but for politics sake can't reprimand him, the captain is sent to an isolated military outpost called Fort Spencer. Living there is a skeleton crew assisted by several indians and everything goes fine until a near dead man(Robert Carlyle) staggers into camp during the middle of a very cold winter. After being warmed up and fed, he tells a grisly tale of desperate cannibalism as he and the party he was traveling with got punished by the elements and were forced into a cave. A select small band soldiers and one indian set out to assist the remaining people in the cave, who by chance might just still be alive and so the movie truly begins. Nothing is quite what it seems as the twists and turns reveal the terrifying realities of the plot which eventually climax in a very satisfying and unexpected ending. The acting is excellent all around but especially with Guy Pearce and Robert Carlyle. The weak nature and mental struggles of Guy Pearce are incredibly believable and completely balance the innocent appearance yet sinister nature of Robert Carlyle. The cinematography creates a creepy, desolate atmosphere as the ingenious soundtrack(as good or better than that of Suspiria) by Damon Albarn and Michael Nyman truly fits ever scene and action, allowing for a true horror experience to be felt. With moments of twisted humor tastefully spread throughout, this is the total horror package and definitely not a movie to be should be purchased.
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45 of 50 people found the following review helpful By takethekman on October 9, 2006
Format: DVD
Bloody, funny, smart, artistic, and wonderfully acted. Robert Carlyle heads a flawless cast in a film that is so surprisingly good it puts most horror movies to shame. This is something so unique it has to be seen to be believed. There is depth here among the gallons of blood; Every character is constructed nicely, and each has their moment; The locations and snow add a nice visual layer, and the cinematography captures the drab, depressing, grim overtones nicely. Hard to beat that whole cave scene, not to mention two(yes, two...) genuine, shocking surprises in this one. But this movie is about going all out with it's premise; It's crazy and outlandish, but it runs with it...all the way. But it's also refreshing. How many countless crappy serial killer/japanese ghost kids/70's horror remakes do we have to sit through before we get something like 'Ravenous'? Way too many. I'm surprised this movie even got made. But thank God it did.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Death Kitten on September 12, 2002
Format: DVD
Someday this movie will find its audience.
A film this good cannot remain hidden forever. Although I personally want Ravenous to remain in it's obscurity. I know it can't.
I want to selfishly be the one recommending this movie to others.
I went to this film hoping above hope that it would be just good enough so I wouldn't have to walk out on it.
I spent the next ninety-minutes with a big stupid grin on my face. Ravenous rocked! And continues to rock every time I break it out of the DvD cabinet for another spin.
The soundtrack is the film's real star. Like no other I have heard before or since it will always be a close personal favorite.
The story itself has many, many turns. (And not in a Witless-Hollywood-Wild Things-way either.)
Things change. Characters develop. And people get eaten.
I so do love this movie.
(I should mention that I am neither a gore movie fanatic, nor an admirer of the "B" movie genre.)
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