The Rains Of Ranchipur 1955 NR CC

(22) IMDb 5.9/10
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Under the invitation of the Maharani, a British couple travel to India, where the bored housewife proceeds to fall into a torrid affair complicated by a series of disasters by Mother Nature.

Starring:
Lana Turner, Richard Burton
Runtime:
1 hour, 44 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Adventure
Director Jean Negulesco
Starring Lana Turner, Richard Burton
Supporting actors Fred MacMurray, Joan Caulfield, Michael Rennie, Eugenie Leontovich, Gladys Hurlbut, Madge Kennedy, Carlo Rizzo, Beatrice Kraft, Rama Bai, John Banner, Jugat Bhatia, George Brand, Argentina Brunetti, King Calder, Paul Frees, Naji Gabbay, Ivis Goulding, Bhupesh Guha
Studio 20th Century Fox
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Morbius on November 14, 2012
Format: Blu-ray
Jean Negulesco was actually a pretty good director when it came to this type of film....throw in Richard Burton and Lana Turner and some excessive H2O in Cinemascope and you have a pretty good drama.... the Twilight Time blu-ray is excellent as usual, and this one (Bonjour Tristesse also) has subtitles for those who may need them....great color 1950's film for the buffs amongst us....
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Format: Blu-ray
From the time when Fox, as with Avatar's 3D, were looking for big subjects for their new format (in this case CinemaScope, the miracle you see without glasses!), The Rains of Ranchipur manages to improve somewhat on the studio's disappointing 1939 version The Rains Came. The plot has been streamlined and updated to post-colonial India, the number of characters reduced and the earthquake and floods been moved from the middle of the picture to its grand finale, while this time around the film doesn't dodge the issue of the interracial romance between Richard Burton's Indian doctor and Lana Turner's bored American socialite (for some strange reason doing what seems like a Marilyn Monroe impersonation) the way it oh so coyly did when Tyrone Power and Myrna Loy played the parts even if it doesn't go so far as to actually cast an Indian actor. The results are generally more satisfying even if the film is ultimately nothing more than lavishly mounted romantic hokum of forbidden love, bad weather and Welsh Indians, though Ray Kellog's Oscar-nominated special effects are disappointing compared to the original - the physical effects and model shots are impressive enough, but there's some very poor optical work with all too visible lines and elements that clearly don't match. It doesn't help that Fred McMurray's big redemptive act of heroism happens offscreen either. It's not terribly profound stuff, but any film with dialogue like "The destruction of midgets does not interest me" isn't without merit.

While Fox's Spanish PAL DVD boasts a good 2.55:1 widescreen transfer but no extras, Twilight Time's limited edition Blu-ray includes three trailers, a TV spot ("It's raining stars in Ranchipur!"), isolated track for Hugo Friedhofer's excellent score and booklet as well as superior picture quality and is definitely the way to go.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Chuck Snow on June 2, 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This is one piece of 50's CinemaScope hokum that you either love or you hate. It is a re-make of the 30's "The Rains Came" with Tyrone Power and Myrna Loy.

The 1955 version adds color and wide screen. The locales take place in "exotic" India and deals with a bunch of misplaced colonials including a visiting heiress (Lana Turner), her titled husband (Michael Rennie), a washed-up writer (Fred McMurray), a rebellious young woman (Joan Caulfield), a charming but unyielding Maharani (Eugenie Leontovich) and a naive Indian doctor (Richard Burton). As you can see, by today's politically correct standards, a throughroughly miscast movie - some are racially wrong, while a few are a tad too "mature" for the parts being played. But since we're dealing with a very slick and expensive potboiler and this was the 50's, you have to take it or leave it.

The plot gets going right away with the arrival in Ranchipur of a titled couple (Turner & Rennie) who have come to buy horses from the local Maharani's stables. The wife falls in love with a young Indian doctor (Burton) thus incurring in the Maharani's displeasure (Leontovich) since she is the young man's sponsor and has big plans for his future. Another story concerns an alcoholic ex-writer (McMurray) who gets involved with a rebellious young student (Caulfield). This all takes place amidst much dialogue, smoking and cocktails, lush locales, a tiger hunt that almost turns deadly, a mammoth flood, malaria fever, and one of the most spectacular, jaw-dropping Hollywood made earthquakes this side of "Green Dolphin Street." It is all the kind of effective hokum Hollywood used to craft so expertly, and the FX are quite impressive considering they did not have access to CGI in those days.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By usrunnr on October 5, 2011
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Oh, this is a lot of fun. An old fashioned, big star movie, a melodrama in Old India or thereabouts, somewhere around Hollywood anyway. Nice color, big stars, a dam break, an earthquake, an illicit romance, a few old fashioned special effects, and no CGI. If only it were available on DVD. Your family will enjoy it.
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Format: DVD
From the time when Fox, as with Avatar's 3D, were looking for big subjects for their new format (in this case CinemaScope, the miracle you see without glasses!), The Rains of Ranchipur manages to improve somewhat on the studio's disappointing 1939 version The Rains Came. The plot has been streamlined and updated to post-colonial India, the number of characters reduced and the earthquake and floods been moved from the middle of the picture to its grand finale, while this time around the film doesn't dodge the issue of the interracial romance between Richard Burton's Indian doctor and Lana Turner's bored American socialite (for some strange reason doing what seems like a Marilyn Monroe impersonation) the way it oh so coyly did when Tyrone Power and Myrna Loy played the parts even if it doesn't go so far as to actually cast an Indian actor. The results are generally more satisfying even if the film is ultimately nothing more than lavishly mounted romantic hokum of forbidden love, bad weather and Welsh Indians, though Ray Kellog's Oscar-nominated special effects are disappointing compared to the original - the physical effects and model shots are impressive enough, but there's some very poor optical work with all too visible lines and elements that clearly don't match. It doesn't help that Fred McMurray's big redemptive act of heroism happens offscreen either. It's not terribly profound stuff, but any film with dialogue like "The destruction of midgets does not interest me" isn't without merit.

Fox's Spanish PAL DVD boasts a good 2.55:1 widescreen transfer but no extras, though Twilight Time's limited edition Blu-ray includes three trailers, a TV spot ("It's raining stars in Ranchipur!"), isolated track for Hugo Friedhofer's excellent score and booklet as well as superior picture quality and is definitely the way to go.
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