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Glengarry Glen Ross 1992 R CC

A riveting tale of desperation and betrayal based on David Mamet's Pulitzer Prize-winning play. Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin, Ed Harris, and Kevin Spacey shine in this powerful story set in the world of real estate.

Starring:
Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon
Runtime:
1 hour, 40 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director James Foley
Starring Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon
Supporting actors Alec Baldwin, Alan Arkin, Ed Harris, Kevin Spacey, Jonathan Pryce, Bruce Altman, Jude Ciccolella, Paul Butler, Lori Tan Chinn, Neal Jones, Barry Rohrssen, Leigh French, George Cheung, Murphy Dunne, Dana Lee, Julie Payne, Gregory Snegoff, Skipp Lynch
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on November 14, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
This is perhaps the most well written movie of our time.If you are looking for explosions and car chases,please move on.The dialogue(David Mamet)is scintillating,the interaction of the characters is intriguing.The editing is quick,the cinemetography superb.The cast is phenomanal.Al Pacino(Ricky Roma):the quintessential swarthy,bottom feeding salesman...Jack Lemmon(Shelly Levine):The has been,looking for any angle to snap out of his sales malaise;the pathos conveyed by Lemmon is gutwrenching...Ed Harris(Dave Moss):The scheming,conniving loser;he will go to any lengths to move ahead...Alan Arkin(George Aranov)The mousy under achiever;easily swayed.His understated lack of direction is carried off with deft subtlety by Arkin.Kevin Spacey(John Williamson)The clueless office manager,and whipping boy.Spacey manages to give this role a sinister undercurrent.He ends up as quite the paradox...Alec Baldwin turns up for ten of the most memorable minutes ever filmed.This role is the highlight of his underwhelming career.Arrogance oozes from his every word;contempt permeates his every sentence.Expertly directed by James Foley,this is 36 hrs.in the lives of men desperate;on the edge.The world of real estate sales will never be the same after you see this classic.An extremely cerebral flick,not meant for those with short attention spans.A gauranteed can't miss movie experience.
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Format: DVD
Welcome to the world of real estate, where the golden rule always is "A.B.C." Always Be Closing. This means, lie, cheat, steal, whatever. As long as you get a signature on the dotted line, nothing else matters. And times aren't the greatest for the salesmen at Premiere Properties. None of them are getting the good leads that they need in order to close. And if they don't start closing soon, they're going to find themselves out of the job. There are the "Glengarry" leads, but they're reserved for closers only. And this heated-up and emotional drama gets even more deeper when it turns out that the next day the office was broken into and the Glengarry leads were stolen. In a business where lying, cheating, and stealing all are in a day's work, everyone is suspect.
I cannot believe I had never heard of "Glengarry Glen Ross" until recently. As soon as I popped the DVD in, I fell in love with it immediately. It is so well written and well acted that you can't do nothing but watch in awe. And then, you want to watch it again and again. I have just purchased this movie a couple of weeks ago, and I know my viewings of the film are already in the double digits. This is a movie you can really watch whenever you want. You don't need to be in a certain mood to enjoy it.
The cast is sensational. You've got Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Ed Harris, Alan Arkin, Kevin Spacey, and Alec Baldwin. Pacino is great as always and really steals the show during the second act of the film. Your eyes never leave him for a second. Jack Lemmon was also so terrific in it, and it's heartbreaking that he didn't win an Oscar. Everybody else did great in their roles as well.
What I liked about this movie most was the realistic dialogue.
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Format: DVD
The other day I was discussing salespeople with a friend and we determined that nobody likes being sold anything. Coincidental, then, that I saw Glengarry Glen Ross that night, as the film seems to support our hypothesis, but it adds another dimension to it: the salespeople themselves may not necessarily even like selling anything. In fact, the men in this movie are selling for survival; if they don't sell, they don't eat.

Near the beginning of the film, a man from the downtown office (Alec Baldwin) offers encouragement to three salesmen who aren't meeting their quotas by way of verbal abuse. First prize is a brand new Cadillac, second prize is a set of steak knives, and third prize is the door: you're fired. The men are selling real estate, using the weak leads handed down to them from above. There is Shelley Levene (Jack Lemmon), nicknamed The Machine for his past sales record, who has hit a wall in his career and can't seem to close any more sales. He desperately needs to keep his job to pay medical bills for his wife. Dave Moss (Ed Harris) is fed up with all of the bureaucracy, and doesn't feel people should be treated this way--and they shouldn't. George Aaronow (Alan Arkin) isn't the sharpest tool in the drawer, and tends to be swayed by his colleagues.

All three of these men are jealous of the only guy making any sales lately, Ricky Roma (Al Pacino). Dave is convinced that the rest of them would be doing just as well if they were getting the good leads that he is, but according to their by-the-book company-pleasing manager John Williamson (Kevin Spacey), only closers are worthy of the good leads--the Glengarry leads.
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Format: DVD
I have been waiting for Glengarry Glen Ross since I first purchased my DVD player several years ago. This film is easily in my all time top 10. When I heard it was going to be a 2 disc special edition, I figured it would be worth the wait. I managed to get my hands on a copy early and to be honest it is a let down. The widescreen transfer is beautiful but this has to be one of the most empty 2-disc SE's around. The most disappointing missing feature is the commentary that Jack Lemmon did for the SE laserdisc. What better way to preserve his legacy than to include his comments about arguably his finest film performance? Instead, you get a Jack Lemmon "tribute" feature with interviews from his son, Peter Gallagher, and other folks who are mildly ammusing. Another feature is "New Cast Interviews" which is simply Alan Arkin and Alec Baldwin (separately) doing commentary over scenes from the movie. No Pacino, no Ed Harris, no Spacey. They have included a nice Charlie Rose show clip with Lemmon and a very short Spacey clip from "Inside the Actor's Studio". Then you get a non-Glengarry related feature on salesman. Why? You do get a new commentary from the director which is nice, but this was an actor's movie first and foremost. Why Artisan took several years to finally release this on DVD is quite frankly hard to understand with what has been delivered. Mitch and Murray would be very upset with Aristan's effort here. Long live the Machine!
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