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Bin Yah: There's No PLace Like Home 2009 NR

(3)

Bin Yah: [Gullah] n. sing. 1. "been here": natives, long-time residents "Bin Yah: There's No Place Like Home" is a critically acclaimed documentary feature presented by American Independent Filmmaker Justin Nathanson.

Runtime:
57 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Justin Nathanson
Studio the cut company, llc
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Teri Thomas on January 30, 2011
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This is a very interesting documentary but there are things it didn't cover. It claims the Gullah Geechee are from West Africa but yet it didn't say which country which leads one to ask why? If the people can remember they're from Africa they can remember the whereabouts in Africa. The real Muskogee Indians (not the "native Americans but the Aboriginals) of North America claim these people are of their bloodline. To be aboriginal mean your people always existed on the landmass you currently reside, can't be aboriginal if you came from some place else.

Also there are some Gullahs who are saying the Gullah Geechees are a branch of the Muskogee. They go further to say Queen Quet is not one of them biologically she just appeared on the scene speaking on their behalf without their consent. They mentioned something about a land grab to build a large expensive resort on the coast but couldn't until the people relinquished their ancestral rights to that land, in walks Queen Quet. In other words she's cosigning these "American Aboriginals" to a historical lie that's causing them to lose their ancestral lands in the Carolinas and Georgia by saying they're Africans by origin when they're not. So is the documentary truthful or are the Gullah Geechee being mislead? Hmm what a conundrum !!!!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan R. Lamb on January 3, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I learned a lot about the historical African-American communities in Mount Pleasant. I've seen them on maps and occasionally mentioned but didn't realize their historical significance. Pretty remarkable that these families have lived on the same lands for so many generations. Such a shame that people with green in their eyes can so easily pave over all of this history.
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By JFN south on February 11, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
for any one interested in Southern history, this documentary explores contemporary issues of the Gullah in rhe lowcountry and why things are the way they are. Very well done
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