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Make Believe 2011 NR CC

4.9 out of 5 stars (25) IMDb 7.1/10

MAKE BELIEVE follows six teens who all share an extraordinary passion - the art of magic. Armed with great skill and a dazzling array of illusions, they embark from around the world to attend the World Magic Seminar in Las Vegas.

Starring:
Ed Alonzo, Albert M. Belmont Jr.
Runtime:
1 hour, 32 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director J. Clay Tweel
Starring Ed Alonzo, Albert M. Belmont Jr.
Supporting actors Gay Blackstone, Eugene Burger, Lance Burton, Joan Caesar, Joe Diamond, Bob Dorian, Kyle Eschen, Siphiwe Fangase, Eric Giliam, Andrew Goldenhersh, William Goodwin, David Gore, Hideo Hara, Hiroki Hara, Mio Hara, Neil Patrick Harris, Mark Kelly, Steve Kline
Studio Make Believe, LLC
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
it's rare to find a documentary in which pretty much every single character seems an underdog. so thank goodness tweel made a film about teen magicians. now granted, his underdogs run the gamut, from oddly snotty to hopelessly lonely to totally wicked awesome. but they all personify, in a myriad of different ways, the awkward high school experience common to all of us, everywhere, globally. the competition maintains the pace, and the magic itself is often quite spectacular. but the real magic is mined in meeting social loners who find a perfect, cozy little niche - on stage.
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By Timegoesby on October 23, 2012
Format: DVD
I envy these kids. Not because they can perform magic, but because each one has found a skill which they want to develop and feel a passion and commitment for. I don't think a person would have the energy and drive to keep perfecting their magic skills unless they really felt something for it. I thought the Japanese teen was the most amazing - he taught himself how to perform magic with very little resources compared to the other teen. I liked how he incorporated nature into his magic, and practiced for hours. What talent!
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Format: DVD
When I had the opportunity to watch "Make Believe," I knew very little about the documentary. Having lived in Los Angeles for ten years, I always wanted to explore the infamous Magic Castle in Hollywood--but alas, I was just a mere mortal and not one of the privileged. This film, though, is about making those kind of dreams come true. And for that reason, it is pretty irresistible. If you have watched other documentaries about a particular competition (spelling, cooking, racing, etc), you will be absolutely familiar with the framework of this movie. We span the globe and are introduced to six aspiring young magicians. They then are chosen to compete in a Teen World Championship, visit the Magic Castle, journey to Las Vegas and we see much of the competition before a winner is declared. Luckily, the subjects are appealing and interesting and it's absolutely fascinating to see the dedication that each has put into perfecting the skill of illusion. In the end, maybe the film itself would qualify for four stars--but I absolutely loved it and got swept up into this world. For that reason, I've got to tell you to see this movie especially if you love magic! It's a no-brainer and my heart awards "Make Believe" the highest recommendation.

Why? It's the kids. They are a diverse group and you find yourself rooting for each one for varying reasons. All the kids contribute greatly to the documentary, but these are the ones that really stood out for me. There's the incumbent star, Krysten Lambert, a Malibu blonde raised in this environment and considered a huge talent already. Derek McGee, from Colorado, used his love of magic to escape a life of severe shyness (a truly appealing underdog).
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Format: DVD
"Make Believe" is a surprisingly entertaining documentary covering the quest of young magicians competing to become the Teen World Champion at the World Magic Seminar in Las Vegas. This is a look at some of the most talented of the contestants before, during, and after the competition. There is a subculture for almost everything and this documentary shows that the magician culture is very much alive and active.

I enjoyed seeing how the kids balanced their daily lives with the demands of preparing for the competition. These are very dedicated and determined performers that literally spend hours a day practicing and refining their acts. The filmmakers did a great job capturing the emotions and sense of anticipation in the days leading up to the event.

It is easy to forget how young these magicians are when you see the first rate magic they perform. It is also easy to forget that they are competing for a title that will help propel their magic careers and land them on TV specials if they win. Which leads to the only part of the documentary that I found somewhat distasteful, it involves an older woman "has-been" that encourages a girl contestant to flaunt her body and uses a crude term that has no place in what would have otherwise been a kid friendly family video.

The "Extra Features" include a deeper look at the young contestants lives and a collection of instructional magic tricks, ranging from simple to amazingly difficult, that you can learn by watching the video.

This was an entertaining and informative look into a world I didn't even know existed.
Recommended!

CFH

Note: Review copy provided by manufacturer
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Format: DVD
Obsessions in youngsters aren't necessarily bad as MAKE BELIEVE proves. On the surface this is a film about a competition for magicians of a young age and as such it explores the fascination and need and the other painful aspects of adolescence that center on being noticed, accepted and to feel OK about themselves. That is what make this films work and why it has become an inspiration for so many young people who are trying to follow their dream - a trait too many of their subsequent generation have forsaken or found inappropriate in the dog eat dog world of making a living.

Along the say in this beautifully paced docudrama we meet six contestants who will vie for the title of Teen World Champion in the World Magic Seminar in Las Vegas. Each of these contestants captures our hearts and through their penetrating focus on preparing for the competition and the notice from the public, from their families and from each other weaves a story that revisits what it is like to dream - in the vulnerable time of adolescence. This is not a peek into American teens' lives - this is a journey around the globe where we meet teens form many countries, and the disparities and similarities among these youngsters who are likely inclined in the same field is a lesson in sociology and psychology and coming of age. It has moments of sadness, moments of anxiety and moments of humor all blended into a surprisingly entertaining and heartwarming film. Grady Harp, December 12
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