The Living Daylights 1987 PG CC

(391) IMDb 6.7/10

Timothy Dalton's first outing as Bond sees him run into a covert Russian operation involving international drugs and arms deals.

Starring:
Timothy Dalton, Maryam d'Abo
Runtime:
2 hours, 11 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Romance, Adventure, Action
Director John Glen
Starring Timothy Dalton, Maryam d'Abo
Supporting actors Jeroen Krabbé, Joe Don Baker, John Rhys-Davies, Art Malik, Andreas Wisniewski, Thomas Wheatley, Desmond Llewelyn, Robert Brown, Geoffrey Keen, Walter Gotell, Caroline Bliss, John Terry, Virginia Hey, John Bowe, Julie T. Wallace, Belle Avery, Catherine Rabett, Dulice Liecier
Studio MGM
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

73 of 73 people found the following review helpful By gobirds2 TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 3, 2007
Format: DVD
The first thing that struck me about this film is that Timothy Dalton could act and he took the part very seriously. I found THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS to be one of the better James Bond films. I think it is the best since ON HER MAJESTY's SECRET SERVICE. I really liked Timothy Dalton as James Bond, the James Bond he gave us in this film (THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS). He was not the hard edged civil servant but more of a thinking man's blunt instrument as he demonstrated his reluctance to get the job done "their" way as opposed to "his" way.

John Barry delivered his last 007 score and it is one of his best. I also enjoyed a-ha's rich and lyrical theme song played over Maurice Binder's main titles, which are very reflective. This was also the last Bond film made during the actual cold war. We see a much more intelligent British agent discern that the KGB is not made up of a bunch of hoodlums but instead it is actually headed by an equally intelligent counterpart to "M" and the like. The dark yet richly colored photography and locations bring back much of the feel of the earlier Bond films.

Timothy Dalton deserved to be around much longer as James Bond based on his work in this film.
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39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By "jokko" on August 12, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
First of all, this is about 10 times better than Timothy Dalton's second flick as 007, Licence to Kill, which was a good movie, but didn't quite make it into my list of fantastic Bonds. The Living Daylights is a charming, romantic, fast-paced adventure, which, in my opinion can hold a candle to movies as historic as Goldfinger and From Russia With Love. Dalton is on top of his career as Bond, and proves right away that he needed no time to adapt to the character as Moore did (3 movies in fact).This film starts off with a bang as an unknown madman, part of an international conspiracy called "smiert spionem" (kill spies), ruins a routine MI6 training session as he kills off several 00 agents, until getting outrun by 007. The movie itself is centered around an important KGB defector who doublecrosses the secret service after promising loyalty, and hooks up with a dirty dealing American arms dealer named Brad Whitaker (played by Joe Don Baker), who wants to help the KGB defector finance his "smiert spionem" conspiracy. Along with a ruthless KGB henchman named Necros, Georgi Koskov (the KGB defector, played by Jeroen Krabbe) fights time and 007 to carry out his whimsical plans. The movie is equipped with fantastic action sequences such as a chase down an Austrian ski slope in a cello case, a fantastic mid-air brawl with Necros and Koskov, and a climatic thriller in Whitaker's villa, where the insane arms dealer tries to fry Bond in his battle room.
This is a fantastic movie not only because it has a great plot, great actors, and a great bond, but because it also has a bond girl who bond seems really attracted to.
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51 of 57 people found the following review helpful By A. Casalino VINE VOICE on June 7, 2004
Format: DVD
The taglines for this, the 15th Bond entry, promised- "The most dangerous Bond ever," and right there beyond the flippant fun that Roger Moore had brought, THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS came and made good on that vow. In a cool, totally decked-out Aston Martin, our favorite spy propels himself into this, the last of the series' Cold War intrigues (furthermore being the final title penned by its creator, Ian Fleming). And herein, the flavour of Fleming is found everywhere-
Having been a child of 007's Roger Moore era, I had- on some seven different occasions during the course of his 14-year reign as Bond- looked forward with great anticipation to the very heights of fun and adventure. Moore, with his infectious charm and cheeky wit, was absolutely and completely entertaining as Bond. So I was naturally a little edgy when, in 1987, he retired, to pass the torch to another actor.
I was in college, studying English literature when I heard Timothy Dalton would be the next James Bond. To me, this seemed an exceedingly interesting choice- for here was a classically trained Welsh actor, who at that time had been fairly unknown. Yet I already knew him, of course: not only had he made his impression in some of the Shakespeare plays I'd been studying, but this ardent, sensitive actor had actually won my heart with his perfect portrayals of two beloved Bronte heroes- (Charlotte's "Rochester" and Emily's "Heathcliff.") Needless to say, I just couldn't wait for this one~~
THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS is a spy thriller in every classical sense.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 8, 2000
Format: DVD
The Living Daylights is the first Bond movie(out of only two)with Timothy Dalton.He looks a little uneasy at times,but for the most part,did very well,and plays the part a lot more seriously than Roger Moore did.As for the movie itself,it's very good,and a lot better than Moore's last 007 film,A View to a Kill.There is plenty of action and gadgets,including a really cool Aston Martin car.Maryam d'Abo is good as very pretty Bond girl Kara Milovny.Joe Don Baker as Brad Whitaker and Jeroen Krabbe' as General Koskov are the main villains,they both do a pretty good job,but aren't that memorable as far as Bond villains go.The John Barry musical score(the last one he's done in the Bond series to date) and title song by Ah-Ha are both very good.Overall,it's a good Bond film,and nice debut for Dalton,who really came into his own as Bond in the next film,License to Kill,which is excellent.Great DVD with a sharp picture,good sound,and lots of extras.
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