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I Do 2013 NR CC

4.2 out of 5 stars (92) IMDb 6.5/10

A gay Brit in New York loses his immigration status and risks losing his family and life in the U.S. so he marries his lesbian best friend to remain in the country.

Starring:
Jamie-Lynn Sigler, Alicia Witt
Runtime:
1 hour, 31 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director Glenn Gaylord
Starring Jamie-Lynn Sigler, Alicia Witt
Supporting actors Maurice Compte, David W Ross, Grant Bowler
Studio Gravitas
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Amazon Video
It is refreshing to discover a little film that deals with important issues and respects those issues to the point of avoiding cliché and parody. I DO was written, produced and stars the very talented (and handsome and hunky) David W. Ross who has composed a story that deals with the now newsworthy attention on Proposition 8, the Defense Of Marriage Act (DOMA), immigration issues, and the spectrum of the gay community, and from these poignant issues he delivers a touching, humorous, tart, and ultimately deeply moving film.

Jack Edwards (David W. Ross) was born in England but came to America to study Photography and is successful in his art but lacks a significant other: we get the message that he has transient affairs with men who disappoint him. We meet Jack in a restaurant where he is joining his brother Peter (Grant Bowler) and his wife Mya (Alicia Witt) to hear that Mya is expecting. The happy trio leaves the restaurant and in hailing a cab, Jack drops his wallet and when Peter attempts to find it Peter is killed by an oncoming car. Devastated, Jack assumes Peter's role with Mya and when her daughter Tara (Jessica Tyler Brown) is born, Uncle Jack helps Mya raise her (Mya is in Nursing School and needs supportive assistance). The relationship is warm and each of the three enjoys each other's presence - young Tara is utterly accepting of Uncle Jack's being gay - a fine lesson for all adults...

Jack is notified that his Visa is expiring and he must return to England unless he can find a way to attain a Green Card. A very fine councilor, Gloria (Patricia Belcher) is strict and warns Jack that unless he finds a way to stay he will be deported.
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Format: DVD
Jack is `an Englishman in New York' and like the subject of that song, Quentin Crisp, he too is gay. He has a straight brother and a few other connections, then after his brother has broken the news that he is to be a father he is run down and killed. The story moves on a number of years and Jack (David W. Ross who was in nineties boy band `The Backstreet Boys') has become the dutiful uncle to little Tara and a support to his sister in law, who clearly still misses her husband.

Then Jack is told that immigration control is onto him (and they are not nice people) and he will be deported as his work visa is going to run out. His only hope it seems is to get married for the elusive `Green Card' and to do that means finding a pliable woman and actually knowing each other well enough to convince the authorities that they are not faking it. He does not want to leave his family, having no more connections in England and then he meets interior architect Mano who is Spanish and has a bit of emotional baggage but is a nice man and they soon fall for each other. The problems that they then face will test the mettle of everyone involved and simmering resentments, unsaid feelings and emotional extremes all come pouring out.

This is a really powerful film. I thought it was a drama and a half as so much happens that it would be enough to turn most people to prescription medication or booze or both. The characters are all believable and the acting is superb, I particularly liked Sam who plays `the stately homo' as Mr Crisp once called himself. His `besty' Alison is also great and plays the role of friend, confidant and betrayer all perfectly. The whole thing had me wanting to know more and I could not help being concerned for all of the characters which is a ruddy good achievement. I had no expectations of this at all but was left feeling I had seen something of rare quality, very moving and a rewarding watch too which I can thoroughly recommend.
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Format: DVD
When Jack’s brother dies in a freak accident, Jack steps up – big time – to devote much of his life to help his sister-in-law raise their daughter there in New York City. About eight years later, trouble surfaces, when Jack – a citizen of the UK here on a student visa – is turned down for a green card, and faces deportation. While Jack is gay, he enlists the help of a lesbian co-worker to marry him, but she later panics when I.C.E. challenges their living situation. In the interim, Jack has met Mano, and is in love. Although Mano is a US citizen, and willing to marry Jack, this story took place when only the state would recognize a same-sex marriage, and, thus, it would not do him any good for federal immigration issues.

It’s ironic and unfortunate that this 2012 film was released on DVD more than two months after the court decision on DOMA essentially made much of the plot obsolete. It still delivers a powerful message about love and relationships, delivered by a diverse, talented cast with good direction. David W. Ross, who plays Jack, also wrote the screenplay, and the film has won awards at several film festivals. Unrated, likely would not be anything other than a PG-13. DVD includes extensive extras, including a music video, deleted scenes, cast Q&A, and film festival coverage. Great choice to show to someone who still doesn’t “get the point” about why same-sex marriage is needed. Five stars out of five.
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Format: DVD
Anyone who's hungry for a feel-good, studio-quality gay romance - with crisp photography, classy sets, clear sound, attractive actors with celebrity stubble, hot bods, pure hearts, and plenty of obstacles for true love to overcome - is going to love this movie. There are no others like it. Even lesbians are pretty well represented, within the movie's Hollywood-like straight-acting constraints. It's certainly as good and as believable as any straight romance Hollywood ever made. Even straight people might like it, because there's a very cute child, the gays are wonderfully domestic and straight-acting, and true love is true love regardless of gender.

The fact that this movie's objective - equal treatment of gay married couples under US immigration law - had, to the whole world's amazement, already been achieved by the time the DVD was released doesn't compromise its effectiveness as much as it could have. It really is a very romantic drama much more than an appeal for justice, so while the appeal already sounds dated it's a small enough part of the movie that it's easy to overlook.

For gay men like me, though, and others who aren't particularly romantic, this movie is not so great. The problem is the screenplay, written by David W. Ross, who also stars as Jack.

Nearly every point on which the highly melodramatic story turns is weak at best, and often ludicrous: Drag-racing taxis on a rainy Manhattan street at night? Jack suddenly losing his work visa after 20 steadily productive years in the US? Why? His lawyer says it's "because of 9/11"? Was every gainfully-employed British WASP deported ten years after 9/11? It makes no sense.

And after all those years of obviously successful employment (just look at his fabulous Manhattan loft apartment!
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