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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The product itself is solid, the issue is more with taking BP at the wrist
From Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. via the Mayo Clinic website as retrieved 12/31/13, in response to; "How accurate are wrist blood pressure monitors?"

"Wrist blood pressure monitors are extremely sensitive to body position. To get an accurate reading when taking your blood pressure with a wrist monitor, your arm and wrist must be at heart level. Even...
Published 11 months ago by W. C. Bryant

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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tracks BP but Only on the Proprietary App
Wrist blood pressure units are a lot easier to use if you measure your own blood pressure,which every body with high BP should. With the wrist unit, the technique of measurement is very crucial: the monitor should be at the level of the heart and cuff should be half an inch above the wrist. As the studies by Consumer Reports, and Mount Sinai Medical School have shown,...
Published 12 months ago by SanjeevP


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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The product itself is solid, the issue is more with taking BP at the wrist, December 31, 2013
By 
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
From Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. via the Mayo Clinic website as retrieved 12/31/13, in response to; "How accurate are wrist blood pressure monitors?"

"Wrist blood pressure monitors are extremely sensitive to body position. To get an accurate reading when taking your blood pressure with a wrist monitor, your arm and wrist must be at heart level. Even then, blood pressure measurements taken at the wrist are usually higher and less accurate than those taken at your arm. That's because the wrist arteries are narrower and not as deep under your skin as those of the forearm."

The BP7, not by nature of a flaw in its design, suffers from the above. Most people are going to experience higher results on a wrist monitor than they are one that goes around the upper arm. So if we understand that, and set it aside in favor of the increased convenience of a monitor for the wrist, then what we're left with is an attractive and well designed instrument that also offers an intuitive iOS application that allows you to track history.

The rub, of course, being that you can hardly view the results as anything more than high-representative of where your BP may be, but then few seek medical-grade precision with home instruments. What this can do, and does well, is provide consistent results. Which is to say that once you have an idea of how high it runs for you (and heed well Dr. Sheps's *and* the manufacturer's clear notes about the all important angle -- the app won't even start until it's right enough), then you can make reasonable assumptions going forward about what variations to those readings mean in terms of your current levels. A high baseline can still be informative insofar as maintaining the same, or coming in perceptibly higher or lower than normal, gives you a general idea of where you stand.

I think it would be easy to rate this product lower based on high results, but after doing some digging and trying another form of wrist reading, my own experience has been that iHealth has produced a quality and affordable wireless monitor here; hence the rating. Would have liked an on-device display and control option, even a small one, for times you don't have or don't want to use the phone, but that's a pretty minor note as it would likely mean a more expensive device. Pleased, noting the caveats as above.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tracks BP but Only on the Proprietary App, December 14, 2013
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Wrist blood pressure units are a lot easier to use if you measure your own blood pressure,which every body with high BP should. With the wrist unit, the technique of measurement is very crucial: the monitor should be at the level of the heart and cuff should be half an inch above the wrist. As the studies by Consumer Reports, and Mount Sinai Medical School have shown, with the proper technique, the readings from wrist blood pressure units are accurate and comparable to upper arm cuff units. For last two or three years, I have used Omron 7 Series Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor daily and it has given fairly accurate readings. The reason it is so accurate is that you do not have to guess about the right position to measure BP; it emits blue light and starts measuring BP when it is at the right level.

Blood pressure readings, and for that matter all other health readings like weight, pulse, activity level etc. are most useful when they are tracked and you can visualize the progress or change over time and see the impact of interventions, like taking a blood pressure medicine. And it is lot easier, if you can monitor all those measurements in the same app on your mobile device and same website on the Internet.

However, as of now, there are a variety of tracking measurement devices for blood pressure, weight, activity, and they all have their own apps and websites. Not all of them send the information to a unifying app like Microsoft HealthVault or Argus. Some companies like iHealth, Withings, FitBit are beginning to make multiple tracking devices, but still track it on their proprietary apps and web sites.

And this Bluetooth blood pressure unit from iHealth also attempts to do that. iHealth Makes a variety of wireless measurement devices like the wrist blood pressure unit, weighing scale, and activity tracker which transmit the information to their app and the website. But to be able to track all those measurements on one app, you have to buy all the iHealth devices.

According to the instructions that come with this unit, after putting it on your wrist, you bring it to the level of "right atrium" and you can rest your arm on the traveling case, that they provide, to bring the unit to the level of "right atrium". Now most people know where the level of their heart is, but how many know that the right atrium is? May be that is the explanation of inaccurate readings being reported by other reviewers.

What I found is that as long as you keep this iHealth wrist blood pressure monitor on the level of the heart, while measuring the blood pressure, the BP readings are very comparable to Omron series 7 blood pressure unit, at the most, the variance is 5 to 10 mm. The unit is very attractively packaged, looks good, and easy to put on the wrist.

PROBLEMS THAT THIS UNIT
1. Instructions are poorly written, for example "right atrium" instead of saying the level of the heart.
2. You have to have the iPhone app on while measuring the blood pressure. Not only that, unless you turn auto connect on, you have to connect the app to this wrist blood pressure unit every time.
3. You cannot measure the blood pressure without the app unless you first turn on the off-line mode in the settings of the app.
4. This wrist blood pressure unit works only with their proprietary iHealth app and none of the other health measurement tracking apps like HealthVault, Argus etc
5. iHealth app is Only for iOS devices, not for android.
6. Can be charged only through USB port.

So if you are looking for a just wrist blood pressure unit, then I would recommend Omron 7 Series Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor, which is very accurate (even confirmed by Consumer Reports). But if tracking and wireless connectivity is important to you, then I would wait for some more time, before all these wireless measurement devices can get their act together and transmit their data to a single tracking app or website like HealthVault, Argus etc. Unless, you do not mind spending extra money and fragmentation of data.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm impressed, December 30, 2013
By 
K. Rowley (Austin, Texas United States Planet Earth, Sol, Milky Way Galaxy) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The timing of the offer to review this iHealth wireless blood pressure wrist monitor couldn't have come at a better time. I just recently did a health assessment where I work and my numbers came back pretty high. My own doctor told me the same thing when I had him check me out. My doctor told me that if I wanted to get those numbers down and get healthy I was going to have to make some changes to my lifestyle, changes like what I ate and getting some exercise. He also wanted me to start taking my blood pressure at least four times a day and recording the results. I already had a wrist cuff BP monitor (that I rarely used), but I wasn't that confident in the results that it gave. I would use it at home and get fairly OK readings, but then get my BP taken at the doctor or the dentist and those readings would be much higher. Problem was I didn't know if I could trust the readings I was getting with my device. Either I wasn't doing it right, or the device itself may be not working properly. I had been planning on getting another monitor just so I would be able to compare readings.

As I mentioned, this was perfect timing to get this monitor to review. I had just recently purchased a gently used iPod Touch from the Amazon warehouse - which is required to be able to make use of this wireless blood pressure monitor (an iPhone will work too, and I'm guessing so would an iPad). I was a little concerned as the Touch was an older model (4th gen), but it works fine. I was able to download the free iHealth app from the Apple App store and install it with no problems. I should mention now that you do have to setup an account with iHealth to activate the App. Doing so is free, but they do require an email address and your name. You will also have to put some data in the App, such as height - weight - age and so on, but that is to be expected with a health device such as this. Connecting the wireless device was as easy as turning on the iPod Touch's bluetooth and selecting the wireless BP monitor. I did have to first charge the BP device (which took just under two hours to do the first time).

The BP monitor is very easy to use. You first have to make sure it is connected to the monitoring device - in my case my iPod Touch. I tend to keep bluetooth off when I'm not using it (which keeps the iPod's battery from running down). Once you have the wireless BP device paired to the monitoring device, all you have to do is open the iHeath app and put the BP monitor on your wrist. There is just one button on the BP monitor, which turns the device on & off (the device will also power down on it own when not in use). Once you got the BP monitor device paired to your iTouch/iPhone and have the app open - all you have to do is follow the on-screen instructions to test your BP. I mentioned earlier that I thought I might be doing something wrong when using my other BP monitor, this iHealth App not only walks you through what you need to do, but it also graphically displays the position of your arm so that you can get it into the correct position to do the test right. To me that is the thing I really needed. Now I'm getting readings that are more inline with what I get at the doctor's/dentist's office. You can also take your BP with the wireless monitor even if you don't have your iPod/iPhone with you, the monitor will store the reading till you can later access it with the iHealth app. Another nice thing about this iHealth App, it keeps track of your readings and can show you trends. There are other devices that you can add to it, I'm thinking of getting the pedometer later (I need to do some research on how functional it would be with an iPod Touch). Just an additional note, I happened to connect the BP monitor to my Windows computer - to charge the battery. The computer attempted to load a driver for the device but couldn't - that makes me wonder if there is maybe something that you could do with this wireless BP monitor if you connected it to a Apple computer. I don't have one, but I would be interested in hearing what happens when someone does (maybe leave me a comment if you do).

Overall I'm impressed with the quality of the BP monitor and the ease of use of the iHealth App., and would recommend it to anyone looking to get something that works with the Apple product line.

Just in case anyone is wondering what you actually get in the box for the iHealth wireless blood pressure wrist monitor, first off - it comes in a really nice hard plastic storage case. The case is form fitted to the shape of the monitor and has a clear top (the bottom part is white, as most Apple accessories tend to be). You get a charging cable - but no charger. The lack of a charger shouldn't be an issue as it's pretty much a given if you have a iPod touch/iPhone, you are going to have at least one USB charger . You also get a nice well written 'Quick Start Guide' that will walk you through the basics of setting up and using the BP monitor (the guide is in several languages). And in addition to the guide, you get a rather thick 'Owner's Manual' that goes into a bit more detail - but not as much as you might imagine given how thick the booklet is - the thickness is due to it being in different languages.

And just in case anyone is interested, with the changes I've been making I've gotten my BP down to the levels it needs to be (now if I can only keep it there).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This thing sucks..., May 7, 2014
By 
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
I picked this up at Best Buy on 05/05/14 and the thing has yet to give an accurate reading. i have an arm blood pressure monitor that works just fine compared to my readings at my doctor's office but the readings from the iHealth BP7 is way off, way off. This unit sounds cool with the app and all its features but it doesn't work. I'll be taking it back for sure.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars If only the readings were accurate., November 15, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
Ultimately the readings were consistently high by as much as 20 & 10 points respectively. Heart rate was accurate. I tested against both a reliable arm cuff and another brand wrist cuff. I also tried every position and trick to get an accurate reading but nothing worked.

If the reading were accurate this would be a great cuff as the other features were well thought out.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty much what you would expect from a wrist monitor., December 30, 2013
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
As far as accuracy, this wrist monitor is no better or worse than any other of its type. I have three wrist monitors and an old-fashioned manual sphygmomanometer with an arm cuff. I used to be a medical technologist and did a lot of pressure taking, so I remember that blood pressure can fluctuate a LOT during the day, while going down significantly during the night. Hard to make a comparison for accuracy without taking your cuff to the doctor's office and asking for a quick check. In doing that very thing myself at home, I found most of the wrist monitors measure a bit high, including this one.

So even if all the features were as advertised, it still wouldn't be worth it to me since I am always having to mentally adjust the reading by remembering how much higher than a manual unit it usually registers. This unit was designed originally to be used with the I OS as in the I-phone, I-pod and not the android OS, so some of the options do not work with the Android App. But you can read the results on your phone and also upload results to the web. I understand you have to create an account @ [...]although I haven't done this myself.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Inaccurate, times and again, April 5, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
First thing one expect from a BP monitor is to give accurate readings, or at least close to accurate ones.

This BP monitor either is defective or useless, we tested it multiple times. First I took the readings from professional BP monitor, and the ones in CVS, then compare the reading in this one.
(I am running high BP for a while and need to keep track of my readings) The BP readings from one in CVS and arm ones are 142/92 - Pulse 90
And on BP7 it shows 120/82 Pulse 87
First I though I must have done something wrong, so repeated it again after 15 min (after reading the manual that comes with it, and following the arm position according to app and diagram), and again it shows 120/79 Pulse 85
I again repeated BP test on a different arm blood pressure monitor and that ones gives 138/92-Pulse89

To be fool proof I had my husband test it as well, he first took reading with our old faithful arm BP monitor, which gave 122/72 - Pulse 72.
And then on BP7, which gave 101/76 Pulse 67

Bottom line is there is deviation of ~20, which is horrible.

I cannot trust this device.

I will try to contact iHealth and see if they have any suggestion. (If I hear back from them I will update my review). For now I would not recommend it to anyone, good concept but horrible implementation.

Update: April 14,2014

I have contacted iHealth, and explained the situation to them.
And here is their response.

"Thank you for this information. Our technicians would like to take your unit in for further testing. As the monitor was just purchased from Amazon, please contact them directly for the exchange.

We apologize for any inconvenience."

Well, it does not seems like they are eager to recall their defective product for inspection and investigate the issue. Instead told me to return it to Amazon.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars DO NOT BUY - Inaccurate readings, August 20, 2013
By 
Techy Guy (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
My father is a doctor. I bought this because I LOVED the idea. However, this unit falls prey to the same problems almost ALL wrist blood pressure monitors have... they're not as accurate as the arm units. This thing is cool. It looks nice, operates smoothly, and in IDEA, is wonderful. Unfortunately, in execution, it's not worth the price. I found it at Best Buy for $80 (a shame amazon didn't have it lower). I returned it a few days later after many tests.

Maybe one day they will figure out how to make these devices so they work, but this one does not AND, it's certainly not worth the price. If it were $20, I may have kept it for fun, but for $80 or more... no way.

Lastly, their Customer Service is not good. I called them during their business hours and they didn't answer the phone. What company in their right mind in 2013 doesn't have an operator or someone to field calls during business hours?

Good try, iHealth. Better luck next time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Easy Setup, Nice App, but Poor Accuracy!, April 4, 2014
By 
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
I bought this through the Apple Store for about $90, since I recently learned that I have high blood pressure and I would like to have a home blood pressure monitoring device. On the plus side, the item was very simple to set up and sync with my iPhone; the app was easy to download and use. Unfortunately, those were the only pluses.

I followed the detailed guide closely and also googled tips for accurate readings online (positioning level with heart, etc.) and made sure I was using it correctly. However, while I know my blood pressure is generally within a range of 135-145 / 90-99, this device gave me readings of 115-140 / 85-90. I had my blood pressure taken at my doctor's office a few hours before I made the purchase, and then, to double check, I went to CVS and took my blood pressure 4 times with a seated arm blood pressure monitor while waiting to get a prescription filled about a half-hour after taking 3 tests at home. Then I went home, sat for a bit, and took a few more iHealth readings. Here's what I found:

** iHealth BP7 (9pm) **
116 / 87
124 / 84
140 / 85

** CVS (9.30pm) **
146 / 103
153 / 90
144 / 104

** iHealth BP7 (10.15pm) **
125 / 91
132 / 84
123 / 89

Going to be returning the iHealth BP7, if the Apple Store will take it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unable to build pressure in the cuff., January 21, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: iHealth BP7 Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor for iPhone and Android (Health and Beauty)
The cuff tends to lose pressure; thus the test fails. I tried 10 times in a roll, and I finally give up.
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