iPhone: The Missing Manual and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.95
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!! (there is a chance this book could contain a gift inscription)
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

iPhone: The Missing Manual Paperback – August 13, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-0596513740 ISBN-10: 0596513747 Edition: 1st

Used
Price: $3.95
16 New from $3.21 155 Used from $0.01 2 Collectible from $9.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.21 $0.01

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: Missing Manual
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Pogue Press; 1 edition (August 13, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596513747
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596513740
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (216 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #983,297 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

iPhone: The Missing Manual Sneak Preview: David Pogue's Favorite iPhone Tricks

David Pogue with his iPhone

The iPhone's finger-driven interface seems natural and obvious. But when you really think about it, making it seem that way was no easy task. There are no menus in the iPhone software, for example, and no checkboxes or radio buttons. Everything on the screen has to be big enough for a fleshy fingertip.

On the other hand, the finger makes an outstanding pointing device; heck, you've been pointing with it all your life. It's much faster to scroll diagonally with a fingertip, for example, than with fussy adjustments on two different scroll bars.

Here, then, are some of the iPhone's unadvertised taps, double-taps, and other shortcuts, all culled from iPhone: The Missing Manual.

Double-Tapping

Double-tapping is actually pretty rare on the iPhone. It's not like the Mac or Windows, where double-clicking the mouse means "open." On the iPhone, you open something with one tap.

A double tap, therefore, is reserved for three functions:

  • In Photos, Google Maps, and Safari (the Web browser), double-tapping zooms in on whatever you tap, magnifying it by a factor of two.
  • In the same programs, as well as Mail, double-tapping means, "restore to original size" after you've zoomed in. (Weirdly, in Google Maps, you use a different gesture to zoom out: tap once with two fingers. That gesture appears nowhere else on the iPhone.)
  • When you're watching a video, double-tapping eliminates or restores letterbox bars.

See, the iPhone's screen is bright, vibrant, and stunningly sharp. It's not, however, the right shape for videos. Standard TV shows are squarish, not rectangular. So when you watch TV shows, you get black letterbox columns on either side of the picture.

Movies have the opposite problem. They're too wide for the iPhone screen. So when you watch movies, you wind up with letterbox bars above and below the picture. Some people are fine with that. At least when letterbox bars are onscreen, you know you're seeing the complete composition of the scene the director intended. Other people can't stand letterbox bars. You're already watching on a pretty small screen; why sacrifice some of that precious area to black bars? That's why the iPhone gives you a choice. If you double-tap the video as it plays, you zoom in, magnifying the image so that it fills the entire screen. Part of the image is now off the screen; now you're not seeing the entire composition originally broadcast. You lose the top and bottom of TV scenes, or the left and right edges of movie scenes. If this effect winds up chopping off something important--some text on the screen, for example--restoring the original letterbox view is just another double-tap away.

Secrets of the Sensors

The iPhone has three cool sensors. First, it has an accelerometer that detects when you've rotated the iPhone into landscape orientation. In programs like Photos, Safari, and iPod, it triggers the screen image to rotate as well.

Camouflaged behind the black glass where you can't see them except with a bright flashlight are two more sensors: a proximity sensor that shuts off the screen illumination and touch sensitivity when the phone is against your head (it works only in the Phone application), and an ambient-light sensor that brightens the display when you're in sunlight and dims it in darker places.

Apple says that it experimented with having the light sensor active all the time, but it was weird to have the screen get brighter and darker all the time. So the sensor now samples the ambient light, and adjusts the brightness; it does this only once--each time you unlock the phone after waking it.

You can use that tip to your advantage. By covering up the sensor (just above the earpiece) as you unlock the phone, you force it to a low-power, dim screen-brightness setting (because the phone believes that it's in a dark room). Or by holding it up to a light as you wake it, you get full brightness. In both cases, you've saved all the taps and navigation it would have taken you to find the manual brightness slider in Settings.

Earbud Cord Switch

Without close inspection, you'd have a hard time telling the iPhone's white stereo earbuds apart from a regular iPod's--but don't get them mixed up. The iPhone's earbuds have a tiny, embedded clicker/microphone partway down the right earbud cord.

That's right, "clicker/microphone." The tiny bulge is the microphone for phone calls. But if you pinch the bulge, you'll find that it clicks.

  • Pinch once to answer an incoming phone call. Pinch for a couple seconds to dump the call to voicemail. (You can also double-tap the Sleep/Wake switch on top of the iPhone to send the call to voicemail.)
  • During music or video playback, pinch once to pause the music; pinch again to resume playback.
  • During music playback, double-pinch to skip to the next song.

Customizing the iPod Buttons

The iPod module on the iPhone starts out with buttons along the bottom for summoning four lists: Playlists, Artists, Songs, and Videos.

But what about Albums? Genres? Composers? They're there, all right, but hidden; you have to tap More to see them.

But what if you use those lists more often than Artists or Songs? No problem: you can replace one of those starter buttons with a list of your own.

Tap More, and then tap the Edit button (upper-left corner). You arrive at the Configure screen. Here's the complete list of music-and-video sorting lists: Albums, Podcasts, Audiobooks, Genres, Composers, Compilations, Playlists, Artists, Songs, and Videos.

To replace one of the four starter icons, use a finger to drag an icon from the top half of the screen downward, directly onto the existing icon you want to replace. It lights up to show the success of your drag.

When you release your finger, you'll see that the new icon has replaced the old one. Tap Done in the upper-right corner.

Keyboard Speedups

Don't bother using the Shift key to capitalize a new sentence. The iPhone does that capitalizing automatically. Don't put apostrophes in contractions, either; the iPhone will put those in for you, too.

Force Quit, Reset

The iPhone is pretty darned simple and stable, but it's still a computer. In times of troubleshooting, these tips may come in handy:

  • Force quit a program. Press and hold the Home button for six seconds to force-quit a program that seems to be stuck.
  • Reset. If the entire iPhone locks up--it can happen--press and hold both the Home button and the Sleep/Wake switch for eight seconds. You'll see the screen go black, and then the Apple logo appears as the iPhone reboots.




McCallum's Awesome iPhone Period-Typing Shortcut

I have in my possession a nugget, a secret bit of iPhone information that's so valuable, such a headache- and time-saver, that I don't know what to do with it.

One voice in my head says, "Hoard it! Keep it a secret until your book is published! If you reveal it, it'll be all over the Net in hours, and all your competitors' books will have it, too."

But another voice says, "But this information is too good to keep quiet. Plus, you didn't discover it yourself. And besides, you're not gonna starve, either way."

Eventually, the second little voice prevailed. I'm going to share with you the solution to one of the most annoying things, if not THE most annoying thing, about typing on the iPhone:

The punctuation keys and alphabet keys appear in two different keyboard layouts.

So every time you want to type a period or a comma, it's a three-step, awkward dance: (1) Tap the ".?123" key in the lower left to summon the punctuation layout. (2) Type the period. (3) Type the ABC key in the lower left to return to the alphabet layout.

Imagine how excruciating it is to type, for example, "a P.O. Box in the U.S.A.!" That's 34 finger taps and 10 mode changes!

And therefore imagine how thrilled I was to receive an email from reader Andrew McCallum, containing a method of typing a period or a comma with only a SINGLE finger gesture.

The iPhone doesn't register most key presses until you *release* your finger. But Andrew discovered that the Shift and Punctuation keys register their taps on the *press-down* instead.

So here's what you can do, all in one motion:

1. Touch the ".?123" key, but don't lift your finger as the punctuation layout appears.

2. Slide your finger a half inch onto the period or comma key, and release.

Incredibly, the ABC layout returns automatically. You've typed a period or a comma with one finger touch instead of three. In fact, you can type ANY of the punctuation symbols the same way.

This makes a HUGE difference in the usability of the keyboard.

Type on, bro.



Book Description

About the Author

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the weekly personal-technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. His funny tech videos appear weekly on CNBC. And with 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how- to authors. He wrote or co-wrote seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own series of amusing, practical, and user-friendly computer books called Missing Manuals, which now includes 100 titles.


More About the Author

David Pogue is the personal-technology columnist for the New York Times. Each week, he contributes a print column, an online column and an online video. His daily blog, "Pogue's Posts," is the Times's most popular blog. David is also an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News and a frequent guest on NPR's "Morning Edition." His trademark comic tech videos appear each Thursday morning on CNBC. With over 3 million books in print, David is one of the world's bestselling how-to authors. He launched his own series of complete, funny computer books called the Missing Manual series, which now includes 60 titles. David graduated summa cum laude from Yale in 1985, with distinction in Music, and he spent ten years conducting and arranging Broadway musicals in New York. He's been profiled on both "48 Hours" and "60 Minutes."

Customer Reviews

The book is well written, easy to read and understand with good illustrations.
A. J. Way
For the most part, I find the iPhone very easy to use, and wonder why anyone would need directions on how to do some of the things this book covers.
Michael S. Wolfson
David Pogue's "The Missing Manual" series have been of immense help in my understanding of the iPhone upgrades.
B. A. Dilger

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 65 people found the following review helpful By John A. Suda VINE VOICE on October 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
For those who already know of David Pogue's Missing Manual series there is hardly any need to read a review of any of the latest publications, like "iPhone, the Missing Manual, Second Edition." For those in need of a written guide to the iPhone, you just buy the book and enjoy it, without wasting any time with comparisons, reviews, or undue deliberation. You can trust the author and publisher. For years, Pogue Press', the Missing Manual series, has been a benchmark of quality for the genre. In an era where manufacturers provide skimpy support materials, the Missing Manual series acts as a great substitute.

For those unfamiliar with the series, I'll elaborate on the iPhone book. It is a great book. It is designed to tell you in an objective casual, easy to follow fashion, all you need to know about using your iPhone. It is lavishly produced in heavyweight glossy paper with high resolution full-color graphics. The text is larger sized and organized in a very easy-to-read layout. There are many dozens of sidebar "Tips" which break up the text and make learning about the iPhone very easy.

The best part of the book is the content where you get a very thorough, comprehensive, and well-organized presentation of the iPhone hardware, software, and services. In six parts and fifteen chapters, Mr. Pogue covers nearly everything an average user needs to know about the product. There are plenty of sections covering advanced topics, as well, including use of the iPhone in a business setting. Part One is a guided tour to the hardware and how to get started making calls and texting. In this chapter and throughout the book, Mr. Pogue gives more than mere description and explanation of features, he provides step-by-step instructions and practical guidance on use.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 53 people found the following review helpful By FlyingPolarBear TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wow I love this book, it covers all the aspects of the iPhone 4S (and prior models), not just the software. For example a sidebox talks about what the Gorilla glass screen is made of, and there are explanations about where the various sensors are located (do you know where the proximity sensor is?), the antenna band, etc. This book is up-to-date and comprehensive - there are 21 pages devoted to Siri, an 11 page chapter just for iCloud, and info regarding iOS5 throughout (better coverage than the other books I've seen so far). The appendix contains some interesting sections on accessories and troubleshooting. If you have an iPhone 4S or an older model iPhone running iOS5, then this is a must-have book, especially for the price you can't go wrong!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
61 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Jack D. Herrington on August 27, 2007
Format: Paperback
As easy to use as the iPhone is it still has some secrets up it's sleeve and this is where "iPhone: The Missing Manual" comes in really handy. The book goes step by step through the basics of the phone, mail, browsing and the iPod functionality, as well as all of the other handy applications. And with each of those I found something I had missed along the way.

In addition to handling the basics he also has a lot of handy tips about special numbers to dial, the differences in the various email services, and handy keyboard shortcuts that have allowed me to get much more out of the phone.

This book is definitely worth the money, and I think it's a must have for anyone who has just bought an iPhone. If it's worth several hundred dollars to get the phone. It's worth another $14 to find out how to use it right.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
David Pogue and his team have done it again with the iPhone Missing Manual, 5th Edition, for all iPhones using iOS 5.0.1. This is a terrific full-color book with hundreds of screen captures and illustrations. The topics are logically introduced and explained for the new iPhone user and there are details and secrets of iOS 5 for those who have been using the iPhone for several years. The Missing Manual covers the differences in the iPhone 3GS, 4, and 4S models as well as the idiosyncrasies between iPhones using AT&T, Sprint, or Verizon when there is a difference. (If you haven't upgraded your iPhone 3GS or 4 to the free iOS 5, instructions are included for doing the upgrade.) The instructions are not all dry and dull as there is a lot of humor in the book (such as "You don't have to say "call" or "dial" in English. The iPhone recognizes the equivalent words in 32 languages. Collect them all!" (page 94)). One of the best features of "The Missing Manual" is that it does not go out-of-date, even as Apple releases updates to iOS 5. Page 5 of the book describes the website where you can find errata, corrections, and updates for the book. And be sure to see the inside back cover for "The Missing CD".Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?