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kids + money


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Editorial Reviews

About the Director

Acclaimed photographer Lauren Greenfield is considered a preeminent chronicler of youth culture as a result of her groundbreaking projects Girl Culture and Fast Forward. Her photographs have been widely exhibited and are in many museum collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the International Center of Photography. She was named by American Photo as one of the 25 most influential photographers working today.

Greenfield s first feature-length documentary film, THIN, aired on HBO, and is accompanied by a photography book of the same name (Chronicle Books, 2006). In this unflinching and incisive study, Greenfield embarks on an emotional journey through the Renfrew Center in Coconut Creek, Florida, a residential facility dedicated to the treatment of eating disorders. The feature-length documentary premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2006 and was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Direction in 2007. It won the Grierson Award for best documentary at the London Film Festival, and Grand Jury Prizes at the Independent Film Festival of Boston, the Newport International Film Festival, and the Jackson Hole Film Festival. The project was featured on The Today Show, Good Morning America, Nightline, and CNN and was excerpted in People Magazine. The Thin Book was honored by the 2007 International Photography Awards as well as the Photo District News Annual.

THIN is also a traveling museum exhibition curated by Trudy Wilner Stack that debuted at The Women s Museum in Dallas, Texas in February, 2007 and will travel through 2010. Girl Culture, Greenfield s last traveling exhibition, has been seen by over half a million people in more than twenty-five venues around the world. Fast Forward and Girl Culture were both optioned for development as feature films at Columbia Pictures and Universal Pictures.

Her latest project, an original short film entitled kids + money, premiered at the AFI Film Festival where it won the Shorts Audience Award. The film went on to screen at the Sundance Film Festival and also won the Michael Moore Award at the Ann Arbor Film Festival and the Hugo Television Gold Plaque for Documentary at the Chicago International Television Awards. It has also screened at Hot Docs as well as more than 40 other festivals throughout 2008. The film is a conversation with young people from diverse Los Angeles communities about the role of money in their lives. From rich to poor, Pacific Palisades to East L.A., kids address how they are shaped by a culture of consumerism. kids + money will broadcast on HBO in December 2008.

Greenfield graduated from Harvard in 1987 and started her career as an intern for National Geographic. Since then, her photographs have been regularly published in the New York Times Magazine, Time, ELLE, and American Photo and have won many awards, including the International Center for Photography Infinity Award, the Hasselblad Grant, the Community Awareness Award from the National Press Photographers, and the Moscow Biennial People s Choice Award. She is a member of the VII Photo Agency, an international photographic cooperative, and is represented by the Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York and the Fahey/Klein Gallery in Los Angeles.

She lives in Venice, California with her husband, Frank Evers, and their two sons.


Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: real people
  • Directors: Lauren Greenfield
  • Format: Anamorphic, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Greenfield/Evers, LLC
  • DVD Release Date: January 1, 2009
  • Run Time: 32 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001O4GDAM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #236,226 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael Nathan on January 7, 2009
Format: DVD
'Kids + Money' on HBO
This documentary examines American youths' relationship with money.
By MARY McNAMARA, Television Critic (November 28, 2008)

Social corruption is never quite as startling as when it's illustrated by children. In the one-hour documentary "Kids + Money," photographer and filmmaker Lauren Greenfield, ("Thin") interviews 13 Los Angeles children about their relationship with money, and as you would imagine, it is not particularly healthy. Here's 17-year old Emmanuel, who, with financial assistance, attends Harvard-Westlake and obsessively dreams of being part of the wealth he sees every day. Here's 12-year-old Annika, who badgers her mother constantly for a wardrobe that can pass muster in any of her school's cliques, and 17-year-old Sean Michael, who had to get a job when his folks refused to support his Nike habit.

"In L.A.," explains Phoebe, 16, in a bored voice, "the money is on the surface level. When you meet someone, it's like, 'Hi. I'm this person. I'm rich,' or 'Hi, I'm this person. I wish I was rich.' "

This "whatever" acceptance of life defined by possessions is balanced by a few more sensible voices -- Luis, 14, knows what it's like to go without food, and Zoie, 17, lives in such a tiny apartment that she shares a bedroom with her parents. But the point is clear: Many children are part of a status infrastructure so rooted in wealth it makes Edith Wharton's New York look like a socialist utopia.

It is easy to dismiss these kids, with their credit cards and spa birthday parties, as simply spoiled rotten. Tempting too -- especially when one young diva gives her mother, who is in the next room, the finger, or the almost finger, before looking at the camera with a hackle-raising mixture of guilt and defiance.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By grace on December 7, 2011
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Just stumbled upon this film after seeing Lauren Greenfield's other film- Thin- and thought this was phenomenal! great perspectives are offered and this movie should be seen by Americans of all ages to help realize some of the fundamental problems in modern society.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Nathan on March 13, 2010
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
'Kids + Money' on HBO
This documentary examines American youths' relationship with money.
By MARY McNAMARA, Television Critic (November 28, 2008)

Social corruption is never quite as startling as when it's illustrated by children. In the one-hour documentary "Kids + Money," photographer and filmmaker Lauren Greenfield, ("Thin") interviews 13 Los Angeles children about their relationship with money, and as you would imagine, it is not particularly healthy. Here's 17-year old Emmanuel, who, with financial assistance, attends Harvard-Westlake and obsessively dreams of being part of the wealth he sees every day. Here's 12-year-old Annika, who badgers her mother constantly for a wardrobe that can pass muster in any of her school's cliques, and 17-year-old Sean Michael, who had to get a job when his folks refused to support his Nike habit.

"In L.A.," explains Phoebe, 16, in a bored voice, "the money is on the surface level. When you meet someone, it's like, 'Hi. I'm this person. I'm rich,' or 'Hi, I'm this person. I wish I was rich.' "

This "whatever" acceptance of life defined by possessions is balanced by a few more sensible voices -- Luis, 14, knows what it's like to go without food, and Zoie, 17, lives in such a tiny apartment that she shares a bedroom with her parents. But the point is clear: Many children are part of a status infrastructure so rooted in wealth it makes Edith Wharton's New York look like a socialist utopia.

It is easy to dismiss these kids, with their credit cards and spa birthday parties, as simply spoiled rotten. Tempting too -- especially when one young diva gives her mother, who is in the next room, the finger, or the almost finger, before looking at the camera with a hackle-raising mixture of guilt and defiance.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 23, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Really. Her documentaries are incredible.

I appreciated that this one in particular didn't have any academic commentary (or any commentary whatsoever) because it allows the viewer to form her own perspective, without being influenced by dr-whoever, from whatever-university.

Fabulous.
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