Qty:1
  • List Price: $8.95
  • Save: $1.85 (21%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 16 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
l8r, g8r: Internet Girls has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

l8r, g8r: Internet Girls Paperback – February 1, 2008


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, February 1, 2008
$7.10
$0.24 $0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:



Frequently Bought Together

l8r, g8r: Internet Girls + TTFN (Ta-Ta for Now) (Internet Girls) + Ttyl
Price for all three: $20.93

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Internet Girls
  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Amulet Paperbacks; 1 edition (February 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810970864
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810970861
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #222,912 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 10 Up—The "Winsome Threesome" are back for their senior year, and boy, do they have a lot to talk about! This third and final installment about Maddie, Zoe, and Angela takes the girls in new directions, and, with Jana (the series' antagonist) back with a vengeance, they are struggling to retain their "bff" status. Rife with the daily drama of modern-day high school, the book's appeal is widespread. As before, the story is told through a series of instant-message and chat-room conversations and is written entirely in that "language," which also adds to its appeal. Suddenly, 200-plus pages don't seem like a lot, and reluctant readers gain a sense of achievement having breezed through what appears to be quite a lengthy novel. Be aware that as these teens mature, so does the book's content. Reading the first two titles helps with understanding references to past events but is not necessary to enjoy this one. Well written, thoughtful, and well developed, this novel is the perfect conclusion for this series.—Erika Kwasnik, Norwich High School Library, NY
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

The third book in Myracle's online chat trilogy, which began with ttyl (2004), finds Zoe, Angela, and Maddie spending most of their time considering boyfriends, college choices, and getting the better of a nasty classmate. Readers will recognize each girl's distinctive voice, personality, and particular chat style, all of which have remained consistent across the series. In this book Zoe loses her virginity--in her typical, carefully planned fashion; Angela has her pride damaged by a guy who first gives her a Jeep; and brash Maddie, who avoids getting into a romantic quagmire, sets the pace for the friends' rebellion against their parents' choices of colleges. This will certainly appeal to the characters' peers, but it's also a good choice for adults who want to know what's happening in teenagers' lives. Francisca Goldsmith
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

I read the 2 previous books in this series and was thrilled to have read the third book.
kora
This book is marketed to the pre-teen/early teen crowd, but it is completely inappropriate for the 11-15 age group.
Margaret
So much of the book is spent talking about relatively nothing; such is the nature of the instant message.
TheRustyKey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Allison Strine on December 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
My 6th grader brought this book home from a friend, and I was shocked, I mean SHOCKED (and I'm no prude), at the themes in this book. The storyline follows three high school seniors IMing with each other. They discuss in lurid details one girl's loss of virginity, as well as oral sex (in detail). One girl goes to a doc for birth control pills. They talk about drinking and partying as if it were the norm for a senior. There's an escalating theme of hatred as two sets of girls do increasing cruel things to each other, including one girl placing a Craig's List sex ad with another girl's home phone number. (The author seems to think it helps the dramatic tension to actually spell out the sex ad to the reader, in all its f-word, multiple orgasm glory.) One girl takes a gift of a jeep from a boyfriend she was about to break up with, but now decides to string along. Throughout the story, there's no feeling that the characters are anything but shallow, image-obsessed, crude, amoral people.

The thing that made me feel saddest about this book, aside from my daughter's innocence being dissolved after reading a tiny bit, is that this series of books are so popular. With all of the wonderful books out there for teens, this crap is part of a New York Times best selling series. Really? This is what we're spending our money on?

This book makes me want to have rating systems on kids' books. It was that gross.
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Margaret on August 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is marketed to the pre-teen/early teen crowd, but it is completely inappropriate for the 11-15 age group. There are graphic descriptions of both oral sex and the loss of virginity, as well as profanity, alcohol use, extra-marital affairs, and an overall message that pleasing a boy sexually is a prerequisite to becoming a woman. After performing her first sexual act on a boy as a "going away present" ("cause i won't c him for a week") one character actually exclaims to her friends, "I feel so proud of myself!" I can't imagine a worse book for a girl.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 34 people found the following review helpful By HeidiM on May 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book is so poorly written even if it was appropriate for children to read they should not. This is a 4th grade reading level at best yet geared for 15 year olds?? Why is the writing so moronic maybe it has to do with the three main dumb girls and the poorly written plot? Don't waste your time or your brain cells on this one.

Caution to parents this book is not appropriate for children, don't be fooled by the cover and low reading level.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By mbc on March 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
L8r,g8r is a book written in text messaging and instant chat format. The style of writing is very clever and is attractive to many teens, including my daughter. However the content of the material is anything but attractive or clever. It talks about demoralizing our youth with premarital sex, alcohol, and bullying. In the first 20 pages it talks about a visit to Planned Parenthood, a high school student going on the pill for her "boyfriend". An Aunt who has a sex toy party and does pole dancing.
Our children have enough being thrown at them from society on how to make good choices. This author did not make any natural consequence of the decisions that these kids made. They did things that were morally wrong and life went on as usual. The author failed to see teenagers as a full human being, with physically, social and spiritual means. She did not even talk about the spiritual needs of these characters. In fact she made fun of religion by having the girl " Zoe" have sex with her boyfriend for the first time in the basement of a church. It makes you wonder what kind of life this author has, and what her motivations are for teens to read this!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Kevin W. Plaxco on August 2, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book, apparently like all of the books in this series, is complete trash. Over my dead body will my kids ever speak or act this way. I am a liberal, long-haired academic and yet I am disgusted at the lifestyles that this book glorifies for young teens. I understand that drugs and sex often happen early, but glorifying them in any book, much less a book aimed at young girls is completely unacceptable. This book is trash. Do not let your kids buy it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 30, 2012
Format: Paperback
I can't fathom why Ms. Myracle chose to start writing these Internet Girls books after writing nice books for teens. I guess she thought she would hop on the chatspeak bandwagon, but just because something is popular doesn't mean it's good. This book is marketed towards the younger teen crowd, but this book (and the series) is rife with chatting about sex and drugs along with useless teen fluff and drama. It saddens me that Ms. Myracle thought that these books were somehow a good idea to write. Way to go, Ms. Myracle, contribute to the dumbing down and sexualization of today's teen generation.

If I ever tried to write a whole book in chatspeak, I'm sure I would lose quite a few IQ points. Chatspeak is appropriate in just a few situations or to send a quick message, and a book is DEFINITELY not one of them. Making chatspeak more acceptable/mainstream/"cool" will only further exacerbate the problems already besieging our society.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Wolfram Arnold on September 1, 2008
Format: Paperback
I find this book fascinating. And I find the reactions it gets in the reviews even more fascinating. This book is a social commentary on the life of high-school girls, their joys, their fears, their heart breaks, the parents, and the friendships that survive it all.

The content is naughty at times, yes, and whether that reflects reality I cannot say. I found this book thanks to my visit to a family with a 12-year old daughter, a demographics I'm otherwise not exposed to, as child-less 30-something male.

What's both surprising and a tad amusing to me, and, in my opinion, this is one of the hallmarks of this book, is that it provokes such strongly differing reactions between the two demographics that seem to read it. On the one hand, the teenaged readers who view it as a commentary of their own lives, finally a book in print that publicizes and expresses how they often must feel themselves, and that thereby validates these feelings, the dilemmas, the drama and the exhileration. On the other hand, the concerned parents who view the book as unwelcome agitation of their kids around topics such as sex and drugs that they'd rather keep them away from for some more time, and the fear that presumably underlies this anger that it'll make it harder still to "get through" to their kids.

No longer a teenager, neither a parent, I have no judgment about either, but if I had to say something to either group, I'd say to the teenaged readers that while life does contain drama, sex and boys, and that all these feelings are valid, it is not all that life is really about, and what looks big and insurmountable now will make you smile and laugh about a decade from now; this is entertainment, just like life on TV isn't really like life in the real world.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Lauren Myracle is the author of many popular books for teens and tweens, including New York Times bestsellers ttyl and ttfn (Abrams). She lives with her family in Fort Collins, Colorado.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?