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lol...OMG!: What Every Student Needs to Know About Online Reputation Management, Digital Citizenship and Cyberbullying Paperback – September 27, 2011


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lol...OMG!: What Every Student Needs to Know About Online Reputation Management, Digital Citizenship and Cyberbullying + Digital Citizenship in Schools, 2nd Edition + Thirteen Reasons Why
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 27, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1466242078
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466242074
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #131,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Matt Ivester is a Silicon Valley technology entrepreneur creating pioneering products that have significant impact. His new guide to help students become responsible digital citizens, lol...OMG!, may come as a surprise to those familiar with his previous venture, JuicyCampus.com, the most controversial website to ever hit college campuses. However, it was this prior experience that gave Matt an intimate knowledge of how students behave online, making him uniquely qualified to write such a guide. He is now a wiser version of his audacious 24-year old self, attending Stanford Graduate School of Business and using his talents to help future classes understand the potential pitfalls of their digital decisions.

Matt has never been afraid to take risks: after graduating from Duke University with a degree in economics and computer science and spending more than year as a consultant in New York City, he quit his job to pursue his passions for technology and entrepreneurship. Over the next three years, he raised and managed a multi-million dollar investment fund, created a website that transacted more than a million dollars in revenue, and built JuicyCampus.com - a simple message board that became a national brand.

JuicyCampus was supposed to be a fun place where students could gossip freely about parties, classes, sports and campus life. Unfortunately, it turned into what ABC's Katie Couric described as a "malicious cesspool of barbs, disses and insults." The site spread to over 500 campuses, garnering more than a million unique monthly visitors. Despite his policy of removing threats of violence, contact information and hate speech, Matt's efforts to mitigate the negativity were not enough. JuicyCampus sparked investigations by two state attorneys general's offices, generated hundreds of complaints from college administrators, students and parents, and continued to attract the attention of national media. The posts got so bad that student governments across the country voted to have the site removed from their campus servers.

Four years later, Matt hopes to share the lessons he learned. lol...OMG! is the result of what was left behind in the digital detritus of a million-dollar idea. Indeed, JuicyCampus represents Matt's own lol...OMG! experience, having created the site as a fun place where users could share their stories, only to find himself dealing with the complex issues of privacy, defamation, free speech and online civility. He admits that students could have been spared a great deal of embarrassment, drama and hurt feelings had it never existed.
For Matt, JuicyCampus has crystallized the notion that cyberbullying does happen on college campuses, and the lives and reputations of others always hang in the balance. With renewed perspective, having run the financial and psychological gauntlet of a controversy-battered start up, he has written a powerful manual that lays out in detail the dangers of bad online behavior, along with strategies and best practices that students can use to manage their online reputations and become more conscientious citizens of the digital age. His friend and mentor, philanthropist and GeoCities.com Founder David Bohnett, says it "will not only save reputations but literally save lives."
Matt has been featured by more than 100 media outlets-including The New York Times, Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Chicago Sun Times, Boston Globe, Forbes, Huffington Post, GQ, CNN, Fox News, ABC and CBS-and has been a popular guest speaker at college campuses, including Georgetown and Emory, where he has presented his ideas on entrepreneurship, free speech and online character assassination.

Stanford University's student government recently named Matt the Director of Digital Citizenship for the entire student body because of his experience with and knowledge of online reputation building. He is charged with putting together programming and curricula that address issues of digital citizenship, including building a positive digital identity and cyberbullying awareness. Matt hopes to use the programming he creates as a model for colleges and universities throughout the world.

Matt Ivester now studies reputation systems and entrepreneurship as part of the MBA program at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He hopes to start another successful internet company after graduation, combining his passions for technology and education. Matt believes young entrepreneurs must think about what social impact they have on the world; he wants to direct his ambition toward building tools that educate students on how to create a positive online image and avoid sabotaging career opportunities. As a member of the first undergraduate class to experience the real-world ramifications of their digital decisions and the once recipient of online death threats, Matt is uniquely positioned to present this revolutionary social media survival guide.
Born and raised in the heart of Silicon Valley, Matt is a technology entrepreneur to the core. He now lives in Palo Alto, California, where he enjoys golfing and developing business concepts between classes.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Matt Ivester has created a must read in lol...OMG.
Erin
The author, Matt Ivester, has unique insight in to the destructive power that social media has on youth, and offers some great advice on the topic.
Jon Jarc
The author did a really good job of presenting such complicated topics in a clear and organized way.
Edward K.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By J. Dellinger on October 19, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lol . . . OMG!, Matt Ivester's new book specifically for students about managing online reputation and digital citizenship, is a must read for college and high school students. Ivester is to the point, straightforward and informed about his subject and talks directly to students about navigating school/college in the digital age. Students today spend numerous hours connected and online - via laptop, smart phone and other digital devices doing homework, researching, communicating, and socializing. They are constantly presented with opportunities to share personal information and create content. In "Digital is Different," Ivester conveys the permanence, access, lack of control over content, replicability, speed and pervasiveness that make online conduct challenging for students to navigate. He offers recent stories about college students who have shared content online in ways that substantially harmed their lives and reputations and the lives and reputations of others, including incidents at Duke, Rutgers and UCLA. But he also draws attention to smaller cases - thoughtless "Likes" or online comments that end up in social media investigations of potential employees - or photos of questionable (or illegal) behavior that end up accessible to a wider audience than a student intends.

Ivester isn't preachy or dogmatic - instead, in "Becoming a Conscious Creator of Content," he gives students a series of questions to consider: "Why are you doing this [sharing info online]? Is now the right time? Where is your line between public and private? And How controversial do you want to be?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shopper on January 9, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One should approach lol...OMG! understanding it was not written by a researcher, though the author is credible due to experience as a social web entrepreneur as detailed in the text. The book reads like a very earnest effort by an MBA student, because that's what it is. Which is not all bad. Other books on reputation management are generally geared toward working professionals or those aspiring to be working professionals. That causes those books to have an abundance of professional networking-oriented information that often gets in the way of the main point. The main point being to consider carefully what you post because the content itself or the impact may not fade away within your lifetime. If the idea is to have a person get that simple idea said many different ways over the course of a fairly breezy book, that is what you'll get.

Strengths
1. Straightforward language and examples that a person can understand with no background in online communities research.
2. Brevity, particularly since the book appears to be padded with extraneous content to boost the page count.
3. Applicability, the plain language and compact content make for a book that is impactful without much effort to review.
4. The discussion on biases in Chapter 5 is the strongest content and it is clear the author invested time in explaining the topic for comprehension.
5. The discussion highlighting the impact of cyber bullying is a close second and is a topic other books on personal branding and online reputation typically do not address in this level of detail.

Weaknesses
1. As a general impression, the author opted too many times for platitudes and generalities to get through a given topic than to cite case studies, news reports, or prior research.
2.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ProfessorPost on December 17, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am starting my second semester using this book with my freshman Composition students, and the response has been wonderful. I had four sections of Comp. 2 at a Community college, with a handful of high school students, traditional college students, and a number of nontraditional students, with teens of their own. I was impressed with the very focused writing style, the nice way of wrapping up at the end of the chapter, and the use of real world examples. We want to develop digital citizens--this book can help. I am now going to use it with my Education class.

I developed a simple study guide, created a set of discussion boards, and gave students points for posting and doing the study guide. A much higher percentage of my students read this book, liked it, talked about it, and many used it as a resource for one of the assigned papers. I was so pleased with their responses; my high school students (enrolled in an online class) told me, "Our whole high school needs to read this book!"
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kathy on November 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a great book! I bought this because a friend recommended it and I am so glad she did!It's full of great advice about how to make the most of social media to build and enhance your online reputation. My daughter just started college and has regrets about some of the things she posted on her Facebook page in high school. She started reading the book as soon as I showed it to her and she can't put it down. She is so excited about all the great tips in the book about how to create the kind of profile that will present her in the best possible way. What a great book to come along now, especially in such a tough and competitive job market! I think it should be required reading in high schools and colleges!
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