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La muerte de Artemio Cruz (Spanish Edition) (Spanish) Paperback – June 15, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-9708120470 ISBN-10: 9708120472 Edition: 4th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Punto de Lectura; 4th edition (June 15, 2010)
  • Language: Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 9708120472
  • ISBN-13: 978-9708120470
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #163,247 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: Spanish --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Carlos Fuentes (Panamá, 1928) is considered the father of modern Latin American literature. Besides writing, he has held a number of diplomatic positions in the United States, Latin America and Europe. His works have received numerous awards such as PREMIO CERVANTES, PREMIO RÓMULO GALLEGOS, and PREMIO BIBLIOTECA BREVE. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

It almost never happens to me.
J. H. Carlos
In each one of them, financial ascent and physical/moral degradation are but one painful and irreversible process.
Maria A. Silva
De hacer sentir a otros, no solo en la novela si no en cualquier otro tipo de arte.
Arthur Wellesly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Luis Méndez on September 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Personajes : artemio cruz, catalina, Lorenzo, Teresa, Gloria, Gerardo, Gamaliel, padre Paez, Lilia, Laura, Lunero, Gonzalo , Regina, Locacion: México Año: diferentes fechas
La historia de Artemio es la historia de la ambición por sobre todas las cosas, el deseo desmedido de poder, la corrupción, la degeneración moral, dejar de creer en el amor y en las personas para empezar a creer en lo que se puede comprar y tener, en lo que se puede manejar, dominar, subyugar..... Esta obra esta escrita de diferentes maneras, en primera persona, en segunda persona, y narrador omnisciente, estados de conciencia y semiconciencia caracterizan la trama y los diálogos se sitúan como la vida misma dentro de la cabeza de Artemio, donde las fechas y los recuerdos van tomando su curso, para hacernos entender esa maraña de cosas que se tejen y destejen en su cabeza, para empezar a poner orden a esos pensamientos desordenados, que giran y giran y buscan tal vez el perdón y la comprensión de las mujeres, Catalina que nunca lo amo, Regina que lo amo con el alma, Lilia y Laura que solo querían su dinero, El destino, que lo hace verse viejo y sin herederos, su hijo completando su vida, muriendo la muerte que le tocaba morir a el en la guerra y que tuvo que ser muerta por su hijo en otra guerra al otro lado del mar que sabe a cerveza y huele a melón, que hay detrás del mar? Islas , ... Artemio, muere Artemio, no quiero verme viejo,. Por eso los controlo, por eso las uso, por eso me burlo de ellas, que me odian........ Es también una obra sobre el poder en México y la forma en que se maneja..... Excelente. LUIS MENDEZ
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Maria A. Silva on May 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
As an intersection of two major themes - the illusion of independence pictured in a faint bourgeois environment (Las Buenas Conciencias, 1959) and the nightmare of transculturation in contemporary life (La Región Más Transparente, 1958), La Muerte De Artemio Cruz (1962) rebuilds mexican history on the ruins of individual and social consciousness. The protagonist (the "yo" instance) is led to seek the truth in his own past, while the voice of memory ("tú") recalls the origins of a betrayed revolution ("él", the stream of historical action) and gives the dying man the last chance to imagine how things might have been from another point of view: the wish of community, a future raised by plural needs and dreams - "nosotros". From the epigraphs to the end of the novel, death and memory join forces to restore that manifold identity, stifled by Artemio's overwhelming projects. The physical death of Artemio corresponds to the rebirth of mexican history as a social body made of facts but also of feelings and emotions, concealed under the rough mask of authority. Throughout the text the feminine figures accomplish this mission as well, reflecting, like mirrors (so often mentioned in this book), the reality Artemio wants to deny. Four women - Regina, Catalina, Lilia y Laura - symbolize different periods of Artemio's life strongly attached to main revolutionary commotions (from the beginnings to their later political and economic metamorphose). In each one of them, financial ascent and physical/moral degradation are but one painful and irreversible process.Read more ›
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
Artemio Cruz, on his deathbead, passes through the events of his life in this Fuentes masterpiece. The novel is narrated in the first, second and third person, symbolic of the character's ego, id and superego. Cruz explores the deaths that spared him. His lack of courage and personal sacrafice, ironically, bring Cruz to fortune and fame. He leaves battle only to be heralded as a war hero. He escapes execution. Through deception, Artemio Curz earns permission to marry the sister of the man killed in his place. The language of the novel is rich and varied. The reader enters into the morphine-induced train of consciousness of Cruz, finds deathbed observations laced with old memories and jumps through the life of Cruz. La Muerte de Artemio Cruz is a novel of self--judgement. Before dying, Cruz examines the value of his existance.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Caveat: This review is specific to my current, idiosyncratic reading needs. Specifically, I need not to have my depression exacerbated. Short version: if you are ill and trying not to focus on your physical being, and would be disturbed by the graphic depiction of the physical decomposition and mental fragmentation of a dying protagonist who is sociopathic, power-consumed, hateful and in no imaginable way sympathetic, don't read this book. Longer version follows.

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Some people achieve greatness, and some people assiduously avoid it and have great novels thrust upon them. This one was inflicted on me by my book club, which chose it, presumably, to honor the recently-deceased Fuentes (who unquestionably *deserves* to be honored). I chose to read the Spanish edition, just because I could and would have felt guilty about doing otherwise, so your mileage may vary, linguistically speaking, if the English translation is especially good or bad, but I think my opinion would be language-invariant over all editions. I'm sure it'd be equally unremittingly depressing rendered into any form of human communication. (Don't get me wrong; it's a powerful, superlatively-well-written, historically- and politically-illuminating novel. Don't read it if you're already dysphoric, though.)

Understand that this isn't going to be incisive literary analysis (fat chance of that; sooner will I press a Mack truck than succeed in deconstructing Fuente's narrative technique). I'm really more interested in the politics of power and brutality and oppression.

Mikhail Bakunin said that, the day after the revolution, the revolutionary ought to be executed.
Read more ›
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