Are Nalgene polycarbonate bottles poisonous, as above reviewer claims? If you look up Bisphenol A in Wikipedia, you will read a lot of scary information. But is it blown out of all proportion, as a lot of 'hyper-hyper-health-nut' info is?

Hey, I want to be as careful as anyone with my health, as I have experienced the 'dread disease,' but after taking dozens of supplements after the diagnosis, my personal opinion was that they were a lot of hype without real science to back them up. I stick to super healthy food and a few select supplements.
I have a degree in medical science, which does not mean I know everything - we all know that medical science is now telling us that what our grandma told us was true, but still... >sigh< ...do you know what I mean by *overboard* and *hysterical*?

You will have to read and study some of the links and decide for yourself. I am simply unsettled and not sure.
If you read the FAQs, including the results of 50 years of *massively* large-scale studies on the safety of polycarbonates, on Nalgene's website, you will be convinced there is no harm whatsoever in Nalgene's PC bottles, and that these alarmists are taking *very* small and inconclusive studies, (as they are prone to do), and trumpeting doom and death to all who have ever taken a drink from a PC bottle. This site in particular distorts the results of studies, and preaches abstinence from all PCs:
trusted 'dot' md 'slash' blog 'slash' vreni 'underscore' gurd 'slash' 2007/03/29/plastic_water_bottles. It is one of the referenced sites in the Wikipedia article.

In contrast, this is what Nalgene's site has to say:
"Furthermore, several scientific panels including the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food, the National Toxicology Program and the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis have concluded that the weight of scientific evidence does not support the hypothesis that low doses of BPA adversely affects human health. None of the large studies conducted have substantiated the claims made by those performing some of the smaller studies frequently cited."

In conclusion, I am simply saying that oldamazonian's review is grossly distorted (by his/her own fear), and that you should not believe everything you read, just because it is posted in an amazon review.
Which, of course, includes my comments. Go read, study, and decide for yourself...
[UPDATED] asked by sunripened on April 4, 2008
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Showing 1-6 of 6 answers
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NOPE! They are BPA free. Dish wash and reuse away!
G.W. answered on January 13, 2011

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Your first mistake is assuming Wikipedia is a good resource to use. Two, I've used Nalgene bottles since I started college twelve years ago (I've since graduated, for the snarky among you), and so far, no third eye. Any health problems I do have are a result of three deployments, not my water bottle. Just drink from the thing. You're more likely to die from a lightning strike or a shark attack than death by water bottle.
Alessandra Vasyuta answered on January 8, 2014

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Nalgene used to have BPA. After coming under scrutiny, they no longer use it. They're safe. And durable.
Erik Bauer answered on November 8, 2012

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as a chemist, BPA is a seriously overblown issue. Yes, Bisphenol A has known issues. however, when it is polymerized, it is fully linked- aka- it can't leach. If there was BPA monomer loose in the item you were using- it would have NO STRUCTUAL INTEGRITY!
droptop answered on October 6, 2011

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Hmmm, then why is it required that all children's items be BPA free? And BPA has been proved to be a hormone disruptor. Just saying, as a medical professional.
G.W. answered on October 7, 2011

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Grossly distorted by fear? Who is distorting what? Precisely what IS your "degree in medical science"?

Is it surprising that "Environmental groups say [bisphenol A] is a dangerous chemical, while the [plastics] industry says its use in plastic products is safe"? The same denial pattern has been seen for years in tobacco companies' propaganda.

Several good substitutes for polycarbonate food and drink containers have existed for decades, so why add an easily avoidable risk factor? Canadian regulators evidently agree ---

http://www.revolutionhealth.com/articles/canada-to-ban-polycarbonate-baby-bottles-/reut-20080418elin010
OldAmazonian answered on April 20, 2008
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