The Prince and the Pauper (Dover Thrift Editions) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$29.61
Qty:1
  • List Price: $34.75
  • Save: $5.14 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The prince and the pauper; A tale for young people of all ages Paperback – May 17, 2010


See all 155 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, May 17, 2010
$29.61
$19.95 $24.55
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$37.56
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The prince and the pauper; A tale for young people of all ages + A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Dover Thrift Editions) + Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Price for all three: $38.66

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 422 pages
  • Publisher: Nabu Press (May 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1149502533
  • ISBN-13: 978-1149502532
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.9 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (160 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Made less satirical than Mark Twain's classic and simplified for younger readers, this retelling is still a lively romp. A beggar and a prince look so alike that they change places but then cannot immediately switch back. Mayer's (The Unicorn and the Lake) adaptation is serviceable if not sparkling; she retains all the key scenes of the story but flattens Twain's archaisms. While some of the original's sophisticated humor gets lost in the translation, much of it remains. For example, when Edward, the prince, tries telling pauper Tom's parents that he is really the Prince of Wales, Tom's mother responds, "Oh, poor Tom, it's all those books you read that's done this to you." And in court, when Tom is given a finger bowl, he drinks from it, announcing, "This is a very flavorless soup." Lippincott (Bruce Coville's Magic Shop series) vibrantly renders the ragged features of the paupers, and his tableaux are full of life. His palace scenes are ornate, light-filled watercolors of splendor in which the boys' homely, toothy faces seem like the only real and honest things. For readers not yet ready for Twain, this version, like its model, will make them think about their places in the world. Ages 7-up. (Oct.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grades 3-7--Mark Twain's classic fantasy comes to life in this outstanding reading and interpretation by British actor Kenneth Jay. Using his voice like an instrument, Jay creates unique voices for each of the characters. Providing additional background to this wonderful British accented voice is a number of excellent selections of classical music from composers such as Purcell, MacDowell, Wagner, and Tomkins. The opening short piece of Baroque music that sounds as if it heralds the entry of royalty sets the mood for this story of two boys who exchange places during Henry VIII's reign. Students who might never consider opening Twain's book will sit enthralled at Jay's reading, and they just might decide to read the book. This audiobook will be useful in both literature and history classes, and will even be enjoyed by adults borrowing audiobooks from public library collections. Few audiobooks are as good as the text version, but this one is a pleasure to sit back and enjoy.
Linda Skeele, Western Elementary School, Georgetown, KY
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

If you enjoy reading the classics, this book will delight you.
Pen
A book that captures your interest from the very start - and keeps you interested till the very end - providing lots of laughs in between.
avarma
The story was very entertaining and had plenty of Twain's quick wit and snarky humor.
Chris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 53 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 9, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Over the years many thousands of saxophone players, great and small, have learned to play using this book. The book is a comprehensive guide to playing the saxophone. It begins with how to put a saxophone together and how to play your first note and ends with some very sophisticated excercises. Anyone who begins on page one and follows the excercises through to the last page will be a proficient musician. If you just want to learn a couple of tunes to impress your friends, this may not be the right book for you. If you, however, really want to learn to play the saxophone, this is the only book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Knightley Emma on February 4, 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is our second Weiss recording. I prefer it to the Three Musketeers because (1) his voices are amazing (he acts them out much more in this story than in the other), (2) I like this story better, and (3) Weiss is much smoother in telling this story than he was in the other. I noticed a few places in the other where his wording seemed awkward or where he seemed to hesitate or stumble over the words. This one, on the other hand, was FLUID and beautifully done. Very highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Fiore on September 2, 1999
Format: Library Binding
This story has been a favorite of mine since I first read it as a child. I have re-read it many, many times, most recently to two of my children (who also enjoyed it), and it continues to be rich and engaging. Since the language is true to the era of the story, however, it may put some readers off. Others will find that the archaic language enhances the tale.
A beggar (Tom Canty) and a prince (Edward Tudor), who look so alike as to be twins, meet and swap clothes for a lark. But an accident of judgment stretches the lark into an adventure, and the adventure into a nightmarish struggle of life and death, honor and dishonor.
Hasn't everyone wished to be royalty at some point in their lives? And especially if you were the poorest of the poor, like Tom Canty, wouldn't it be your dearest wish as a child? This is a great and yet fearful adventure, superbly detailed and believable. It was carefully written in such a manner that genuine history leaves it possible. One of Twain's best ever.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Houston Book Lover on October 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My daughter is in 1st grade and started reading during the summer before kindergarten (so she has been reading for about 1 1/2 years). However, she has had difficulty making the transition from easy readers to chapter books. Many picture books seem too easy. Yet most of the chapter books intimidate her with the pages of words without pictures. The Level 2 Usborne Readers perfectly fill this gap. The books contain familiar, even classic, tales in a chapter book format. The books challenge young readers in that they are about 60 pages in length ("The Prince and the Pauper" is 63 pages). However, EVERY page contains a colorful image! This is a departure from most chapter books -- and one that keeps my daughter engaged. Also, all of the hardback Usborne Level 2 and 3 readers that I've ordered have come with an integrated ribbon bookmark. That is very convenient. The colors are bright. Their size makes them easy to hold and carry. Try them. You will love them for your child!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a great method book that takes you from absolute beginners to moderately advanced levels. Great for someone who is really willing to put in the extra time and effort. This isn't a book to just flip through. It is really worth taking the time to get into this book and truly study the art of playing the sax.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 14, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read the book The Prince and the Pauper, by Mark Twain. It is a book about Edward, the Prince of Wales, and Tom, a poor boy from the streets of London. Tom ventures out to the palace to meet a real prince, which was his lifelong desire. Edward rescues Tom from a crowd that jeered at him because of he was clothed in rags. The two become friends. They switch clothes and realize that they look exactly alike! But then everyone mistakes Edward for being the poor boy and Tom for being the prince. The boys are separated.

Tom is thought to be the Prince by everyone in the palace. When Henry VIII dies, Tom is declared Edward VI, King of England. He denies it and tries to tell them he is a pauper, but they think he is mad and teach him what he needs to know to act like a king. Tom learns to enjoy being king, but wants to return to his home and family.

Edward goes on a quest to find his way back to the kingdom and Tom. During his adventure, he meets Miles Hendon, a kind fellow who was on a journey to his home, for he had finally gotten out of a war he was fighting. Miles rescues him from another crowd that is about to throw him into the Thames River. He decides to take Edward in with him. Together, they travel to Miles' old home and then to the palace to declare Edward's rightful place as the prince.

I enjoyed this book very much. It has got a straightforward theme: Don't judge a book by its cover. I would recommend this book to either teens or adults, since Twain uses some hard-to-understand archaic English words like "hither" and "thither". This book is book is not easy to read, but has interesting adventures.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Steven G. Costenbader on June 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
Some interesting exercises and etudes. However the book is very dated. This book has not changed since 1929. I have an original 1929 version and the new book is an exact copy. The saxophone has evolved since 1929, and so should this book.

There is no mention of any of modern saxophone technique. For example the book still refers to an archaic saxophone with right hand low Bb,B and C#keys, there are even has exercises based on this ancient key system. No modern saxophone have these keys. I have never seen a sax with these keys, although the idea is interesting.

The book covers only your basic scales, major, and melodic minor. There is no mention of pentatonics, altered scales, whole tone, harmonics, multiphonics, altissimo etc.

This is not a bad book to have in your collection, but you will need more than this Universal Method to become the next Michael Brecker.

The title Universal Saxophone method may have been appropriate in 1929, it is certainly not appropriate for the year 2006.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?