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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
on September 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
I read this book and found it quite interesting, if at times a bit hard to keep straight due to the diversity of the materials provided. But I did find it useful as a portrayal of a group, or groups, of rather spooky "New Agers", in some type of common effort with maverick archeologists, Christian fundamentalists, intelligence-connected types, etc., whose agendas appear quite murky. The authors admit they do not quite know what these connections mean, but the connections do indeed seem to be there, and I found the account fascinating, if in the end still quite puzzling.

Other readers, as judged from the other reviews here, clearly have widely varying views on the value of the book, and so it evidently will not appear to everyone.

One shortcoming cited scornfully by a couple of earlier reviewers dealt with the lack of an index. I bought the original, hardcover British version of the book when in first appeared, and it had a 20-page index, which made the book much easier to use. The publishers of the US reprint evidently have a rather low opinion of American readers, and thus elected to delete the index, presumably in order to save a few cents per volume. This strikes me as despicable, and readers (or potential readers) should be aware that the actual authors of the book indeed included a very extensive index.
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
on November 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book will offend many mainstream believers. Whilst it is indeed difficult to follow if you are not a big reader, the content is rich and attempting to expose some very relevent facts that would seemingly be ignored, particularly by the traditional school of Egyptologists. It also conveys information about the rather shocking methods employed by modern governments to control the general populous. There are also references to big names, such as Gene Roddenbury and Uri Geller. Books like this should not be taken too lightly, it is a serious attempt to show an untold side of an interesting story, it does not pass judgement or make wild claims it makes concluscions based on the facts and largely leaves it up to the reader to decide.

The title could be more appropriate and the content could be trimmed and formulated into a more versatile argument, much of the heavy fact detracts from the main point and on many occasions you will find yourself wondering what relevence a certain part has.

Overall.. A slow book, that may require two reads to gleen all the facts, but if you enjoy conspiracy and the search for the truth, this is well worth a look.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on August 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
The book is a bit tough and I found myself re-reading parts of it on multiple occasions, but it's full of some really fascinating information and I deeply enjoyed the read. I especially liked the authors' methodology and very logical approach in the formulation of many of their arguments. It was so enthralling that it felt like a journey thru ancient Egypt into modern times. It also calls out a few popular blowhards who have made a nice living selling the idea that they have the answers to some of life's longest standing mysteries. It's true that you will not find a grand finale in this book, but it's not a fictional story... and the fact is that no one seems to truely know what the heck is going on. The authors stay true to their goal of relaying what they've found to the reader and it encourages you to think for yourself and come to your own conclusions, as we all should. I would recommend this book to a select few due to the nature of the subject matter... most scoff at anything that isn't widely accepted as fact by the supposed masses, and just can't accept that in all mans glory we still do not know why we are here, how we got here or even what exactly we are. I really wish I hadn't let my uncle borrow my copy... 2 years ago!
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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
on September 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
... 'The Stargate Conspiracy' is immaculately researched, and meticulously referenced. Not a single point is made within these pages that is not supported by a clearly specified and accessible reference. A well researched book does not need to make arguments and presumptions, Picknett and Prince merely draw the attention of the reader to a fascinating series of facts which allows any conclusions to be made independently and without emotive propaganda. Their approach as authors is down to earth and matter of fact, shedding scorn NOT on the great mysteries of life and the universe, but on the way in which they have been actively recruited, abusing the faith of well meaning people. A fascinating read, highly reccomended.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2012
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This is one of the weirdest books I've ever read. "The Stargate Conspiracy" is a kind of anti-conspiracy conspiracy book. When I read it the first time a few years ago, I considered it almost literally barking mad. However, after reading John Ronson's book "The men who stare at goats", it dawned on me that certain circles within the U.S. military and the CIA were up to some *really* strange things during the Cold War. Suddenly, "The Stargate Conspiracy" didn't feel so strange anymore...

Well, relatively speaking!

Lynn Picknett and Clive Prince claim that large chunks of the "alternative" milieu, including Robert Temple, Graham Hancock and Robert Bauval, are (perhaps unwittingly) being used as puppets by a vast and sinister conspiracy involving the U.S. intelligence services, bizarre quasi-religious cults and (in a worst case scenario) actual space aliens or disembodied spirit-beings. I have more mundane explanations, but I wouldn't be surprised if a double-check of Picknett's and Prince's sources would confirm many of the criss-crossing connections in their book. After all, it seems to be more or less proven that the U.S. military carried out secret parapsychological experiments during the 1970's, and that many of those involved really did believe in supernatural powers.

Picknett and Prince make several interesting observations. First, they point out that many of the alternative speculations about ancient Egypt aren't based on solid research, but on the channelled messages of Edgar Cayce. The ARE, a group of true believers in Cayce's readings, have financed their own digs at the Giza plateau. Another occult group involved in alternative Egyptology is the Academy for Future Science, headed by James Hurtak, who claims to have channelled a series of messages from extraterrestrials, "The Keys of Enoch". These and other groups are also involved in promoting the so-called face on Mars, and often connect Mars with Egypt. So far, no surprises.

Next, the authors claim that many of these occult groups have contacts with U.S. military or intelligence circles. And no, they don't just stare at goats! Under the leadership of Andrija Puharich and James Hurtak, a series of mediums began to channel The Nine, a group of spirit-beings claiming to be the gods of Heliopolis, a town in ancient Egypt (the Biblical On). The Nine claimed that mass landings of UFOs would take place at some point in 1978, etc etc. One of the mediums who supposedly channelled the Nine was...Uri Geller! According to Picknett and Price, Geller was hypnotized during the sessions when The Nine "came through". Interestingly, Geller wasn't impressed by the "gods", regarded them as silly, and broke off his relations with the people behind the experiments. It seems Geller was the only sane person in these circles...

As a final clinch, "The Stargate Conspiracy" wonders whether real aliens or evil spirits may be involved in this sordid affair, or whether the whole thing is just as ploy by the establishment, perhaps as a massive experiment in psychological warfare or conditioning? The authors point out that both "The Keys of Enoch" and other channelled works from The Nine have become popular in New Age circles, despite containing racist (anti-Black), elitist and apocalyptic ideas. Prince and Picknett are spiritual libertarians who resent any kind of hierarchical control from Egyptian gods or anyone else, on Earth or in Heaven, and therefore conclude their book with a call to humanity to finally grow up and throw away all religions of old. Their favoured alternative is a return to shamanism.

As already indicated, I have a more mundane explanation of the "stargate conspiracy". Since many people are superstitious, it's not surprising that such people can be found even in the establishment. Since intelligence and military circles are (almost by definition) paranoid, some pretty strange projects can be launched by such people. Besides, parapsychology came close to becoming a respectable science during the immediate post-war decades, so experiments with remote viewing may not have been seen as *that* strange during the period in question. (I admit that channelling the Ennead of Heliopolis just might have.) As for establishment occultists being hierarchic, elitist and racist - well, what did we expect? The opposite?

There's no particular need to postulate an actual, conscious conspiracy to explain the facts unearthed by the authors at Giza or elsewhere. But sure, many of their claims are pretty startling even in their own right. Was the boss of Egyptian archaeology, Zahi Hawass, really educated with grants from the ARE? Has he really lectured regularly at events organized by the ARE or the AMORC? Did some occultists interested in "the face on Mars" have connections with NASA? And whatever happened to The Nine, anyway?

I'm not sure how to rate this anti-conspiracy conspiracy theory, but in the end I'll give it four stars for old times sake. I mean, "The Stargate Conspiracy" is something of a cult classic...at least among three people in my social circles. ;-)
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38 of 51 people found the following review helpful
on June 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
One might think they will find the truth about extraterrestrials and anienct egypt upon reading the front cover. You won't. You'll read a looooong boring and confusing story of the conspiracy that well-schooled people believe that aliens are going to land soon and change the world.
There are some interesting facts about the mysteries of ancient egypt which was the highlight of the book. I thought there'd be more of that. Most of the book is the conspiracy and many of the anecdotes of the conspiracy have a very loose connection to the point of the book. If these little stories were somewhat interesting this wouldn't be much of a problem but they are terribly drab. And after reading 200 pages of this with something interesting now and then, THEY DON'T EVEN HAVE A CONCLUSION. They don't know what to draw from what they present. The cover of the book says The Truth About Extraterrestrial Life and the Mysteries of Ancient Egypt. The back cover asks the questions like "what does this mean for mankind? Why are they keeping this information to themselves?" as if they are going to answer them. But they don't. They merely restate these questions. I'm glad I skimmed the last 100 pages. This book is misleading in its intent. What a waste of time.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I cannot recommend a book on esoteric subjects more highly. I wasted a lot of time and money reading occult rubbish while researching for my film The Truth Is Out There (starring Dean Haglund, X-Files). This book could have helped me sort through the fog much faster. These authors are always well researched and when speculating they make it clear that that is what they are doing.
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25 of 34 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon August 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is quite thought-provoking, even though it seems the authors are not quite sure what conclusions can be drawn from the web of connections they have uncovered. It would seem that there are a number of converging, overlapping agendas that involve promoting or facilitating theories about ancient gods, aliens, and a "New Age" era in which these alien or extradimensional entities reappear. Unfortunately, the authors have not been able to pin down the motives of the various writers, occultists, researchers, and government agents involved in this web. This is a fascinating story that helps readers recognize that things are generally not what they appear to be on the surface. This helps explore the dangers of belief-system manipulation and credulity. I personally suspect that some of the people discussed in the book are not intentionally participating in any "conspiracy," even though their research and theories may be promoted or facilitated by others with a manipulative agenda. Similarly, there are lots of channelers around who are too easily impressed by the phenomenon and by any entity that wishes to lead them on some deceptive path. Thus, the Stargate Conspiracy is at its core a story of gullibility and manipulation that can catch many in a web of intrigue.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
So interesting I forget am I reading science fiction or the real thing?
Very very interesting.
The stargate idea is not somesthing new but the way is presented here is innovative.
Does it apply to modern science?
The author is trying hard to convince you.
Read the book. It is fascinating.
Personally, I liked it.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2010
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This book is extremely confusing at best. It is chocked full of endless, dull, hard to follow information. The context does not flow easily, leaving you lost and having to re-read paragraphs over and over again. It is very apparent early on that this material did not go through any type of professional proof reading. I have never seen a book with so many mis-spelled words and gramatically challenged content. The information in this book may somehow be interesting to some but I could not make it past the third chapter and I tried several times. Normally I do not like to leave negative feedback but if I can help someone save a little money I feel it's worth mentioning.
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