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asked by MA Stewart on September 5, 2011
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Les Schmader answered on September 6, 2011
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Les Schmader answered on September 6, 2011
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I just noticed this thread. MA, the GF2 does *not* have in-camera image stabilization. The camera menu is used to control the lens image stabilization. Turn OIS on using both the menu and the lens switch and you will be fine.
Martin Unsal answered on October 6, 2011
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Martin is correct. Panasonic G series cameras do not have "in body" stabilization. Many of the G series cameras do have a menu setting that allows control over the lens OIS when there is no switch on the lens itself. In general, leave the camera menu setting to on and use the lens switch to control OIS. If you have one of the new lenses that does not have an OIS switch, and you want to turn OIS off, then use the camera menu.
J. McVey answered on February 1, 2013
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With the GF2, the lens on/off switch overrides the in-camera menu on/off . So the switches (camera or lens) are redundant, but the lens setting overrides the camera setting. Both control the lens OIS. The camera has no image stabilization built in to the body.
Some Panasonic lenses have OIS but no external switch, so you control OIS through the camera setting. Other (some Panasonic and all Olympus) lenses have no OIS, so with those lenses you will not have any image stabilization regardless of what your camera setting is.
PJ1 answered on February 5, 2013
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Thanks for the explanation, Les. So, it seems that as long as the IS is turned on, in-camera, it doesn't matter whether it's on or off on the lens. I made do some A/B testing to see if there's a difference with the lens switch on/off while the setting is switched on in-camera.
MA Stewart answered on September 6, 2011
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