Customer Review

353 of 366 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent photo camera! Video...hmmm, March 4, 2010
This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
First, I have an extensive background in both photography and video. I was looking for a smaller camera to carry around that could also shoot video. When I heard about this one I thought it would be perfect and it is good, very good BUT its does have its issues... I will try to keep this short and to the point.

Pros:

1. Superb image quality in both photos and video.
You can expect image quality comparable to a Canon Pro DSLR.
And I am not just saying that. I actually did compare it to our 1Ds MkII.
This camera can produces usable images up to ISO 3200. Noise is there but they
do a good job of controlling it. With this said, it would be noted that there
really isn't that much difference between a Canon 20D and the most expensive DSLR
for photos that will be displayed on the web or in regular size prints.
If you don't really need video then you can save yourself a lot of money and just
get a used 20D :) I actually still have my original 20D as a backup.

2. Amazingly, the 18-55 kit lens turned out to be remarkably good. How good?
Well, within the center area of the frame it would give the more expensive lens a run for their money :)
Where it begins to break down is in corner detail but this is to be expected.
The focusing is also too noisy to use for video, IF you are recording sound.

UPDATE: if you are looking to upgrade the lens, I can recommended the Canon 15-85 IS.

3. The built in mic is also very good. Even on regular video cameras this is almost a universal weakness.
If you are looking for a better mic I can recommend the Rode SVM Stereo Video Mic.
Works very well with this camera, unlike the Audio Technica 24CM. Its not cheap but good mics never are.
On all of these cameras hiss is a problem to varying degrees especially when recording in a quiet environment.
The quiter the source the more you will hear it. The only way to get remove it is to use an external audio
record like the Zoom H4N or do it in software with something like SoundSoap.

4. Light weight compared to the higher end Canon bodies.

5. Amazing low light video capability. With a fast lens f2.8 or lower even a Pro video camera can't touch it.
So if shooting in dark places is a big requirement then these cameras are the way to go.

Cons:

1. This is my biggest problem. I personally find the small body a lot more difficult to handle than the larger
Canon cameras we have. Maybe I am just use to the larger bodies but they are a lot more natural and easier
to work with. If you shoot pro or semi pro get the 7D just for this reason. The battery grip will help.
I have small hands so I hate to think how it would feel with someone that has large hands. I would highly recommend
you go somewhere and play with the T2i just to see how it feels in your hands.

UPDATE: The BG-E8 battery grip makes a big difference in this regard!

2. For my personal taste I find the T2i to over expose a bit. This could be related to the Peripheral Illumination
Correction, Highlight Priority, etc. I usually just under expose by 1/3 of a stop to compensate for this.

3. My 2nd big disappointment is the video. The video quality is superb this is not the issue. Where the problem lies
is in actually using the camera as a video camera. It has two big problems in this regard: the manual zoom and lack
of auto focus. It is practically impossible to hold the camera steady and do a smooth zoom in or out. Panning and zooming
at the same time is almost impossible. A regular video camera have electronic zoom controls that allows you to zoom
in and out very smoothly. The other problem is lack of auto focus. Sure you can refocus manually but again very difficult
to hold the camera steady and focus. Using the camera auto focus in video mode is possible but its really slow and
the mic will pick up the noise from the lens as it hunts for the focus. For me, this means, the camera is more useful
for recording short video clips not a full video shoot e.g. shooting a whole wedding. I don't feel it can replace a regular
video camera as yet. For example, if you are thinking of using this camera to shoot your kids running around, it can do it,
but there will be a lot of out of focus parts because it cannot track a subject like a regular video camera can and you
won't be able to adjust the focus quickly enough either.

UPDATE: the video can work for the most part, IF you shoot with the intent of editing the final video. A SLR will require
a bit more post production work than a regular video camera but the video quality will be superior. It works more like
a professional film camera they use in movies than the video cameras we know. But with that said, this camera still has
some real issues. Neither the shutter or aperture is continuous. You can only change them in 1/3 intervals...enough to
cause a jump in exposure in many instances. On top of that you cannot change anything without recording the clicking
noise the dial makes when you change the values. If you are using the mic in or on the camera this is a problem.
With this camera you have to setup a scene, setup your exposure, set your focus, and shoot the scene. Don't plan on
making any changes while you are shooting. So while the manual control is nice its not usable while shooting a scene.

If you can live with the Cons. Its a great camera that offers image quality comparable to any high end Canon model.
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Comments

Tracked by 4 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 21 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 4, 2010 3:41:27 PM PST
Paul Cooke says:
Just a quick word on playing back the MOV (mp4) format video in VLC. Make sure to change the 'Skip loop filter for h.264 decoding' option from 'none' to 'all' (Tools>Preferences>All>Inputs/Codecs>Other Codecs>FFMpeg). It'll make a big difference in VLC's ability to playback Canon's 48mbps streams smoothly.
Another option is to install a commercial program such as PowerDVD and enable hardware video decoding, if you have a compatible graphics card (eg. nVidia 8 series and up, or ATi Radeon HD26xx series, and up). Hope this helps.

Posted on Mar 4, 2010 6:17:14 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 4, 2010 6:18:21 PM PST
TO note on your video, any "PROFESSIONAL" will use a tripod or rig to stabilize shots. Second many more PROFESSIONALS use a follow focus ring to focus their shots. Your assumptions about video are not true. Professionals are using this camera right now to film movies, just because you do not know how to use this camera do not state your opinions as facts. This movie clip was done with this camera..... I rest my case...... Follow this link
http://vimeo.com/9784511

Posted on Mar 4, 2010 6:54:52 PM PST
ij says:
>> Sure you can refocus manually but again very difficult to hold the camera steady and focus.

I guess you can detect and eliminate that kind of shaking with post-processing - try iMovie for example.

Posted on Mar 6, 2010 7:40:25 AM PST
"I personally find the small body a lot more difficult to handle than the larger
Canon cameras we have. "

Most users would not agree with the above statement. The bigger ones you like are actually "clunkers" to hold.

Posted on Mar 9, 2010 12:47:43 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Mar 11, 2010 11:34:43 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 12, 2010 5:37:38 AM PST
JOEKC says:
Thanks, Paul. That worked. At first I thought I had a defective camera (I'm shooting with the D7) until I figured out I had a playback problem. Even though I have the D7, I think it's the same as the Rebel. I had never heard of VLC before, but it seems to work just fine.

As an FYI for those of you running Win7, the Rebel T2i/D7, the video files open very nicely with the Windows Live Movie Maker. For some reason this program is not installed with Win7, but is a free download from MS. It's a nice, simple program, much better than the old one.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 13, 2010 9:26:50 PM PST
Alan8888 says:
Thanks! Will give it a try.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 13, 2010 9:29:30 PM PST
Alan8888 says:
Maybe I use a different word :) Anyone who is use to using a regular video camera be it pro or semi pro will find these issues a bit frustrating. Of course, you can work around anything. If you require video with top quality and interchangeable lens then its an option that cannot be beat otherwise an average person may find it a bit frustrating :)

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 13, 2010 9:30:48 PM PST
Alan8888 says:
I guess its all a matter of what you are use to. I find this camera with the battery grip fine.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 25, 2010 11:39:09 PM PDT
BigBrother, then I am not most users...I really disliked the smallness of the T1i and opted for the 50D at the time (not interested in video so not an issue for me). The 7D was a bit more than I wanted to spend. Also, I knew in a couple of years I would go to a FF. Looking at the specs on the T2i is impressive (Canon did good and should expect to make great headway in the consumer DSLR market), but still the smaller body does not suit me and I have very small hands. The 50D is not a "clunker", just feels right for me.
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