Customer Review

151 of 161 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deliciously Witty & Acerbic, May 10, 2009
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This review is from: The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World's Most Glorious - and Perplexing - City (Hardcover)
I absolutely adore David Lebovitz. I took a couple cooking classes from him several years ago and am a fan for life. His recipes are the absolute best plus he is smart and hilarious. So I had to have his book which shares incidents from his life since his move to Paris. It's a quick fun read that will ring true to anyone who's spent time there. David spares no one, from the French men in their religion revealing bathing suits to the American tourists in their fanny packs and plastic flip flops. David shares incidents which will have you laughing and glad you live in the U.S. yet earning for the unique charm and culinary delights of Paris. The book is filled with Parisian shopkeepers who would rather smoke outside or text their friends than sell you cheese that you are unworthy of; the mindless buracuracy needed to return an item that broke with its first use; and the endless strikes that usually start right outside his apartment. While David can be acerbic and slightly misanthropic, he's always endearing. Of course, the recipes look amazing and I can hardly wait to try them.
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Aug 14, 2009 11:12:46 PM PDT
ZoomerX says:
"David shares incidents which will have you laughing and glad you live in the U.S. "

That would depend "where" in the US, of course.

Posted on Mar 1, 2011 6:12:57 PM PST
an1337 says:
"David shares incidents which will have you laughing and glad you live in the U.S."

Interesting take-home message from this book. I see you hail from Texas. A place that makes the French equally glad they live in France.

Posted on Mar 16, 2012 7:38:01 AM PDT
Yes, it's funny and the book may contain some 'truth' about Paris, Parisians and so forth but our extensive visits to Paris and to France do not confirm the unfortunate stereotypes presented here. We have found shopkeepers to be attentive and devoted to their work. It is true that we can be polite in French and we dress toward the formal side of casual clothing and we do radiate some understanding of and pleasure in what is on offer. Playing up stereotypes of a culture does little good for the image of the 'Ugly American' in France. Travel writing could best be about building understanding between cultures.
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Location: Dallas, Texas

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